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Floppies_only
June 7th, 2008, 01:53 AM
Gang,

I have finally got around to transcribing the notes for my book on my Commodore 64. The keyboard is driving me nuts. It seems that every time I type "the" I get "thte". This has never happened to me before, while using many different keyboards over the last ten years. Does anybody know what the cause is, and if there is a fix?

Thanks,
Sean

carlsson
June 7th, 2008, 11:24 AM
I believe there are bugs in the keyboard decoding. It happens to me once in a while too, some key combinations typed too quickly give the same results.

Floppies_only
June 7th, 2008, 11:59 PM
Anders,

I was trying to talk my Mother into buying a computer so that she can get online yesterday. I told her that I meet interesting and helpful people from all over the world through the internet. Then I used this post that you made as an example of that. Thanks for being so awesome :)

Sean

carlsson
June 8th, 2008, 12:09 AM
I don't think I've encountered the same phenomenon on my VIC-20's or PETs though. I should compare the breadbox C64 to the C64C. Perhaps the bug lies in the 6526 CIA? *scratches head*

Floppies_only
June 8th, 2008, 07:58 AM
Perhaps the bug lies in the 6526 CIA? *scratches head*

Maybe if it was bad code in the BIOS, an eprom could be flashed to replace the chip with the bad code.

Sean

P.S.: I read an old message you wrote about the high price of gas and only filling at unmanned gas stations. At first I thought you ment "self service only" but then I realized that you probably meant that there was no person who worked at the station. Here in the states, the profit margin on gasoline is non-existant, so the stations only make money if they sell you junk food. And since we are Americans, we all seem to eat lots of junk food :)

Sean

P.S.: Gas here is something like U.S.$4.00 per gallon now. I don't have a car, myself.

Bungo Pony
June 9th, 2008, 04:47 AM
I'm also pretty sure there are bugs in the keyboard decoding. I seem to recall some common typos that would pop up from typing too fast on the C-64. Not sure if they fixed it when they revised the C-64.

tezza
June 9th, 2008, 05:10 PM
Gang,

I have finally got around to transcribing the notes for my book on my Commodore 64. The keyboard is driving me nuts. It seems that every time I type "the" I get "thte". This has never happened to me before, while using many different keyboards over the last ten years. Does anybody know what the cause is, and if there is a fix?

Thanks,
Sean

Sean,

Do you really want to write your book using the C-64? Bugs not withstanding I've used many keyboards over the years also and the C-64 has to have one of the WORST full-stroke keyboards I've ever experienced! It sits way too high and the keys have a very mushy feel. Personally, I'd get frustrated typing on it for any length of time.

I'm assuming you want that authentic feeling? Back in the day, the C-64 was an awesome games and entertainment machine. It is indeed a classic. However, with its 40 column screen and soft keyboard it was not the word processor of choice for most people (unless this was all they could afford of course).

Tez

vwestlife
June 9th, 2008, 05:33 PM
I have finally got around to transcribing the notes for my book on my Commodore 64. The keyboard is driving me nuts. It seems that every time I type "the" I get "thte". This has never happened to me before, while using many different keyboards over the last ten years. Does anybody know what the cause is, and if there is a fix?
Is it generating the extra unwanted letters only when you type quickly, or every time you press certain letter keys? If it only happens when you type quickly, that is known as "key bounce" is a problem common to many older 8-bit computers (the TRS-80 Model I was especially well-known for it). If it happens every time you press certain keys, that means something is wrong with the keyboard or its connection; try opening the computer and unplugging the keyboard cable and then plugging it back in.

Floppies_only
June 9th, 2008, 07:41 PM
Sean,

Do you really want to write your book using the C-64?

Tez,

I read your review and really liked it. Thanks. I am going to take all of your suggestions, starting with this post.

What follows is a long and highly detailed explanation of why my answer to Tez's question is that I will be using a PC to write my book. It is really more suitable as a blog entry, but is included to show how to use both of these computers together.

As far as using my C64 goes, the original plan was just to type the notes (40 pages) for the book on it and then convert them to an IBM PC text file using "Big Blue Reader" and a 1571 floppy drive. But after I set the C64 up, for some reason I decided that I would just type the eight minutes of notes that I made on a microcassette recorder that I carry with me everywhere I go (when I'm on the move I use it, otherwise I use a notepad - it's hard to write while walking).

But when I found the keyboard bug I decided that I would just use the first half of the eight minutes that I actually typed in during that session.

Right now the plan is to set up the 1571 and do the file conversion, then store the '64 and use the desk space for my birthday present from my Mom. It's a Brainiac home computer from the fifties.

After I get done doing that, I will eventually write the book on a 5150 IBM PC with 5151 monochrome display (the green screen) running Microsoft Works for DOS version two.

I just stopped corresponding on USENET so that I will have time.

Sean, living the dream :)

tezza
June 9th, 2008, 08:00 PM
Tez,

After I get done doing that, I will eventually write the book on a 5150 IBM PC with 5151 monochrome display (the green screen) running Microsoft Works for DOS version two.

Sean, living the dream :)

Now, if we are talking vintage computers, I enjoyed writing on THAT keyboard. The only nark was (is) the small Shift keys. They are not quite in the place you expect and it's easy to miss them.

I love the clicky tactile response of the keys though, the clear characters and the rock-steady display of the old IBM mono green screen.

It was a real joy to move to this for serious work in 1983-1984, after using (flakey) home computers for so long up to then. :)

Tez

Druid6900
June 9th, 2008, 08:13 PM
Could be worse, you could be writing using an Atari 400 or some other membrane type keyboard or, even worse still, the CoCo chicklet keyboard, both, of course, a VAST improvement over trying to do it on an early Newton :)

vwestlife
June 9th, 2008, 08:35 PM
Now, if we are talking vintage computers, I enjoyed writing on THAT keyboard. The only nark was (is) the small Shift keys. They are not quite in the place you expect and it's easy to miss them.

I love the clicky tactile response of the keys though, the clear characters and the rock-steady display of the old IBM mono green screen.

It was a real joy to move to this for serious work in 1983-1984, after using (flakey) home computers for so long up to then. :)
The original PC with WordStar is an excellent writer's machine. However, I got my own start as a kid on a NEC PC-8001A (the "A" designating the American version of the Japanese PC-8001). It was an excellent CP/M-compatible computer with an extremely solid metal case, and its keyboard had a very nice light but also very solid feel. I did most of my middle school book reports on it using WordStar and the matching NEC PC-8023 dot matrix printer. As you can see it had no dedicated cursor keys, so you had to use the WordStar ^E/^S/^D/^X cursor key diamond to move around the screen.

http://www.computercloset.org/NEC_PC-8001A.jpg

More info on the PC-8001A:
http://www.computercloset.org/NECPC8001A.htm

It doesn't actually use the real Zilog Z80 chip; it uses a NEC clone. Mine had an add-on called "The Wedge" by Renaissance Technologies which fit into place under they keyboard unit and provided disk and printer interfaces without needing NEC's bulky expansion unit box, and also provided a multivoice sound chip and four Atari joystick ports.

tezza
June 10th, 2008, 12:47 AM
Now that is a real vintage machine.

I've actually got a monitor for an NEC 8001a but not the computer itself. I acquired it thinking I was getting a VGA monitor. Opps, my mistake. I'm not even sure it goes. I dont get a raster when it's powered up.

I always wondered why NEC numbered their computers the way they did? Why 8001?

Tez

Floppies_only
June 16th, 2008, 11:18 PM
It seems that every time I type "the" I get "thte".

I have thought about this and have come to the conclusion that just ignoring these misspelings until it is time to spell check is the way to go. I am not sure if I will type in the rest of my notes on the Commodore, but if I do I will just use Work's "replace all" feature to take care of the problem while I am watching TV. Because "the" is the only word that my Commodore changes to something else.

Sean