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Floppies_only
June 6th, 2008, 01:03 AM
Gang,

I am reading the book named in the title of this message. It was a guide for people to use to decide if and what type of computer was right for them. The book says that the Apple ][ is suitable for games and general purpose computing.

The way I remember it, it seemed like back in the early 'eighties you could get software to do _anything_ on an Apple ][. I am wondering if they were able to do what it takes to run a business (small or medium sized)?

The book lists the computerized functions of a business as: Accounts Receivable, Accounts Payable, Inventory, and word processing. Do you guys think that an Apple could have handled all of that?

Thanks,
Sean

Great Hierophant
June 6th, 2008, 04:56 AM
It certainly can. Apple IIs can run word processing and spreadsheet programs. Granted they may not have all the bells and whistles of todays Word or WordPerfect, but they will get the job done for most users. I am sure they can run database programs as well.

Speaking of which, there are a pair of Apple IIe Platinums currently in use in my eye doctor's office. The receptionists believed that one of the surgeons used them to run his custom software.

Floppies_only
June 7th, 2008, 01:45 AM
>[Apple ][s can run business software]

How do Apple ][ keyboards stand up to A) Modern PC keyboards, and B) The keyboard on a Commodore 64? My Dad had an Apple but that was before I learned to type.

Also, can anybody remember the name of the software that gives an Apple ][ the "look and feel" of a Macintosh? I saw screenshots of it on eBay, they definitely made it.

Thanks in advance.

vbriel
June 7th, 2008, 09:36 AM
You might be thinking of GSOS. It is the Apple II GS system that has the look and feel of a Mac.

Vince

Floppies_only
June 7th, 2008, 04:28 PM
You might be thinking of GSOS. It is the Apple II GS system that has the look and feel of a Mac.

Vince

I just looked at the Apple II GS on wikipedia and that definitely was not it. What I remember was a regular Apple II, running software that made it look like a Mac. It was on eBay, a long time ago.

Sean

magnusfalkirk
June 7th, 2008, 07:21 PM
I just looked at the Apple II GS on wikipedia and that definitely was not it. What I remember was a regular Apple II, running software that made it look like a Mac. It was on eBay, a long time ago.

Sean

What you might be thinking of is a program called MouseDesk for the Apple II.

Dean

Floppies_only
June 7th, 2008, 11:15 PM
What you might be thinking of is a program called MouseDesk for the Apple II.

Dean

That's it. Also known as Apple ][ Desktop (according to websites). When I saw it on eBay, it has a wysiwyg word processor and a draw program like MacDraw or the draw program that came with Windows version one.

Is there a way to transfer word processor or plain text files between an Apple ][ and an IBM PC with 5 1/4" floppies?

Thanks,
Sean

Dwight Elvey
June 8th, 2008, 07:03 AM
Hi
Apple IIs used a completely different floppy low level format.
Unless one had a CatWeasle ( sp?) one could not do such a thing.
It makes more sense to transfer things through a serial port.
It also makes more sense to use pain text. Most word processors
have different formats as well.
Dwight

Floppies_only
June 8th, 2008, 07:16 AM
Hi
Apple IIs used a completely different floppy low level format.
Unless one had a CatWeasle ( sp?) one could not do such a thing.
It makes more sense to transfer things through a serial port.
It also makes more sense to use pain text. Most word processors
have different formats as well.
Dwight

Dwight,

I am really interested in being able to do this.

Could you paste word processor text into a terminal window? Or would it be better to save the file as plaintext and then send it with the terminal and a null modem adaptor/cable?

Which programs could you use to do it, if you don't mind saying?

Thanks,
Sean

MikeS
June 8th, 2008, 04:37 PM
A device that I've found useful on many occasions is a parallel > serial converter, for those systems that don't have a serial port or communication software, but do have print capability; just capture printer output with your PC's terminal software.

m