PDA

View Full Version : How to format a new disk?



Floppies_only
June 22nd, 2008, 04:13 AM
Gang,

I have the 1541 manual and I read at college level, but I can't figure out how to format a disk for my C64. Can anyone tell me? If I can get down I'd like to copy files from one disk drive to the other. Can anyone tell me how to do that? The drives are device 8 and 9.

Thanks in advance,
Sean

ahm
June 22nd, 2008, 05:22 AM
I can't imagine Google wasn't able to find it for you. Did you try?

For my search, this was among the top 5 hits.
It seems to answer both your questions at once:
http://www.c64-wiki.com/index.php/VC-1541#With_BASIC-Commands

TroyW
June 22nd, 2008, 06:02 AM
Don't forget to bake the disks in your oven at 350 degrees for 20 minutes first :twisted:

billdeg
June 22nd, 2008, 01:13 PM
I don't think it's necessary to bake disks without a reason first. A new disk or nice shape disk should be OK enough for a 1541 disk drive, they're forgiving.

I tend to use utilities to format disks, but I *think* the command is

OPEN 1,8,15,"N:mydisk, ID" [enter]
CLOSE 1 [enter]

listen for a soft click, click, click, etc as the disk is formatting. Forgive me if I am wrong, but I must be close.

where "mydisk" is the name you give the disk. Keep within 16 chars.

bd

carlsson
June 22nd, 2008, 11:08 PM
Beware that the file copy command only works within one disk drive device, i.e. if you had a dual floppy drive like the IEEE-488 drives on the PET side you could copy files from one drive to the other, but you can't use it to copy file between two different devices. Therefore you'll have to obtain some software that can copy files. On the good side, most of those programs will work with only one floppy drive too, swapping disks. Of course you can always load files into memory and save them by hand if they are of the Basic loadable kind.

Floppies_only
June 23rd, 2008, 04:48 AM
Don't forget to bake the disks in your oven at 350 degrees for 20 minutes first :twisted:

Well, that just don't make a lick of sense. I heard from a reliable source that you're supposed to sprinkle iron filings on the side you are using to increase the corvicey (they stick because it's a magnetic device), and pop them in the toaster to make the disk nice and crisp.

Sean

MikeS
June 23rd, 2008, 07:27 AM
Well, that just don't make a lick of sense. I heard from a reliable source that you're supposed to sprinkle iron filings on the side you are using to increase the corvicey (they stick because it's a magnetic device), and pop them in the toaster to make the disk nice and crisp.

Sean
---
Basically correct, but the correct term is coercivity; nothing tastier than some roasted Oersteds!

m

Bungo Pony
June 23rd, 2008, 09:45 AM
Lemme try from memory...


OPEN 15,8,15: PRINT#15,"N:DISK NAME, ID#22"
CLOSE 15

Choose any ID number and disk name you like


If I can get down I'd like to copy files from one disk drive to the other. Can anyone tell me how to do that?

For BASIC programs, I just load them into RAM, insert a new disk, and then save them. I have a BASIC program at home that I typed in from a book which will do entire disk copies. If you need to copy entire files or programs that aren't BASIC programs, I know that some fastload cartridges have these utilities built into them.

Also, you could use a PC to do the copying, although you'll have to get (or make) a cable that connects to your parallel port.

carlsson
June 23rd, 2008, 10:11 AM
The ID string can only be two characters. Well, actually you can store five characters on the disk, but not by using the NEW command. When you format the disk, it is imprinted which DOS version you used next to the ID. You can use a disk editor to overwrite these values, but beware of software that like to check the DOS version and may fail if there is something else than e.g. 2A in that field.

You have a few file copying programs here. I don't know which are good or will fit your purposes.
http://www.zimmers.net/anonftp/pub/cbm/c64/diskutil/filecopy/

Arkhan
June 23rd, 2008, 05:47 PM
OPEN 1,8,15,"N0:<name>,<id>"
CLOSE 1

I forget the difference between 1 and 15 in terms of OPEN and CLOSE.... but they both should work.

omit the <>s obviously.

carlsson
June 23rd, 2008, 10:33 PM
The syntax is OPEN channel,device,subchannel

Channel is a reference number only used by the computer. I think it can be any number 1-255 and does not matter as long as you don't mix up the channels.

Device obviously is the device number: 0 for keyboard, 1 for tape, 2 for RS-232, 3 for screen, 4/5 for printer, 8-11 for disk drive. Other devices could listen to other numbers.

Subchannel is only used with a couple of peripherals, like the disk drive. Subchannels 1-14 could be used when working with multiple sequential files on the same drive, I believe. Subchannel 15 is the special command channel, used to send all the jobs and commands to the drive.

So OPEN 1,8,15 and OPEN 15,8,15 are identical in this respect. The first is easier to type, the second is easier to remember which is the command channel.

Floppies_only
June 26th, 2008, 12:52 PM
The syntax is OPEN channel,device,subchannel

Channel is a reference number only used by the computer. I think it can be any number 1-255 and does not matter as long as you don't mix up the channels.

Device obviously is the device number: 0 for keyboard, 1 for tape, 2 for RS-232, 3 for screen, 4/5 for printer, 8-11 for disk drive. Other devices could listen to other numbers.

Subchannel is only used with a couple of peripherals, like the disk drive. Subchannels 1-14 could be used when working with multiple sequential files on the same drive, I believe. Subchannel 15 is the special command channel, used to send all the jobs and commands to the drive.

So OPEN 1,8,15 and OPEN 15,8,15 are identical in this respect. The first is easier to type, the second is easier to remember which is the command channel.

Thanks Anders. I understand it now, wereas when I read the manual I was just left with the thought that "maybe real computers are too hard for me". But now I get it. So much better than "Google is your friend".

Sean