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Amigaz
August 10th, 2008, 12:21 AM
Felt I had to get an EISA motherboard aftering seeing one on Ebay I could resist to snipe :cool:
What I didn't know about these beast is that you need a EISA config disk to set up the system when changing cards etc..can these still be found or am i "cooked"?
There's no model name or anything on the motherboard (as usual) just the "Made in Taiwan"....wonder how people put up with paying lotsa $$ for unbranded stuff back then :confused:

Tinkerer
August 10th, 2008, 01:09 AM
You can often find the mother board manufacturer by looking up the chipset.

Anonymous Coward
August 10th, 2008, 04:05 AM
The EISA config files are all out there, you just need to look. Several years ago I found a few large archives, but I haven't saved the bookmarks since I didn't buy any new EISA cards and have all the files I need. I'll be happy to help you look if you need help.

Can you post a picture of your board? Most of the EISA boards that I have seen are made in the USA and are very high quality. Though, I've seen a few asian "mini EISA" boards that don't support the full EISA implementation.

Amigaz
August 10th, 2008, 10:58 AM
You can often find the mother board manufacturer by looking up the chipset.

Think it has some SiS 4xx numbered chips...will look into it tomorrow

Amigaz
August 10th, 2008, 11:00 AM
The EISA config files are all out there, you just need to look. Several years ago I found a few large archives, but I haven't saved the bookmarks since I didn't buy any new EISA cards and have all the files I need. I'll be happy to help you look if you need help.

Can you post a picture of your board? Most of the EISA boards that I have seen are made in the USA and are very high quality. Though, I've seen a few asian "mini EISA" boards that don't support the full EISA implementation.

That would be awesome if you could help me out with those files...I've done a mega google search after EISA config stuff without any success

I'll take some nice photos tomorrow of the mobo and post here..

It now feels like there's hope for this motherboard :)

mikey99
August 10th, 2008, 06:36 PM
I have a HINT EISA G486HVL motherboard and would like to know where
to find the EISA config utility. Hopefully its in that database mentioned
earlier :-) Thanks.

Anonymous Coward
August 10th, 2008, 08:07 PM
Mikey99, do you just need the ECU, or do you also need the CFG and OVL files that go with your motherboard? I think yours is the http://www.lemmus.eu/th99/m/I-L/31129.htm. In the case of the configuration files you may have a problem, but the utility itself is widely available online. Usually the best thing to do when you can't find the exact configuration files you need is to use one from a board that uses the same chipset (in your case HiNT). I'll keep my eyes open for the files you need (!GIT0001.CFG or !HIT0001.CFG).

From what I read, HiNT isn't really a good implementation of EISA. Have a read:

2.43 What disadvantages are there to the HiNT EISA chip set?

[From: ralf@alum.wpi.edu (Ralph Valentino)]

The HiNT Caesar Chip Set (CS8001 & CS8002) can come in three different configurations. All three of these configurations have EISA style connectors and are (sometimes incorrectly) sold as EISA motherboards. The differences should be carefully noted, though.

The rarest of these configuration uses a combination of the first HiNT chip (CS8001) and the Intel chip set. This configuration can support the full EISA functionality: 32 address bits, 32 data bits, level sensitive (sharable) interrupts, full EISA DMA, watch dog (sanity) timer, and so forth.

The second configuration is called Super-ISA, which uses both of the HiNT chips. This configuration is very common in low-end models. It supports a very limited functionality: 24 address bits, 32 data bits, edge triggered (non-sharable) interrupts, ISA (16 data, 24 address) DMA, and no watch dog timer. Some EISA boards, such as the Adaptec 1742A EISA Fast SCSI-2 host adapter, can be configured to work in this mode by hacking their EISA configuration file (.CFG) to turn off these features. Other EISA cards require these features and are therefore unusable in these systems.

The final configuration is called Pragmatic EISA, or P-EISA. Like Super-ISA, both HiNT chips are used but external support logic (buffers and such) are added to provide a somewhat increased functionality: 32 address bits, 32 data bits, edge triggered (non-sharable) interrupts, ISA (16 data, 24 address) DMA, and no watch dog timer. The full 32 bits for address and data allow bus mastering devices access to the complete range of main memory. As with Super-ISA, there may be incompatibilities with some EISA cards.



It seems that the archive I found in the past is no longer online. I think it may have been located here:

http://lin.fsid.cvut.cz/ftp/drivers/eisa/ <---gone


Sometimes I also use this website, as there are a few CFG files floating around:

http://www.mpoli.fi/files

Unknown_K
August 10th, 2008, 08:56 PM
That EISA file site you listed that is gone is archived at www.archive.org, just copy that link to get to it (last revised in 2001 I think).

Amigaz
August 10th, 2008, 10:36 PM
So how does this EISA config stuff work? do you program a ROM chip on the motherboard with some utility?

Amigaz
August 11th, 2008, 01:02 AM
Ok, guys

Here's some pics..hope you can help me identify this mobo

http://img501.imageshack.us/img501/8393/helaez6.jpg

http://img137.imageshack.us/img137/3253/nedrebq1.jpg

http://img178.imageshack.us/img178/3721/vrezz2.jpg

http://img505.imageshack.us/img505/4418/textzg9.jpg



btw. noticed that this mobo hs a 50mhz FSB clock crystal....maybe I can beef her up with a step down voltage socket and put an AMD 5x86 in it :mrgreen:


The cache ram is located in a long vertical row just on top of the empty CPU socket, didn't want to remove the motherboard from the case when I took the pics..
Here's a pic from the auction I won it in

http://i17.ebayimg.com/07/i/000/fe/4f/a749_1.JPG

Anonymous Coward
August 11th, 2008, 02:58 AM
Amigaz, your board looks very similar to UnknownK's EISA 486 board. If for whatever reason you can't locate the exact EISA config file for your board, the one for UnknownK's board should work for you. They both use the SIS406 EISA chipset and have AMI BIOS. SIS406 is a damn nice chipset. The memory scores on my SIS406 board are among the highest I've seen on a pre PCI 486 board.

I just wanted to add that I found a link of 386 and 486 chipset/bios manuals.

http://www.filewatcher.com/b/ftp/63.147.10.6/archive/Other_Manuals.0.0.html

Amigaz
August 11th, 2008, 09:15 AM
Amigaz, your board looks very similar to UnknownK's EISA 486 board. If for whatever reason you can't locate the exact EISA config file for your board, the one for UnknownK's board should work for you. They both use the SIS406 EISA chipset and have AMI BIOS. SIS406 is a damn nice chipset. The memory scores on my SIS406 board are among the highest I've seen on a pre PCI 486 board.

I just wanted to add that I found a link of 386 and 486 chipset/bios manuals.

http://www.filewatcher.com/b/ftp/63.147.10.6/archive/Other_Manuals.0.0.html

Thanks! :)

One question though...how do I "use" these configs and which one did UnknownK use?

Unknown_K
August 11th, 2008, 10:21 AM
Slightly different from mine, I have 2 Dallas chips, and my slots are all EISA while he has 2 ISA (different placement of parts as well).

I can email the EISA configuration files I have, just PM me your email.

The EISA setup sees my board as a prototype and doesn't have much to configure, but it does allow you to setup EISA cards which is something you need to do if you have any.

Amigaz
August 13th, 2008, 10:53 AM
haha!

Thanks to you guys I'm up an running now with this board and my Ultrastor 24F and Elsa Winner 1000 card are properly configured

Now the fun starts :cool:

Anonymous Coward
August 14th, 2008, 12:42 AM
I'm really glad everything worked out well for you, and I'm happy that now there's another member running an EISA system. EISA users are probably about as uncommon as MCA users. On the surface EISA doesn't really appear to be much better than ISA, but when you get a couple of nice EISA cards in there you can see that it's really great since you don't have all kinds of board stinking up the memory area just under 16mb. Personally I find EISA graphics board to be pretty quick also, and it's a real shame that there isn't much to choose from, that's why sometimes it's nice to have one or two VLB slots as well so you can run both buses at the same time.

The ELSA winner 1000 is one of the better boards for EISA. I have the Winner 2000 which is the same card but with 4mb. I was surprised how fast the S3 928 chipset is on an EISA bus. It's just a real shame the DOS performance isn't too good because of the VRAM.

You might want to consider a new SCSI host adapter though. I don't know that the Ultrastor is really such a great board. It's usually not to hard to find a good HP, buslogic or adaptec host adapter for EISA.

Unknown_K
August 14th, 2008, 12:53 AM
The 24F has some cache on the card to speed things up, come to think of it I think I have that board too as a spare (currently using a caching IDE EISA card with 16MB of cache).

Amigaz if you have the original driver disks for the ultrastor 24F I would like some disk images (Winimage would be fine) of them.

Unknown_K
August 14th, 2008, 12:54 AM
I'm really glad everything worked out well for you, and I'm happy that now there's another member running an EISA system. EISA users are probably about as uncommon as MCA users. On the surface EISA doesn't really appear to be much better than ISA, but when you get a couple of nice EISA cards in there you can see that it's really great since you don't have all kinds of board stinking up the memory area just under 16mb. Personally I find EISA graphics board to be pretty quick also, and it's a real shame that there isn't much to choose from, that's why sometimes it's nice to have one or two VLB slots as well so you can run both buses at the same time.

The ELSA winner 1000 is one of the better boards for EISA. I have the Winner 2000 which is the same card but with 4mb. I was surprised how fast the S3 928 chipset is on an EISA bus. It's just a real shame the DOS performance isn't too good because of the VRAM.

You might want to consider a new SCSI host adapter though. I don't know that the Ultrastor is really such a great board. It's usually not to hard to find a good HP, buslogic or adaptec host adapter for EISA.


So did you go to the Olympics (your in China currently)?

Anonymous Coward
August 14th, 2008, 03:42 AM
No, I really have no interest in going to Beijing. I moved all the way out to southwest Yunnan province just to escape the nasty pollution along the east coast. I'm also pretty pissed off about all the changes immigration policy due to the olympic games that have been wasting a lot of my time and money. I've been watching some of the games on TV though. The opening ceremony was pretty good (CG fireworks and all).

Anyway, to get back to the topic of EISA. I am not really sure that having a caching controller is very useful on an EISA system. I would think that because EISA is pretty good at bus mastering, having more memory on the motherboard would be more useful. Then again I've never used an EISA caching controller. Do you have any good comparisons?

Unknown_K
August 14th, 2008, 11:52 AM
I would think cache on the card would be usefull under some use, would have to do benchmarks under different setups to realy know.

Hopefully there are some old magazines articles around that showed the benefits of cache on that particular card when it was new. Still using a newer wide card and newer SCSI drive would probably squash any speed gains the older 50 pin card with cache would have.

Amigaz
August 16th, 2008, 01:51 AM
I'm really glad everything worked out well for you, and I'm happy that now there's another member running an EISA system. EISA users are probably about as uncommon as MCA users. On the surface EISA doesn't really appear to be much better than ISA, but when you get a couple of nice EISA cards in there you can see that it's really great since you don't have all kinds of board stinking up the memory area just under 16mb. Personally I find EISA graphics board to be pretty quick also, and it's a real shame that there isn't much to choose from, that's why sometimes it's nice to have one or two VLB slots as well so you can run both buses at the same time.

The ELSA winner 1000 is one of the better boards for EISA. I have the Winner 2000 which is the same card but with 4mb. I was surprised how fast the S3 928 chipset is on an EISA bus. It's just a real shame the DOS performance isn't too good because of the VRAM.

You might want to consider a new SCSI host adapter though. I don't know that the Ultrastor is really such a great board. It's usually not to hard to find a good HP, buslogic or adaptec host adapter for EISA.

Yeah, the DOS performance is quite dissapointing....have benchmarked the performance with differenr programs...I get around 3-5mb/s

I've already went for another SCSI controller :mrgreen: an Adaptec AHA 2742AT...waiting for it to arrive in the mail
The Ultrastor 24F is rock solid though, have it hooked up to an IDE drive with a 50pin SCSI--> IDE adapter....a Plextor Ultraplex 40x cd-rom drive
What made me go for the Adaptec card is that the Ultrastor is a full length card which isn't good for the airflow inside my cramped case and it seem to have a 1gig limit even with Ontrack Disk Manager (latest version)

Amigaz
August 16th, 2008, 01:52 AM
The 24F has some cache on the card to speed things up, come to think of it I think I have that board too as a spare (currently using a caching IDE EISA card with 16MB of cache).

Amigaz if you have the original driver disks for the ultrastor 24F I would like some disk images (Winimage would be fine) of them.

Wish I had the disks :( , I downloaded them as zipped archives from some website
Have the original disks for my Elsa Winner 1000 though :cool:

Amigaz
August 16th, 2008, 01:57 AM
Here's what my setup looks now....mini towers are great but when it comes to rig them up with SCSI and gaming cards it get pretty crowded as you can see
btw. are we only 3 EISA users here now?

http://img171.imageshack.us/img171/5549/insidapg3.jpg

http://img209.imageshack.us/img209/791/bakyj5.jpg

Anonymous Coward
August 16th, 2008, 03:14 AM
I think there are one or two others in this forum that use EISA systems. I wish there were more though.

Your hd transfer speed is probably being limited by your disk drive rather than the controller. The Adaptec AHA-2742AT is a pretty decent controller...but what you really should have gotten is a 2742W. I saw one in an eBay store the other day that was pretty cheap. I also saw a wide SCSI Compaq controller that looked pretty nice.With the 2742AT you're going to be capped at 10mb/sec. I don't know if it's realistically possible to get much more than that out of a 486 though, since I haven't had a chance to try a high-density, high-rpm SCSI drive out with my wide controller. I'll have to try out some of these things when I have some cash to blow.

Your setup looks pretty good, but I think a larger case would be the way to go. I have my stuff in a full profile AT desktop at the moment, and it's still pretty crowded with all of my full length EISA and ISA boards. I'm considering moving everything over to a tower configuration.

Amigaz
August 16th, 2008, 01:50 PM
I think there are one or two others in this forum that use EISA systems. I wish there were more though.

Your hd transfer speed is probably being limited by your disk drive rather than the controller. The Adaptec AHA-2742AT is a pretty decent controller...but what you really should have gotten is a 2742W. I saw one in an eBay store the other day that was pretty cheap. I also saw a wide SCSI Compaq controller that looked pretty nice.With the 2742AT you're going to be capped at 10mb/sec. I don't know if it's realistically possible to get much more than that out of a 486 though, since I haven't had a chance to try a high-density, high-rpm SCSI drive out with my wide controller. I'll have to try out some of these things when I have some cash to blow.

Your setup looks pretty good, but I think a larger case would be the way to go. I have my stuff in a full profile AT desktop at the moment, and it's still pretty crowded with all of my full length EISA and ISA boards. I'm considering moving everything over to a tower configuration.

Think i saw that Compaq 68pin Wide SCSI controller, think it's overkill though since my 50mhz 486DX can't cope
I wonder if I can fit a 5 --> 3.3volt CPU adapter and an AMD 5x86 in my system?

Wish I had another "old school" full AT tower with a nice MHZ display, rocker style power button etc ;)

You have any pic's of your EISA setup?

Druid6900
August 16th, 2008, 02:03 PM
Think i saw that Compaq 68pin Wide SCSI controller, think it's overkill though since my 50mhz 486DX can't cope
I wonder if I can fit a 5 --> 3.3volt CPU adapter and an AMD 5x86 in my system?

Wish I had another "old school" full AT tower with a nice MHZ display, rocker style power button etc ;)

You have any pic's of your EISA setup?

Wish you had have said something a week ago. I just scrapped a 9 device full tower case with 4 digit display (extracted the working PSU first) and pedestal base.

Sucker was so big it had extensions on the motherboard power connections.

I also have a ISA/EISA motherboard and a WD1007 controller, but, I'm not actually doing anything with them.

Amigaz
August 16th, 2008, 03:10 PM
Wish you had have said something a week ago. I just scrapped a 9 device full tower case with 4 digit display (extracted the working PSU first) and pedestal base.

Sucker was so big it had extensions on the motherboard power connections.

I also have a ISA/EISA motherboard and a WD1007 controller, but, I'm not actually doing anything with them.

Really? damn....my timing is never 100% when it comes to laying my hands on nice hardware :o

Anonymous Coward
August 16th, 2008, 04:30 PM
The VRM should be no problem. I'm using one in my EISA configuration with an am5x86 at the moment and it works very well. I tried 5x86 at 3x50MHz too. It works fine, but the L2 cache needs more wait states and ends up being slower than 4x40 in the end.

I actually don't have photos of my full setup, but I do have one or two pictures.

The motherboard:
http://picasaweb.google.com/misterzeropage/MyVintageComputerStuff/photo#5078749493938014530

This is an ELSA Winner 2000 I replaced with a SuperMac Spectrum/24
http://picasaweb.google.com/misterzeropage/MyVintageComputerStuff/photo#5108132668792222658

This is a full tower case I want to use (needs a little fixing up)

http://picasaweb.google.com/misterzeropage/MyVintageComputerStuff/photo#5204484585200514354

Druid6900
August 16th, 2008, 09:30 PM
Really? damn....my timing is never 100% when it comes to laying my hands on nice hardware :o

I believe I mentioned it around the same time I offered up a pair of beautiful full-sized AT desktop cases that ended up being scrapped anyway, so, I don't bother anymore.

Just as well, the shipping to Sweden would have been horrendous, especially with the switchable PSU re-installed. It was pretty heavy gauge metal.

Amigaz
August 17th, 2008, 12:38 AM
The VRM should be no problem. I'm using one in my EISA configuration with an am5x86 at the moment and it works very well. I tried 5x86 at 3x50MHz too. It works fine, but the L2 cache needs more wait states and ends up being slower than 4x40 in the end.

I actually don't have photos of my full setup, but I do have one or two pictures.

The motherboard:
http://picasaweb.google.com/misterzeropage/MyVintageComputerStuff/photo#5078749493938014530

This is an ELSA Winner 2000 I replaced with a SuperMac Spectrum/24
http://picasaweb.google.com/misterzeropage/MyVintageComputerStuff/photo#5108132668792222658

This is a full tower case I want to use (needs a little fixing up)

http://picasaweb.google.com/misterzeropage/MyVintageComputerStuff/photo#5204484585200514354

So you're running yours with stepped down voltage?

My EISA board is pretty early, the only CPU related jumper it has is a jumper to change between different CPU sorts...no multiplier or voltage jumpper to be seen.
I guess it was made when the 486 boards started to sell for real

Like your picture albums...I see you're after the 2mb upgrade for the Mach64...I must tease you to say I got it on such a card very cheap on german Ebay recently :mrgreen:

Amigaz
August 17th, 2008, 12:40 AM
I believe I mentioned it around the same time I offered up a pair of beautiful full-sized AT desktop cases that ended up being scrapped anyway, so, I don't bother anymore.

Just as well, the shipping to Sweden would have been horrendous, especially with the switchable PSU re-installed. It was pretty heavy gauge metal.


Must have missed those posts, was it during mid summer?

yeah, I bet the shipping cost would have been a killer...but sometimes it's worth it....here in Sweden it's almost impossible to find anything related to pre socket 7 PC systems..it's all gone to recycling

Anonymous Coward
August 17th, 2008, 01:22 AM
Yeah, I'm using a VRM socket adapter. You can see the voltage regulator sticking out beside the heatsink if you zoom in. My board doesn't have a built-in 3.3V VRM either. It just supports the classic 486 CPUs. Very few EISA boards support 3.3V CPUs directly. The only one I know of for certain is a certain revision of an AIR model. Just use an adapter. I find they work pretty well.

I actually found the Mach64GX memory module on U.S. ebay several months ago, I just haven't bothered to take a picture of it. I have it in my 386 system on an ISA version of the card. German eBay has pretty good stuff sometimes, but with the euro so high I wouldn't bother unless it was something really amazing...like the Winner 2000 dual bus I picked up several years ago.

Amigaz
August 17th, 2008, 02:30 AM
Yeah, I'm using a VRM socket adapter. You can see the voltage regulator sticking out beside the heatsink if you zoom in. My board doesn't have a built-in 3.3V VRM either. It just supports the classic 486 CPUs. Very few EISA boards support 3.3V CPUs directly. The only one I know of for certain is a certain revision of an AIR model. Just use an adapter. I find they work pretty well.

I actually found the Mach64GX memory module on U.S. ebay several months ago, I just haven't bothered to take a picture of it. I have it in my 386 system on an ISA version of the card. German eBay has pretty good stuff sometimes, but with the euro so high I wouldn't bother unless it was something really amazing...like the Winner 2000 dual bus I picked up several years ago.


Ahhh...now I see the little heatsink on the VRM too :D


mmm...the euro never seem to drop dramatically like the US Dollar
I buy alot of stuff from German ebay since it's quite close to Sweden and the shipping costs aren't dramatically high plus I have some german blood in my vains :mrgreen:

Amigaz
September 29th, 2008, 09:39 AM
The VRM should be no problem. I'm using one in my EISA configuration with an am5x86 at the moment and it works very well. I tried 5x86 at 3x50MHz too. It works fine, but the L2 cache needs more wait states and ends up being slower than 4x40 in the end.

I actually don't have photos of my full setup, but I do have one or two pictures.

The motherboard:
http://picasaweb.google.com/misterzeropage/MyVintageComputerStuff/photo#5078749493938014530

This is an ELSA Winner 2000 I replaced with a SuperMac Spectrum/24
http://picasaweb.google.com/misterzeropage/MyVintageComputerStuff/photo#5108132668792222658

This is a full tower case I want to use (needs a little fixing up)

http://picasaweb.google.com/misterzeropage/MyVintageComputerStuff/photo#5204484585200514354

Your Elsa 2000 card is huge but not as huge as my VLB version of the same card...must be the biggest VLB card ever made :o

http://picasaweb.google.com/jivemaster2005/VLBCards#5251498036203419458

Unknown_K
September 29th, 2008, 10:08 AM
This is my longest VLB card:

http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/view?q=matrox%20vlb&psc=G&filter=1#5067910059166487266

They don't get any bigger and still fit in the case (it is snug along the card guide rail in the back).

Amigaz
September 29th, 2008, 10:31 AM
This is my longest VLB card:

http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/view?q=matrox%20vlb&psc=G&filter=1#5067910059166487266

They don't get any bigger and still fit in the case (it is snug along the card guide rail in the back).

Ahh...full lenght too :cool:

Must be the same lenght as my Elsa then since it's a snug fit too in the guide rail

What model is yours?

Unknown_K
September 29th, 2008, 04:48 PM
It should say in the description Matrox Ultima plus 2MB. I tried to upgrade it to 4MB but the extra memory was not detected.

Anonymous Coward
September 29th, 2008, 04:57 PM
Were you careful to make certain the addtitional RAM chips were FPM and not EDO? Unless you look up their datasheets it isn't easy to tell.

The reason the EISA version of the Winner 2000 isn't quite full length is to leave room for the second VGA connector which allows you to flip the card around and use the ISA card edge (a pretty handy feature).

I have a SuperMac Spectrum/24 (I believe UnknownK has one too) that is a full length and full height card. It may even be a little taller than your VLB card but probably not much. One thing is certain though, it has a hell of a lot more ICs on it.

Amigaz
September 29th, 2008, 10:16 PM
It should say in the description Matrox Ultima plus 2MB. I tried to upgrade it to 4MB but the extra memory was not detected.

Noticed that but after I checked out your other cool cards in your gallery

No Amiga related items in your gallery? :eek: ;)

Amigaz
September 29th, 2008, 10:18 PM
Were you careful to make certain the addtitional RAM chips were FPM and not EDO? Unless you look up their datasheets it isn't easy to tell.

The reason the EISA version of the Winner 2000 isn't quite full length is to leave room for the second VGA connector which allows you to flip the card around and use the ISA card edge (a pretty handy feature).

I have a SuperMac Spectrum/24 (I believe UnknownK has one too) that is a full length and full height card. It may even be a little taller than your VLB card but probably not much. One thing is certain though, it has a hell of a lot more ICs on it.

That supermac card...it doesn't happen to be the big, beefy card on this pic?

http://i7.ebayimg.com/03/i/001/0a/08/b7bc_1.JPG

Won this pile recently on Ebay but haven't recieved them yet

http://i7.ebayimg.com/03/i/001/0a/08/b7bc_1.JPG

Unknown_K
September 29th, 2008, 10:28 PM
That supermac card...it doesn't happen to be the big, beefy card on this pic?

http://i7.ebayimg.com/03/i/001/0a/08/b7bc_1.JPG

Won this pile recently on Ebay but haven't recieved them yet

http://i7.ebayimg.com/03/i/001/0a/08/b7bc_1.JPG

The Spectrum card I have is EISA, have yet to use it since I need a cable to connect it to my ATI EISA card.

Not sure what you won, but that diamond S3 card with RAM upgrade looks interesting.

Unknown_K
September 29th, 2008, 10:31 PM
Noticed that but after I checked out your other cool cards in your gallery

No Amiga related items in your gallery? :eek: ;)


I don't realy have that many Amiga cards (expensive).

I have a 2091 SCSI card, Retina Z2 4MB video, Adrienne Network card, XT bridgeboard, GVP 030/40 CPU card for my A2000, Blizzard IV 030/50 with SCSI addon for the A1200.

When I get around to taking some pics I will have a nice MCA card selection (must have 50-75 cards by now but a bunch are duplicates). Mostly I have a ton of Nubus and that section needs updated as well.

Amigaz
September 29th, 2008, 10:38 PM
I don't realy have that many Amiga cards (expensive).

I have a 2091 SCSI card, Retina Z2 4MB video, Adrienne Network card, XT bridgeboard, GVP 030/40 CPU card for my A2000, Blizzard IV 030/50 with SCSI addon for the A1200.

When I get around to taking some pics I will have a nice MCA card selection (must have 50-75 cards by now but a bunch are duplicates). Mostly I have a ton of Nubus and that section needs updated as well.

Nice selection of Amiga cards you got there..

If we get back to the "Eisa board" topic I saw you had your Eisa mobo in your gallery.
Have you identified what model it is?

Unknown_K
September 29th, 2008, 10:59 PM
Nice selection of Amiga cards you got there..

If we get back to the "Eisa board" topic I saw you had your Eisa mobo in your gallery.
Have you identified what model it is?


No clue, its an SIS board and the CFG file doesn't show many options in the EISA config section:

;!SIS0001.CFG for EISA-486
;DATE:09/30/1990
;
;EISA-486 Demo Board
;
BOARD
ID="SIS0001"
NAME="EISA-486 Demo Board"
MFR="SIS"
CATEGORY="SYS"
SLOT=EMB(0)
READID=YES
COMMENTS="This is the Board Identification Block comment field for the
EISA-486 Demo Board"
HELP="This is the main board configuration help field for EISA-486
Demo Board."

My newest P90 Server has an Intel all EISA board (the SIS has all EISA slots as well).
;
; X-Series Premium System Board
;
BOARD
ID="INT30F1"
NAME="X-Series Premium System Board"
MFR=""
CATEGORY="SYS"
SLOT=EMB(0)
READID=YES
COMMENTS="This is the X-Series Premium System Board with 9 EISA
expansion slots. This system board contains the following
on-board features:\n
\t1) Static RAM Cache,\n
\t2) Shadow RAM Control,\n
\t3) Paged Memory,\n
\t4) 1 Parallel Port,\n
\t5) 2 Serial Ports,\n
\t6) Onboard Video Controller,\n
\t7) Onboard Floppy Controller,\n
\t8) Onboard IDE Hard Disk Controller,\n
\t9) Embedded EISA Busmaster SCSI Adapter,\n
\t10) Onboard mouse/keyboard interface."

Amigaz
September 29th, 2008, 11:18 PM
No clue, its an SIS board and the CFG file doesn't show many options in the EISA config section:

;!SIS0001.CFG for EISA-486
;DATE:09/30/1990
;
;EISA-486 Demo Board
;
BOARD
ID="SIS0001"
NAME="EISA-486 Demo Board"
MFR="SIS"
CATEGORY="SYS"
SLOT=EMB(0)
READID=YES
COMMENTS="This is the Board Identification Block comment field for the
EISA-486 Demo Board"
HELP="This is the main board configuration help field for EISA-486
Demo Board."

My newest P90 Server has an Intel all EISA board (the SIS has all EISA slots as well).
;
; X-Series Premium System Board
;
BOARD
ID="INT30F1"
NAME="X-Series Premium System Board"
MFR=""
CATEGORY="SYS"
SLOT=EMB(0)
READID=YES
COMMENTS="This is the X-Series Premium System Board with 9 EISA
expansion slots. This system board contains the following
on-board features:\n
\t1) Static RAM Cache,\n
\t2) Shadow RAM Control,\n
\t3) Paged Memory,\n
\t4) 1 Parallel Port,\n
\t5) 2 Serial Ports,\n
\t6) Onboard Video Controller,\n
\t7) Onboard Floppy Controller,\n
\t8) Onboard IDE Hard Disk Controller,\n
\t9) Embedded EISA Busmaster SCSI Adapter,\n
\t10) Onboard mouse/keyboard interface."

That didn't say much, lol

What CPU are you using on the board?

Think the config said the same on my Eisa board
All of these baby AT Eisa boards looks quite the same....
Got this recently:

http://i16.ebayimg.com/03/i/001/0b/d0/91c3_1.JPG


And this full At everex board but this PCB looks different different from the rest (well..since it's fullAT):

http://i13.ebayimg.com/03/i/05/ag/94/87_1.JPG

Unknown_K
September 30th, 2008, 12:07 AM
Nice you have VLB extensions on both boards, mine doesn't have that. I have plenty of 486 VLB boards, and a couple PCI ones I have not used in years (PCI is just not sexy in a 486).

The 486 is a DX50 I think, 8x 30 pin SIMM slots for 32MB (no real need to waste 16MB SIMMs on a 486 even if they worked).

The CFG files I posted were just the top section where the board is named. Do you have the correct CFG file for your SIS board?

Amigaz
September 30th, 2008, 12:33 AM
Nice you have VLB extensions on both boards, mine doesn't have that. I have plenty of 486 VLB boards, and a couple PCI ones I have not used in years (PCI is just not sexy in a 486).

The 486 is a DX50 I think, 8x 30 pin SIMM slots for 32MB (no real need to waste 16MB SIMMs on a 486 even if they worked).

The CFG files I posted were just the top section where the board is named. Do you have the correct CFG file for your SIS board?

VLB is nice since good EISA gfx cards are so damn hard to find

mmm....my opinion is also that PCI cards in a 486 is blasphemy imho
PCI performance sucks anyway on socket 3 motherboards

My board I have pictures of in this thread is reported exactly as yours and I'm using the same config file with cf.exe

Anonymous Coward
September 30th, 2008, 05:45 AM
No, the supermac spectrum has so many ICs on it you can hardly make out the PCB. I'll have to take a picture of it later. The VGA pass through cable actually isn't required to use the spectrum. You could use a switchbox or just simply swap the VGA cable over. If you decide to use the VGA pass-though, don't forget to use a VGA terminator. The schematics are on the internet, it's just a couple of resistors.

It looks like the stars of this auction are the twin Mach64 boards. Don't you already have enough of those 2mb expansion modules? There might be an et4000w32p lying underneath there but they all look like cirrus logic cards to me. Good find though.

Amigaz
September 30th, 2008, 06:40 AM
No, the supermac spectrum has so many ICs on it you can hardly make out the PCB. I'll have to take a picture of it later. The VGA pass through cable actually isn't required to use the spectrum. You could use a switchbox or just simply swap the VGA cable over. If you decide to use the VGA pass-though, don't forget to use a VGA terminator. The schematics are on the internet, it's just a couple of resistors.

It looks like the stars of this auction are the twin Mach64 boards. Don't you already have enough of those 2mb expansion modules? There might be an et4000w32p lying underneath there but they all look like cirrus logic cards to me. Good find though.

Pass thru cable? what does this card actually do? I'm curious as hell :)

Can only see one ATI Mach64 card...have I missed something.. ;)

hehe, think I'll have to ebay a 2mb ram upgrade module as "mega rare 2mb upgrade for Mach64 VLB gfx card" :mrgreen:

What made me snipe this auction was the mysterious, huge VLB card.

Unknown_K
September 30th, 2008, 06:53 AM
How much did you pay for that lot? I havn't seen a VLB lot in ages, last one I seen went for nothing so I snagged it (mostly Diamond Viper VLB cards and some ATI mach32's).

Havn't seen an EISA lot on ebay in a while either, I made out like a bandit on the 486 EISA MB and the cards that came with it. Last cheap EISA board I snagged was a 10/100 ethernet card.

Seems like EISA and VLB cards do not come up much on ebay these days unless the seller is trying to sell one as "rare" and for crazy money. I liked ebay better when most of the sellers were people looking to get rid of junk for a couple bucks, now it is all full time mega sellers with gear that is too new or "collectable" and priced that way.

Part of me wants to just have a cutoff date for collecting (maybe pre PCI) while the other part wants to snag cool items when they get into the free/cheap category but that would take up too much space.

Unknown_K
September 30th, 2008, 06:56 AM
Pass thru cable? what does this card actually do? I'm curious as hell :)

Can only see one ATI Mach64 card...have I missed something.. ;)

hehe, think I'll have to ebay a 2mb ram upgrade module as "mega rare 2mb upgrade for Mach64 VLB gfx card" :mrgreen:

What made me snipe this auction was the mysterious, huge VLB card.

Pass thru cables are meant for a second video card that either does an overlay on the main video screen (video input and TV cards) or takes over the monitor in special video modes (like a windows 3.1 only video card). Most video cards have a cable header at the top for those cables, it looks like a fat floppy connector.

The Supermac card I have is for high resolution Windows 3.x and NT use, will not do VGA.

Amigaz
September 30th, 2008, 07:23 AM
Pass thru cables are meant for a second video card that either does an overlay on the main video screen (video input and TV cards) or takes over the monitor in special video modes (like a windows 3.1 only video card). Most video cards have a cable header at the top for those cables, it looks like a fat floppy connector.

The Supermac card I have is for high resolution Windows 3.x and NT use, will not do VGA.


ahh..ok

Very familiar with those cables since I own Voodoo 1 & 2 cards + a couple of Cybervision 64 cards for the Amiga ;)

Amigaz
September 30th, 2008, 07:25 AM
How much did you pay for that lot? I havn't seen a VLB lot in ages, last one I seen went for nothing so I snagged it (mostly Diamond Viper VLB cards and some ATI mach32's).

Havn't seen an EISA lot on ebay in a while either, I made out like a bandit on the 486 EISA MB and the cards that came with it. Last cheap EISA board I snagged was a 10/100 ethernet card.

Seems like EISA and VLB cards do not come up much on ebay these days unless the seller is trying to sell one as "rare" and for crazy money. I liked ebay better when most of the sellers were people looking to get rid of junk for a couple bucks, now it is all full time mega sellers with gear that is too new or "collectable" and priced that way.

Part of me wants to just have a cutoff date for collecting (maybe pre PCI) while the other part wants to snag cool items when they get into the free/cheap category but that would take up too much space.

This is the auction: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&item=250290854259

What...no EISA cards? grabbed this bunch:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&item=330273810594

:mrgreen:

Anonymous Coward
September 30th, 2008, 08:06 AM
Es ist jetzt ganz klar warum kann ich nicht guten EISA Auktionen finden. Diese Auktionen sind nicht im Amerika, aber im Deutschland. Ich bin sehr eifersüchtig!!!

The Germans always bogart all the good stuff.

In the picture of your VLB auction the two Mach64 cards are on the very top. On the left side is 2MB Mach64 DRAM, and the right side a 4MB Mach64 VRAM. The DRAM is a nice card too since it is faster in DOS than the VRAM version.

The Supermac Spectrum/24 is actually TIGA which was a pseudo standard in the late 80s and early 90s. It was a pretty good idea and very fast, but just too damn expensive to go mainstream. There also exists a version of the card called "Thunder/24" which has a VGA core. It's probably better to just use the internal VGA feature connector though since you can use whatever VGA card you like. What makes this setup attractive is that you can have the best performance in both DOS and Windows at the same time. Most SVGA cards can only do one or the other well or both just okay.

In theory some SVGA adapters allow you to set a secondary address or disable the VGA core leaving only the coprocessor accessible. This should allow two SVGA adapters to co-exist. This is the reason why I bought the ELSA winner-2000 dualbus in the first place. However, I was unable to get it working perfectly using the ELSA supplied drivers. I should try it again later using generic S3 928 drivers, because it's a pretty fast card and has a good ramdac. It's more appealing than the Supermacs since those only support 24-bit colour modes.

Unknown_K
September 30th, 2008, 09:05 AM
This is the auction: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&item=250290854259

What...no EISA cards? grabbed this bunch:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&ssPageName=STRK:MEWNX:IT&item=330273810594

:mrgreen:

The 3 video cards in that lot are nice.

Amigaz
September 30th, 2008, 09:23 AM
The 3 video cards in that lot are nice.

Yep, it's what made me snipe that auction

The rest will just be "luggage" in the box coming from "das vaterland"

Germany really rocks when it comes to finding vintage hardware gems

Think I'm going to sell the Elsa Winner 1000 card since I already got one

Unknown_K
September 30th, 2008, 11:12 AM
Germany seems to have quite a bit of cool PC and Amiga stuff. I generally don't bother importing anything from overseas unless its small and very cheap (my EISA caching IDE controller was about $12 shipped from the UK). I don't even check ebay outside of the US.

Maybe in 20 years the dollar will be worth something again.

Anonymous Coward
September 30th, 2008, 01:58 PM
Shit.

My Spectrum/24 doesn't appear to be working anymore. I'll have to do more testing. Hopefully it's not dead (though it seems to be).

UPDATE:

It's not dead. It just has to be in an EISA busmaster slot even though according to EISA config it is not a busmaster device. So make sure you know which slots on your board do busmastering. Two of mine do not, though only one is marked that way.

Anonymous Coward
October 1st, 2008, 07:24 AM
One important thing I need to bring to attention about using the am5x86 on EISA motherboards is that if your voltage regulator does not have a jumper for controller writeback/writethrough caching schemes you will need to ground pin B13 on the chip (force WT mode) or you will run into DMA troubles.

Amigaz
October 1st, 2008, 07:57 AM
One important thing I need to bring to attention about using the am5x86 on EISA motherboards is that if your voltage regulator does not have a jumper for controller writeback/writethrough caching schemes you will need to ground pin B13 on the chip (force WT mode) or you will run into DMA troubles.


Thanks for the info :)

Will probably use a Pentium Overdrive on the full size AT board, the other board will be kept as a spare

Anonymous Coward
October 2nd, 2008, 11:05 AM
Here's a shot of the massive Spectrum/24

http://lh6.ggpht.com/misterzeropage/SOUa61EFxTI/AAAAAAAAA88/9RSPxivHN5I/s800/Spectrum24.jpg

There's actually on article on the the net from 1993 Byte Magazine and this card did quite will in their tests.

Sharkonwheels
October 7th, 2008, 08:13 AM
Keeping with the EISA theme, here (http://cgi.ebay.com/Two-NE3300-32-Bit-EISA-NIC-Novell-Opened-Never-Used_W0QQitemZ320308503799QQcmdZViewItem?hash=item 320308503799&_trkparms=72%3A1163%7C39%3A1%7C66%3A2%7C65%3A12%7C 240%3A1318&_trksid=p3286.c0.m14) is a link to two Novel EISA network cards on fleaBay.

http://i24.ebayimg.com/05/i/000/e4/82/c625_1.JPG


T

Amigaz
October 12th, 2008, 12:22 PM
Seem to be another Elsa Winner 2000 version, just dug out a card I had...the "Pro version" don't know what's so "pro" about it yet, hehe

http://lh3.ggpht.com/jivemaster2005/SPJVgRAP63I/AAAAAAAAALI/oDjL5iVEgWs/P1010390.JPG