PDA

View Full Version : Seagate ST-225 used for 20 years+



QuantumII
September 1st, 2008, 05:19 AM
Hi

Today when I was throwing away an old CRT monitor at work, I found a Seagate ST-225 disk in the dumpster with a label "Taken out of service 04/01/2004"

I wonder who used the disk for such a long time.. Will take it home today and connect it to an MFM controller to see if it still works.. It still spins up allright.

I also found a ST-157A IDE Stepper HDD. This one also spins up, but no sound from the stepper motor.. Will try that one today as well

Still, a cool find and I'm happy to have the hdd's in my collection even if they don't work :)

aaaall
September 1st, 2008, 11:46 AM
What hard drive they use on the medical equipments MRI machine? Can you believe that they still are using the Maxtor 7345SR SCSI, 330MB and that hard drive is worth $500 plus? Some Arco gas stations are still using the Seagate ST4038, Some old evelators still use the Quantum LPS or ELS42S (42MB SCSI), LPS170S. CNC machines still use Kalok KL320 (20MB MFM hard drive). YES, ST225, ST251, ST125, ST138 are still running outthere. Seagate ST1100 (100MB) are hard to find and are worth a thousand dollars. Of course, if you are not in the hard drive business, it is hard to believe. And if you don't know where to sell, they are worth nothing. ST225 is easy to fix, if it is spin but NO READY sound, you might have bad controller board (missing components or corrosion)

QuantumII
September 1st, 2008, 01:12 PM
What hard drive they use on the medical equipments MRI machine? Can you believe that they still are using the Maxtor 7345SR SCSI, 330MB and that hard drive is worth $500 plus? Some Arco gas stations are still using the Seagate ST4038, Some old evelators still use the Quantum LPS or ELS42S (42MB SCSI), LPS170S. CNC machines still use Kalok KL320 (20MB MFM hard drive). YES, ST225, ST251, ST125, ST138 are still running outthere. Seagate ST1100 (100MB) are hard to find and are worth a thousand dollars. Of course, if you are not in the hard drive business, it is hard to believe. And if you don't know where to sell, they are worth nothing. ST225 is easy to fix, if it is spin but NO READY sound, you might have bad controller board (missing components or corrosion)


The ST-225 works fine (it has a bad sector or two) but else it's just fine.

The IDE one is not working, The heads had apparently previously stuck to the platter and damaged them beyond repair, but still a cool item to have in the collection :)

I removed the top cover to inspect a mysterious sound, and there was two groves in the platter smacking into the heads when it was spinning.. A downer really, but on the other hand why throw away a working IDE stepper HDD ? :confused:

mbbrutman
September 1st, 2008, 01:44 PM
What kind of sicko uses a hard drive for 20 years!

Oh, wait a minute ...

BG101
November 20th, 2008, 07:13 PM
I feel a bit gutted having thrown out a "dead" ST225 a few years back, the one I have now was saved because it still worked (barely and with loads of bad sectors). A full Scandisk took several hours when I last had my PC1640 running around 6 years ago.

The remaining drive was all but dead (would just about read the directory) when I tried it again recently, but having dug the machine out of the store yesterday and low-level formatted it, the ST225 is as good as new. Not one bad sector!! Really wish I saved the other one, but you live and learn don't you :)


These machines were bagged by myself from my old workplace, where they had been running from the EFACS database for many years. I decided to keep 1 machine and some of the bits from the other when its HD failed.



BG

Chuck(G)
November 20th, 2008, 08:53 PM
There are still ST506s in use. One of my boxes uses a 14" Shugart SA4008 drive. Another uses a 7MB 5.25" Rodime. I still have 330 MB Miniscribe ESDI and 120MB Priam MFM drives in use. My XT uses a Quantum Q540 35MB. All have been working very well. A lot of the old drives were pretty noisy. Those Priam/Atasi MFM drives would wake the dead when they recalibrate.

Some of the early 3.5" IDE drives didn't fare as well. I've got a bunch of 200-300MB Conners that progressively developed media errors until they were unusable.

In short, the old drives still hold up pretty darn well. It's the newer ones that aren't so hot.

Lou - N2MIY
November 21st, 2008, 02:55 AM
I fired up the pdp-11/73 last night to install an ST-251 in addition to the ST-225 that's already in there. Unlike the PC world that kept up with progress, the pdp-11 and microvax are trapped in time. With the exception of having a really expensive ($125+) SCSI controller, the only viable option for economy minded late-model enthusiasts are MFM drives. Fortunately, the ST225 is rock solid, there are plenty around, and when operated only a few hours a week should last for a long time to come.

Lou

Crawford
November 21st, 2008, 03:25 AM
Funny. A ST-255 was one of my 'finds' on my last junket ;)

It could have anything on it from before, and it's destined to go into a PDP-11 I want to build.

I'm thinking that I'll need to format it, and I'd like to try to get the data off first. Other than the obvious hardware connection (finding a MFM controller), can I just fire up Linux and dd the info off of it? After all, it's just 20 megs...

-C

BG101
November 21st, 2008, 03:23 PM
If it's still readable, I don't see why not. Then do a low-level format using Disk Manager (if you want a copy let me know) - I wish ST225s were as readily available here as they are in the US! Postage costs a fortune!



BG

Stone
July 15th, 2010, 05:29 AM
I've got one of these so if you have a buyer we can work out a percentage deal.


What hard drive they use on the medical equipments MRI machine? Can you believe that they still are using the Maxtor 7345SR SCSI, 330MB and that hard drive is worth $500 plus?

wmmullaney
July 15th, 2010, 05:32 AM
I've got one of these so if you have a buyer we can work out a percentage deal.

This member hasn't been around since september '08, 2 years ago ;)

Captain Midnight
July 25th, 2010, 07:21 AM
One also has to consider that hard drives built in the era of the ST-225 were hundreds, if not thousands, of dollars for a decent unit, plus controller. Today, computers are getting to the point that they're so cheap, they're nearing throw-away status. Back then, buying a hard drive for a computer was a major investment.

All that said, it wouldn't surprise me a bit if your ST-225 wasn't still working w/ no errors. Same goes for the ST-251. Those have to be my two favorite hard drives of all time. I mean yeah, it's great I've got a 1 TB drive in my PC now, but those drives had character. When's the last time you knew which drive you had in your PC by the noise it made spinning up and/or seeking? Classic.

I'd make it feel at home in, say, a nice turbo XT machine or early 286. Just make sure you park the drive after each use to avoid possible head crashes and that thing will basically go until heaven knows when.

Agent Orange
July 25th, 2010, 08:50 AM
I was working for a government organization in 1987 near Glen Echo, MD, when I purchased my first hard drive. I was part of an electronics maintenance team and we had access to the so-called "beltway bandits" supply channels. About that time, the government was real high on purchasing from minority and women operated businesses. I had a fairly new Tandy 1000SX and just couldn't bring myself to shell out $750 to Radio Shack for the hard drive upgrade kit. A lady supplier indicated that if I showed up at her back door, late in the afternoon, I could get a ST-225 for around $300.00, but had to keep it all under my hat. I later scored a Western Digital WD1002A-WX1 controller, and remember having to solder a jumper on W7, pins 2 & 3, for the compatible interrupt. I removed the lower "B" floppy and the ST-225 side into place like it was made for it. Following the outlined boot procedure in the "Winchester" phamplet, the Tandy booted without incident and low and behold, there was that coveted "C:\" prompt. I still have the ST-225 and controller. They were in constant use until a short while ago went the the Vintage XT-IDE projct made it possible to retire that old lash-up. BTW, if any one would like a scanned copy of the original setup phamplet, drop me a PM and I'll try to accomodate you.

james1095
August 2nd, 2010, 11:40 AM
There's a lot of ancient hard drives still kicking. My friend's XT has a Seagate ST-213 10MB MFM drive which still works perfectly. We just stuck an XT IDE board in there though to replace it in regular use and preserve the original.

I'm kicking myself for giving away and throwing away loads of this stuff a decade or so ago :( It was less than worthless at the time, I kinda suspect the same will happen with all the CRT PC monitors people are throwing out now.

wmmullaney
August 2nd, 2010, 11:54 AM
My Samsung AT clone has a Seagate st225 in it as well, working fine without a hitch for the last 22 years :D

Dwight Elvey
August 3rd, 2010, 07:28 AM
Hi
The ST-225 was the first drive to have problems with stiction. The
early ones often needed a slap on the side to spin up. The later
ones had no problems.
I still use a ST-506 on my home brew computer ( NC4000 chip
running a old xt floppy controller and an old HD controller ).
I have a ST-251 connected to my M20 olivetti ( Z8000 processor ).
Dwight

TomFCS
August 3rd, 2010, 01:31 PM
Here ya go. First hard drive I ever owned. Still have it. Still works. Original receipt.

Tom