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Floppies_only
April 26th, 2008, 08:37 AM
Gang,

Could someone please tell me the gender of the nine pin serial connector - which side is male and which side is female?

Thanks in advance,
Sean

Allen
April 26th, 2008, 08:47 AM
The serial port, which is considered a legacy connector, on PCs is a male connector, meaning you will need a female connector to plug into the PC.

Floppies_only
April 26th, 2008, 11:29 AM
The serial port, which is considered a legacy connector.

Thanks, Allen. With that information I was able to tell the folks on the Commodore forum how to make an accessory to protect their computers against static.

When you said that that is a legacy connector, it made me wonder if there is any way to use an old style mouse with a modern computer. I seem to remembers seeing a nine pin serial to PS/2 connector adaptor. Do you think that that would work?

I want to build a "sleeper" system in an IBM PC/AT case (that is missing it's electronics - I won't destroy an AT to make this).

Thanks again,
Sean

Allen
April 26th, 2008, 11:59 AM
Because USB ports have superseded serial, parallel, and PS/2 ports, these older ports are considered "legacy." Legacy meaning outdated computer hardware, but still functional. Many newer desktop PCs don't include these legacy ports, and I haven't seen a new notebook computer with such ports.

You can use the serial port on a modern computer as long as you have the right software (applications and drivers). I haven't used a serial port for 10 years, so I can't say how it can work with today's computers. Previously, I connected two PCs with serial ports using a null modem cable (9-pin female connectors on both ends of the cable). I did this to play deathmatches on Doom.

You mentioned "serial to PS/2 connector adaptor." I assume you mean connecting a PS/2 mouse to a serial port? Adapters are available both ways, but sometimes they don't work. Recently, I could not get a PS/2 mouse connected to a serial port (using an adaptor) to work in DOS. The mouse driver couldn't see a mouse on the serial port. It must have been a compatibility issue with the adaptor.

You shouldn't have any problems connecting a serial mouse to a serial port (without an adaptor) on today's computers.

MikeS
April 26th, 2008, 12:08 PM
<snip>
Recently, I could not get a PS/2 mouse connected to a serial port (using an adaptor) to work in DOS. The mouse driver couldn't see a mouse on the serial port. It must have been a compatibility issue with the adaptor.

You shouldn't have any problems connecting a serial mouse to a serial port (without an adaptor) on today's computers.
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Yes, AFAIK a serial mouse still works on a serial port (if your system has one).

But the PS/2 > Serial adapters only work with dual-mode mice such as many Logitechs; the normal adapters only convert the pinout but don't actually convert PS/2 signals to serial.

m

Floppies_only
April 26th, 2008, 12:24 PM
You mentioned "serial to PS/2 connector adaptor." I assume you mean connecting a PS/2 mouse to a serial port? Adapters are available both ways, but sometimes they don't work..

What I had in mind was to use the original Microsoft mouse for the IBM PC, with a 25 pin serial connector, with a brand new computer.


You shouldn't have any problems connecting a serial mouse to a serial port (without an adaptor) on today's computers.

I will ask the builder to include a serial port on the computer.

Thanks Allan and Mike,
Sean

carlsson
April 26th, 2008, 12:50 PM
I believe there are a bunch of serial to USB adapters, which implement RS232 in various degrees of portability. By the way, I used the serial port on my newish (2006) PC as late as last year, and has a serial cable waiting for any time I need to plug in my C2N232I.

Vlad
April 26th, 2008, 02:34 PM
I've seen both PCI and PCI Express serial port cards. So if you get a motherboard thats modern enough to not have any at all, its not that expensive to buy a card if you wanted the actual ports.

Micom 2000
April 27th, 2008, 10:57 AM
I was of the impression that you could only use an adaptor for USB to serial. Wouldn't the reverse require some sort of alteration to the BIOS ? Would older BIOS's even support that ?

If so that would solve a lot of problems of attaching a GPS receiver to my older LTs and Notepads, since the older serial GPS devices are becoming harder to come by, while USB GPS devices are plentiful.

Lawrence


I believe there are a bunch of serial to USB adapters, which implement RS232 in various degrees of portability. By the way, I used the serial port on my newish (2006) PC as late as last year, and has a serial cable waiting for any time I need to plug in my C2N232I.

carlsson
April 27th, 2008, 03:10 PM
Err, I meant that by using an adapter, you could in theory connect an old, serial device to a new computer only equipped with USB. Not the other way around. Actually, the level of compatibility varies from adapter to adapter I've heard.

MikeS
April 27th, 2008, 10:48 PM
I was of the impression that you could only use an adaptor for USB to serial. Wouldn't the reverse require some sort of alteration to the BIOS ? Would older BIOS's even support that ?

If so that would solve a lot of problems of attaching a GPS receiver to my older LTs and Notepads, since the older serial GPS devices are becoming harder to come by, while USB GPS devices are plentiful.

Lawrence
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PCMCIA?

m

Micom 2000
April 28th, 2008, 02:10 AM
Unfortunately without PCMCIA. Ones a Grid 1520, and the other's a Dauphin DTR1 notepad which I would like with GPS.
Serial GPS receivers used to come up all the time on E-Pay, now they're rarely seen.

Lawrence


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PCMCIA?

m