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View Full Version : Adventure Games. Now many did you complete without cheating?



tezza
April 17th, 2008, 07:22 PM
Ok, lemme be first.

How many old-style, text-based, Adventure games did you actually complete, without using a cheat sheet or walkthrough?

For me it was all the original Scott Adams Adventures including the two-part Savage Island one (most satisfying).

And I ALMOST managed Zork 1 (98%). I had to cheat to get 100% though.

Gawd I must have had heaps of time back in those days! Either way I was considered very weird by my peers. Those days (1981-83) computer gaming was still pretty much a fringe activity, especially among adults.

Tez

Erik
April 17th, 2008, 07:25 PM
I never got a perfect score without a walkthrough, but I did finish the original Colossal Cave adventure as well as Zork I without help. Heck, when I played there weren't any walkthroughs! :D

chuckcmagee
April 17th, 2008, 07:59 PM
Hmm, think the answer is ONE for me. Pretty sure I made it thru a Leisure Suit Larry all the way without doing the walkthru thing. Like everyone else, I used the walkthru later to get the 3 or 5 points I had missed originally. Might be TWO, think I made it thru one of the Zorks too. Myst is maybe possible to make it, but it would take a LONG time to figure out some of the puzzles. The puzzle with colored marbles, I have no idea how you could figure that out without cheating. I still have Myst III sitting there, unopened.

tezza
April 18th, 2008, 03:31 AM
Remember the map-making you had to do with these old text-based adventures. There was always a maze.

Speaking of mazes, I also remember Asylum on the old TRS80 M1 clone. I never finished that one and it drove me nuts!! I'm sure it drove people to a real asylum as (if I recall correctly) the program had a bug (or maybe it was Asylum II?). Anyway, you could never actually finish it due to the fault.

People went mad trying to solve it.

Tez

atari2600a
April 18th, 2008, 03:35 AM
ah, Adventure Games: My genre of choice! I don't believe I have ever gotten all the way through one w/o a walkthrough. Hell, I couldn't even *start* Leisure Suit Larry w/o researching those damned questions! :P

carlsson
April 18th, 2008, 06:34 AM
I don't think I've finished a single one. However I have written a few small ones myself, but got bored of debugging the map so I consider the last one I wrote for not quite finished. I mean, most of the time it is a good thing if you can come back from the location you were at before if you move in the opposite direction. Sometimes though it should not be possible on purpose. For a while it was popular to include mazes, deserts or forests you could not get out of without ending the game. That's rather silly I think.

barythrin
April 18th, 2008, 09:05 AM
lol. Interesting topic. I don't think I've ever played a text only adventure game all the way through let alone cheated to get through it. I had a simple graphics game called "Castle" for my x86 (similar to dungeon hack where everything is an ascii character) which was fun and I beat that without cheating although I think you had to play it all the way through. I know I had a D&D game that was text for x86 also but I don't recall getting anywhere in it as a kid.

Graphically I beat The Black Couldron without cheating a few times although it took forever waiting for him to walk across the screen and then wait for it to load the next screen lol (I remember playing it off floppy until I realized how to get it on the hard drive and play). I never played the original Ultima's although I'd like to but the first one I did play (6) I definitely had to cheat and even then never finished the game. Got in an ackward situation of finding the main gargoyle and all my characters having boosted stats and high weapons but we couldn't kill him, he'd just fly out into the ocean a little and come back and get attacked again. I also killed Lord British in one of them (had to cheat) but that crashed the game lol.

Almost on topic we used to play the TSR games all the time though.. man those were fun with a group of us. We'd all make our character on the team, either change seats to control our character in each fight or just tell the person on the PC (whoever was fastest at navigating through these towns) what our character does. We'd have one person on the floor with the "journal" (came with the game) to read what the signs said, etc, and another person with the real D&D Compendium to know anything about the creature we were about to fight and if we could take them on or not, weaknesses, etc. Boy were those the days getting a group of friends huddled around a 1 player game but still playing it as a group.

- John

Sharkonwheels
April 18th, 2008, 10:05 AM
Almost on topic we used to play the TSR games all the time though- John

Nope.
Not even CLOSE to on-topic... ;)

But, yeah, I think probably quite a few of us on here, over 40, played the TSR D&D and AD&D games.

Right?
Right?

Get your head out from behind the LCD, and fess up - you KNOW you did!

T

barythrin
April 18th, 2008, 12:24 PM
Oh my mistake there.. yeah I meant the SSI versions of the TSR games. But yeah, I played the real thing too and used it while playing the computer equivalent which added to the fun.

DoctorPepper
April 18th, 2008, 12:36 PM
Oh boy, this is embarrassing.

Even though text-based adventure games were and are my favorite type of game... I've never completed even one!

I've got Zork 1, 2 and 3 on my PC, maybe I'll start playing Zork 1 again just to see if I can finish it. Oh, and without cheating! :-)

Terry Yager
April 18th, 2008, 01:02 PM
I don't think I've ever played any game for more than an hour-or-so. I have the attention span of a gnat.

--T

DoctorPepper
April 18th, 2008, 02:24 PM
I don't think I've ever played any game for more than an hour-or-so. I have the attention span of a gnat.

--T

More like:

"I don't think I've ever played any game for more than an hour-or-so. I have the attention span.... Oh look at the pretty flowers!!!"

;-)

willowmoon93
April 18th, 2008, 03:56 PM
Empire of the Overmind was the only text-based adventure game that I ever completed without using any hints, cheats, etc. I remember playing it on an Apple II+ at the school library. Liked the game a lot but man those Infocom games were by far the best. Unfortunately I only got so far with them before I had to resort to obtaining hints whenever possible.

Terry Yager
April 18th, 2008, 05:28 PM
More like:

"I don't think I've ever played any game for more than an hour-or-so. I have the attention span.... Oh look at the pretty flowers!!!"

;-)

You got me pegged...

--T

tezza
April 19th, 2008, 03:59 AM
Almost on topic we used to play the TSR games all the time though.. man those were fun with a group of us.


Agreed. I found they were most fun as a group. Some of the Scott Adams games were solved like this. One Scott Adams game (Pyramid of Doom) involved my whole family.

I was 23 at the time, and the rest of my family (six other siblings and parents) all lived in different places throughout the country. Anyway, one Christmas (must have been 1981) I bought my Model 1 clone with me back to Mum and Dad's place. The rest of the siblings were there too.

Microcomputers were new things, and everyone found it a curiosity. However, while there we (as in the whole family) started to play Scott Adam's "Pyamid of Doom". By the time I was due to leave after new year, we had made good progress and were about 80% through. The rest of the famly was addicted by this stage, and really wanted to solve the game.

This lead to a number of phone calls at all hours of the night and day once I was back at my place, with family member ringing saying things like "I just had a thought...have you tried yelling? Maybe the iron pharaoh will fall off the cliff?" and other such suggestions. My mother was the worst! She (even now) is a sports fanatic and very competitive. No way was that game going to beat her...hehehe

I had to let each one know if I made any progress by phoning. And these were the days when long distance calls (anything over 50km or so) in NZ were expensive!

It was all great fun, and eventually solved at last. The iron pharaoh was the hardest to deal with. The solution is both clever and novel, but also plausable (I won't spoil it by posting the solution here.).

Hats off to Scott Adams.

Tez

tezza
April 19th, 2008, 04:02 AM
Oh boy, this is embarrassing.

Even though text-based adventure games were and are my favorite type of game... I've never completed even one!

I've got Zork 1, 2 and 3 on my PC, maybe I'll start playing Zork 1 again just to see if I can finish it. Oh, and without cheating! :-)

Yea, do it! It's very satisfying. You need time though and lots of it.

Tez

CuriousChord
March 31st, 2009, 01:57 PM
I completed at least three without cheating: the original (350 points?), the "Dartmouth campus" version of same (XDART?), and the one with the "traffic light" activated by colored gemstones. It seemed as though the higher the total points got, the less interesting the landscape.

I played other versions, one of which I never completed. It had the BLERBI monster in it, a problem never solved. There was another version that had a password written in a maze when you mapped out your movements on paper. Speaking of which, somewhere in the archives are my original hand-drawn maps of Colossal Cave.

Perhaps the reason I've only played a handful of home computer games is that none of them can compare to Adventure. Colossal Cave still lives in the mind, as opposed to visual worlds that are pre-packaged and provided for consumption. Wolfenstein3D and Samorost are cool but can't even come close to the many hours spent in Colossal Cave.

Cheers! CC

lutiana
April 2nd, 2009, 03:09 PM
Great question. I played alot and finished quite a few. Mostly Sierra and Lucas Arts.

In particular I remember the Quest for Glory series by Sierra and The Monkey Island Series from Lucas Arts.

I don't think I ever completed Maniac Mansion, although I think I got pretty close.

I still own most of these games to.

gerrydoire
April 2nd, 2009, 03:14 PM
Ok, lemme be first.

How many old-style, text-based, Adventure games did you actually complete, without using a cheat sheet or walkthrough?

For me it was all the original Scott Adams Adventures including the two-part Savage Island one (most satisfying).

And I ALMOST managed Zork 1 (98%). I had to cheat to get 100% though.

Gawd I must have had heaps of time back in those days! Either way I was considered very weird by my peers. Those days (1981-83) computer gaming was still pretty much a fringe activity, especially among adults.

Tez

I finished most Kings Quest, Space Quest and Hero's Quest without cheating.

cudasales
April 10th, 2009, 12:03 PM
My first Game that I completed without any cheats was "Tunnels of Doom" on the TI-99/4A.

I also played and finished many of the original SSI Gold Box games such as "Pool of Radiance" and etc. but I would usually go back through them years later with the Clue Book to see what I missed the first time around. :p

barythrin
April 11th, 2009, 04:52 PM
"I also played and finished many of the original SSI Gold Box games such as "Pool of Radiance" and etc. but I would usually go back through them years later with the Clue Book to see what I missed the first time around. :p"

Exact ditto lol

Chuck(G)
April 16th, 2009, 06:06 PM
Only one--and I cheated.

Back sometime around 1975, a friend who worked as an FE for DEC gave me a DECSystem 10 tape (IIRC it was 7-track) with something called "Colossal Cave" on it. At the time, I was working for Control Data.

It took me about a week of company time to (a) read the tape (figured out the the DECSystem 10 wrote its text files as 5 7-bit ASCII characters per 36-bit word--CDC systems used a 6-bit internal code) and (b) convert the DEC FORTRAN to CDC FORTRAN.

I'm lucky I didn't get fired or worse. Adventure made it around the company (and thence to other sites) like wildfire. Thousands of hours were wasted playing it and exchanging notes. System operators were under standing orders to kill the game if it came up and several "search and destroy" purge runs were made on user permanent files.

But then, I had the source code and travel tables...

tezza
April 17th, 2009, 02:42 AM
I'm lucky I didn't get fired or worse. Adventure made it around the company (and thence to other sites) like wildfire. Thousands of hours were wasted playing it and exchanging notes. System operators were under standing orders to kill the game if it came up and several "search and destroy" purge runs were made on user permanent files.
..

Interesting. I was too young to be there when Collosal Cave first did the rounds and I always wondered whether administrators saw it as a time-wasting "virus" as such, or whether they just turned a blind eye to programmers and operators working through it (in their own time of course *cough*).

Tez

docred
April 17th, 2009, 10:51 PM
I played a lot of the old adventure games on various platforms, but I think the only one I actually completed was Adventureland (Scott Adams)...though it seems to me there was one on the Apple II+ I finished, can't remember the name (have to look for it). It was an adventureish type one....hmmm.

Speaking of ones you didn't complete, anyone else play Nethack? Great game, huge dungeon. Its still going strong as far as I know version 3.something.

TSR (D&D AD&D) played lots :) Still have all my first edition stuff on a bookshelf in the spare room...hoping my little guy will want to play when he gets a bit older, lol.

channelmaniac
April 18th, 2009, 03:59 AM
Oh boy... I was addicted to these as a kid...

I played and solved:

Zork I, II, and III (Mapped ALL of these by hand)
Enchanter
Leather Goddesses of Phobos
Space Quest series
King's Quest series
Leisure Suit Larry series

And later:

Myst on the 3DO platform. But, I needed a bit of help in the tunnels on this one.

THE way to play the text based ones was to sacrifice some of the 640K of RAM on the PCjr (512K sidecar for the win!) to a RAM disk and copy the whole 360K game disk to it. Lightning fast disk reads made it much more enjoyable.

scorch
April 19th, 2009, 10:28 AM
You are near a small cave looking east - LOL

Oh Yeah, I used to play on my various S-100 front panel whiz bangs. One of the greats along with Mastermind, Hunt the Wumpus, and Startrek. Does anyone remember the language that was specifically tailored to making adventure games? I remember a language about that time called STOIC, but I don't think that was it.

tezza
April 19th, 2009, 11:00 AM
You are near a small cave looking east - LOL

Oh Yeah, I used to play on my various S-100 front panel whiz bangs. One of the greats along with Mastermind, Hunt the Wumpus, and Startrek. Does anyone remember the language that was specifically tailored to making adventure games? I remember a language about that time called STOIC, but I don't think that was it.

I do remember TAS (The Adventure System) on the TRS-80 Model 1, which allowed you to build adventure games a la the Scott Adams variety.

Tez

TandyMan100
April 23rd, 2009, 11:09 AM
Hitchikers Guide to the Galaxy is the only one I've attempted. Didn't even get half way through.

Beat World of ZZT, though.

barythrin
April 23rd, 2009, 12:16 PM
Did I mention this before? Ok stolen story, but a friend has a funny story of telling his (11yr old at the time maybe?) son when he was showing him his C64 or vic-20 and telling his son about the game Adventure. He was explaining how unlike todays games which make it simpler back then you had to sit down and figure out your map to get around yourself. So he handed over the system and game to his son and said "Here. If you beat the game I'll give you $20." His kid obviously eager to get $20 takes the deal.

A while later (maybe 2 hours) his son comes back with a very interesting (read incorrect) paper resembling a map and says he's confused about ending up in the same spot after going one direction. He explains to his son the world goes around/loops. Fair enough, kid tries for a little longer then comes back "I give up. .. you know.. for a game called Adventure, you'd think there'd be more of it."

Anyway I think after recovering from a mild stroke he decided his kid didn't earn the money and grounded him.

..ok I may have filled some gaps in my memory of the story with slightly embellished details [the end] but it still made me laugh at the time when he told me that. I guess a lot of kids won't respect the art of game play over graphics now adays.

tezza
April 24th, 2009, 02:11 AM
Yes. I think one thing that's often not appreciated is that those very early text-based adventure games were actually written for big kids (i.e Adults). There was a lot of subtle humour in the good ones, and you also needed a lot of patience.

Tez

PrintStar
April 24th, 2009, 06:14 AM
While I always loved the text adventures, I'm pretty sure I only ever beat Wishbringer without cheating. That was a great, although simple, Infocom game. Although only peripherally related, I did manage to beat the three modern Zork games (Return to Zork, Zork Nemesis, and Zork Grand Inquisitor) without cheating as well. I never could get into the point-and-click Sierra-type adventures, though.

On the other hand, adventure games continue to be my genre of choice. I'm a big fan of the Syberia series, and I'm currently working on Syberia II. The Longest Journey series (including Dreamfall) are quite spectacular as well.

As a side note, I try to participate in PyWeek (http://pyweek.org/), a week-long Python game programming competition, whenever I can. Last year, for the March 2008 competition, I wrote a text adventure from scratch, available at http://pyweek.org/e/PrintStarZero/. It didn't fare well in the competition, but it was fun to write.