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zane
November 22nd, 2008, 08:31 AM
I found some 1986 grey boxed Linux stuff.
Linux 1 2 3 and 2 others that seem to accompany it.
The 1 2 3 is marked for goverment.
Is this anything of interest or value?
Thx for any info, my google search was not successful.

ahm
November 22nd, 2008, 09:16 AM
I found some 1986 grey boxed Linux stuff.
Not likely. The original Linux kernel was only released in 1991,
and it was many years before commercial Linux products became available.

Post photos and we might be able to tell you what you have.

Andy

mbbrutman
November 22nd, 2008, 10:47 AM
Uh, Lotus 1-2-3 ?

Mike

zane
November 22nd, 2008, 11:38 AM
Hi. The main box was marked Linux 1-2-3. It has 6 5-1/2 floppies and a small keyboard overlay(said it came with 3). Everything was dated 1986, copyrite I believe. It is in a hard grey cardboard sleeve, there were 3 of sleeves total, the others were manuals and such. I do not have any pictures, but thx for trying to help.

Ole Juul
November 22nd, 2008, 03:35 PM
hehe ... Either you're pulling my leg or someone is pulling yours. (checks date) ... nope ... OK, someone is pulling yours. :) Should that be "Lotux" perhaps? lol

I think that it was Slackware that started the distro thing - comming out with disk sets with numbers. The numbers were (are) different and they were 3 1/4".

Ole Juul
November 22nd, 2008, 03:43 PM
OK, OK, before anyone jumps .... that should be 3 1/2". :) (sorry)

zane
November 27th, 2008, 05:00 AM
No intentional leg pulling, brain runs faster than my eyes sometimes.

It was Lotus Lotus Lotus

So now I am in the wrong forum I bet.

Anyone care to elaborate now that my story is strait??

Happy T-Day everyone

billdeg
December 5th, 2008, 11:00 AM
Here is a photo from my software inventory of the first three versions of Lotus for the IBM PC

http://www.vintagecomputer.net/ibm/software/ibm_software-Lotus.jpg

2.01 is the one on the right, and it's from 1986

jh1523
January 18th, 2009, 07:30 PM
I think that it was Slackware that started the distro thing ...

Actually it was Yggdrasil. First Yggdrasil distro was 1992, first Slackware was 1993.

<proud Slackware user to this day> :D

(edit) Actually I am wrong. I just checked my dates, SLS came out in Sep 92, Yggdrasil in Dec 92. In early 1993, SLS split into Debian and Slackware. And the rest is history...

Chuck(G)
January 18th, 2009, 07:39 PM
Must've been the Linux used in Area 51 in 1986. First experiments in time travel. Doesn't compare with my 1936 copy of Microsoft Word for Windows...

patscc
January 18th, 2009, 09:01 PM
Chuck(G) said...1936 copy of Microsoft Word for Windows...
Ah, now I understand the bloat. They've over 70 years to work on it then...
patscc

Ole Juul
January 18th, 2009, 10:23 PM
Actually it was Yggdrasil. First Yggdrasil distro was 1992, first Slackware was 1993.

<proud Slackware user to this day> :D

(edit) Actually I am wrong. I just checked my dates, SLS came out in Sep 92, Yggdrasil in Dec 92. In early 1993, SLS split into Debian and Slackware. And the rest is history...
I downloaded a series of floppies from some BBS a very long time ago. It worked but I didn't know enough to do much with it. DOS was still pretty viable for a long time after that.

I might try slackware again sometime but I don't like to spend a lot of time fiddeling with getting all the modern codecs to work. At the moment I'm using Kubntu and, unfortunately, all the things which are wrong with it are the things which are right about Slackware. I can't win. The only way to have it all is to understand the whole setup and that's why I use DOS. Atleast there aren't any files that I didn't put where they are, or know what do - I wish I could do that with Linux. (sigh)

jh1523
January 20th, 2009, 05:06 PM
I might try slackware again sometime but I don't like to spend a lot of time fiddeling with getting all the modern codecs to work. (...) The only way to have it all is to understand the whole setup and that's why I use DOS.

So all modern codecs work with DOS? :p

I use Slackware because:
1. I've been using it for 12 years now, and I know how to make it do everything I want.
2. makes setting up exactly the configuration you want a breeze, without any added fluff (great for servers)
3. I just want to be cool, man :)

(I have a machine running Slackware 5 beta since 1999 - I DARE you to even find this particular release anywhere :twisted:)

edit - I took upon myself my own challenge - the only trace I could find that Slackware 5 even existed is this: ftp://ftp.heanet.ie/mirrors/ftp.slackware.com/pub/slackware/slackware-7.0/ChangeLog.txt - look at the entry from Fri Aug 20 17:22:50 CDT 1999. Well, that and the CD I have in front of me.

Ole Juul
January 20th, 2009, 05:27 PM
I know you're just razzin me :) but, of course, no codecs etc work with DOS. My reasoning is that I use DOS to have control. Control that I can't get with Linux bucause it has too much complexity. I don't want to spend a couple of hours trying to understand something, only to have to do that again with the next thing I need. What I meant is that at the moment I find Kubuntu convenient because of it's particular functionality for me. I didn't find slackware able to do what I wanted last time I tried it. Probably it too has moved forward, but I won't find out until I try it again. :)

Of course, I end up learning more and more about Linux every time I delve deeper into it - and I too have been doing that since the beginning. I'm just a slow learner. Linux is great for having all the new stuff work, and that's why I use it for all that stuff. Still, I can't put a Linux system together one file at a time from the bottom up - and that really bugs me. :)

Ole Juul
January 20th, 2009, 05:30 PM
... (I have a machine running Slackware 5 beta since 1999 - I DARE you to even find this particular release anywhere :twisted:) ...


Now that IS cool!

jh1523
January 20th, 2009, 05:31 PM
Still, I can't put a Linux system together one file at a time from the bottom up - and that really bugs me. :)

Look at this, it'll help if you really want to, and have the time to do it:

http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/

gerrydoire
January 20th, 2009, 05:47 PM
I use Slackware because:
1. I've been using it for 12 years now, and I know how to make it do everything I want.
2. makes setting up exactly the configuration you want a breeze, without any added fluff (great for servers)
3. I just want to be cool, man :)




I wish I had the patience for that stuff, after 15 years of clicking Windows Icons I'm too lazy now ..................... :confused:

Ole Juul
January 20th, 2009, 09:29 PM
Look at this, it'll help if you really want to, and have the time to do it:
http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/

I've got it. And the book too! After a couple of hours looking at it, I still can't do it. That's a LOT of work! (sigh) Ya, you gotta really want to. Thanks for the suggestion though -it's a good one and I don't hesitate to reccomend it to others. :p

We're obviously on the same track - except for the time comitment. :)

jh1523
January 21st, 2009, 03:34 AM
Yeah. Being a graduate student for 7 years helped with the time thingie. Now that I'm past that and working, I wouldn't do it either.

DoctorPepper
January 21st, 2009, 06:22 PM
I guess this topic has turned into a Linux free-for-all, so here's my $0.02:

I've been using Linux since 1999 (this will be my 10th year -- Yay!), and I've used most of the "main-stream" Linux distros since then. I still use Slackware on one machine (mostly out of nostalgia), but for the most part, have converted everything over to Ubuntu. Why? because I'm just tired of having to configure the system the way I want. At work, I have to baby-sit hundreds of Sun Solaris servers all day long (and at night and on weekends, holidays, etc...), and want my home systems to "just work", but do not like Windows and find Mac OS to be to GUI-fied for my tastes. The wife uses a Mac, but that's just her personal preference. And I know just enough about Macs to be able to keep hers working :-D

I also dabble in FreeBSD and OpenBSD, because they are very good Unix-like operating systems in their own right.

When I recommend Linux to friends or acquaintances, I go with Ubuntu. Yes, you still have to install the codecs to make a lot of multi-media work (no, I don't use the 3rd party pre-packaged scripts), but it only takes a little effort on my part, to get a tremendously usable desktop.

jh1523
January 23rd, 2009, 06:24 AM
I admit, apart from Slackware I also run Ubuntu - on my laptop. It was just so damn easy to get it on there. ;)

Potkoorok
March 12th, 2009, 12:41 AM
Actually it was Yggdrasil. First Yggdrasil distro was 1992, first Slackware was 1993.

<proud Slackware user to this day> :D

(edit) Actually I am wrong. I just checked my dates, SLS came out in Sep 92, Yggdrasil in Dec 92. In early 1993, SLS split into Debian and Slackware. And the rest is history...

And if you're really interested, I put my copy of SLS up for adoption by kind Virtual Machine users in the Bochs section of Sourceforge:
http://sourceforge.net/project/shownotes.php?release_id=146898&group_id=12580

(I was a Johnny-come-lately in Linux terms - 1993? You call that early?!? -, or at least, that's how I see it. But on the other hand, I've put my copy up for others' enjoyment, so at least in that respect I'm not so much a Johnny-come-lately after all. :)

mbbrutman
March 12th, 2009, 06:35 AM
Let's try to keep off topic one liners to a minimum ...