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gerrydoire
December 6th, 2008, 08:53 AM
Technology you are aware of, heard of, but had nothing to do with.

For Me:

The following:

Any IBM PS/2 computer or MCA type computer, have never owned or even
touched a MCA card.

Any Computers that had ESDI in them, never seen, used or touched a ESDI whatever.

Anything to do with EISA

Never owned: Commodore 64 or used one.

That being said, I would like to own a C-64 and PS/2 IBM in new condition.
To add to the collection!
:-D

NeXT
December 6th, 2008, 11:17 AM
I have never worked with something that used either core memory or reels of tapes OR had a front panel with colorful switches (hint hint ;) )
Someday however I would like to own a PDP-8 with a DecTape drive.

Honestly though, I have never touched true CP/M hardware let alone ever got my hands on a copy of CP/M.

Vint
December 6th, 2008, 11:48 AM
The Apple Macintosh came out in 1984. I've never used or owned a Mac, don't know a thing about them. Other than my Apple IIe and IIc, which run BASIC, I am totally unfamiliar with Apple Computers. Some people swear by them. Maybe that's swear at them, I'm not sure :)

gerrydoire
December 6th, 2008, 11:55 AM
The Apple Macintosh came out in 1984. I've never used or owned a Mac, don't know a thing about them. Other than my Apple IIe and IIc, which run BASIC, I am totally unfamiliar with Apple Computers. Some people swear by them. Maybe that's swear at them, I'm not sure :)

With Vista floating around, a MAC sure looks attractive don't it...

zane
December 6th, 2008, 04:02 PM
I have never used the old box, or anything faster than 900mhz. or a mac tho I have 2. bout sums it up:D

Vint
December 6th, 2008, 04:13 PM
Technology you are aware of, heard of, but had nothing to do with.
...Never owned: Commodore 64 or used one...That being said, I would like to own a C-64 and PS/2 IBM in new condition.
To add to the collection! :-D

To respond to your other post, yes, a Mac does appeal to me lately, (Vista sure doesn't - I'll hang in there with Win XP as long as possible), and perhaps I'll nab an oldie Mac just to fiddle with the OS of it I know nothing of.

As for your never owning a C64, oh - those were the days. I spent 10 years with one! Ended up with over 300 of those old 5.25" disks full of stuff. Memories of Quantum-Link, Loadstar, GEOS, and local BBS boards keep flooding back.

If you're thinking about getting a Commodore, may I suggest the Commodore 128. It's like 3 machines in one! You can use CPM and 80 column mode, or as a 128k RAM 40 column system in BASIC or even revert to a common C64 mode with a 'go64' command. I really like my C128 :)

NathanAllan
December 6th, 2008, 05:21 PM
I second the C128, with all that available I finally got mine.

What I haven't used, 8" floppy drives, anything with reels or drums, minis or micros. Oh, and no kind of mainframe. Or an Atari portfolio, which would have been neat. That's the classic stuff.

With Vista the way it is and win7 coming, too, I am gonna stick with win2kpro until Billy himself comes to my door and persuades me to upgrade. But then I'd probably get another iBook. This one rocks and it's old, too.

Nathan

Yzzerdd
December 6th, 2008, 05:23 PM
If anyones looking for a 128 and GEOS 128, I can help....

Macintosh systems 6 and 7(the only older Mac O/Ses I've used(excluding ProDOS)) are seriously just about the same in how the menus look, placement, interaction, etc, as Mac OSX 10.3.9. Only huge difference in menu placement is that OSX has a quick access bar at the bottom of the screen, unlike 6 or 7. Anyhow, the point is, if you're interested in newer Macs, I suggest you pickup a Classic or Classic II with OS/7.5.5(a very functional version of System 7) and try it out. Just imagine it in color and with a quick access bar.

As for me, I've never used a computer 1979 or below. I'd love to pickup an Apple II/II+ someday, as they seem pretty cool. I've also never used a Commodore computer(although I own 4 or 5), never touched an S-100 system(looking to save $1K or $2K for an Altair, though), and have never owned a vintage Compaq computer, but am looking in to purchasing a Compaq Portable/Plus/II someday. I crave the funtionality of a home computer thats in a box with a handle that weighs 35LBs.

--Jack

gerrydoire
December 6th, 2008, 05:46 PM
To respond to your other post, yes, a Mac does appeal to me lately, (Vista sure doesn't - I'll hang in there with Win XP as long as possible), and perhaps I'll nab an oldie Mac just to fiddle with the OS of it I know nothing of.

As for your never owning a C64, oh - those were the days. I spent 10 years with one! Ended up with over 300 of those old 5.25" disks full of stuff. Memories of Quantum-Link, Loadstar, GEOS, and local BBS boards keep flooding back.

If you're thinking about getting a Commodore, may I suggest the Commodore 128. It's like 3 machines in one! You can use CPM and 80 column mode, or as a 128k RAM 40 column system in BASIC or even revert to a common C64 mode with a 'go64' command. I really like my C128 :)

I had a IBM PC when the C64 was all the rage.

If I was to get a C64 now, I would never actually use it, just want one that is very newish for the hell of it.

:>

Druid6900
December 6th, 2008, 07:44 PM
I've never used, owned or repaired a computer with 2L size vacuum tube diodes in it.

frozenfire75i
December 7th, 2008, 07:50 AM
Nerver Used or Touched any:

MAC or Apple system
1980's And down Pre 5150 Systems S-100 ECT
MCA PS/2
C64 or any commie.

gerrydoire
December 7th, 2008, 08:22 AM
I second the C128, with all that available I finally got mine.

What I haven't used, 8" floppy drives, anything with reels or drums, minis or micros. Oh, and no kind of mainframe. Or an Atari portfolio, which would have been neat. That's the classic stuff.

With Vista the way it is and win7 coming, too, I am gonna stick with win2kpro until Billy himself comes to my door and persuades me to upgrade. But then I'd probably get another iBook. This one rocks and it's old, too.

Nathan

I have XP on my home made computer, 1 gig at 3.04 ghz, runs ok.

I have Vista 64bit on my Toshiba laptop, its a core2duo with 3 gigs.

I installed Photoshop CS2 32bit and Photoshop CS3 64bit, the 64-bit Photoshop was slower on the 64-bit Windows than the 32bit Photoshop.

I didn't do extensive tests.

gerrydoire
December 7th, 2008, 08:24 AM
Nerver Used or Touched any:

MAC or Apple system
1980's And down Pre 5150 Systems S-100 ECT
MCA PS/2
C64 or any commie.

I never touched an Apple II until the last few years, I didn't miss much lol.

In 1985 the best computer ever created The Amiga was available, technically superior to anything available at that time, too bad the company was run by morons and it went bye bye..

Terry Yager
December 7th, 2008, 09:31 AM
Punch cards, except for paying the utility & fone billz that used to be printed on them. (Do not bend, fold, spindle or mutilate).

--T

wmmullaney
December 7th, 2008, 10:44 AM
I'v never used anything s-100, I'd like to but don't have the money at the moment. :)

paul
December 7th, 2008, 12:45 PM
My earliest programming experience was with punch cards on a Burroughs mainframe at UCSD (San Diego) in the early 70's. Other than run the cards through, we weren't allowed to touch or even see the computer. But at least I got to punch the cards myself on a classic IBM console, not the case later on in New Zealand where they had an even older Burroughs with flashing neon lights, and wouldn't let me near anything.

But mostly I *haven't* had experience with just about anything other than PC's, but I did purchase a Mac once just to try Linux PPC on it.

I'm really glad I've been able to collect a few unix workstations however - another genre of highly-revered "expensive" computers I was not allowed to play with in their time. The mystery is gone now and the facade is down.

I just bought my first new TV since 1987, a 46" Sony LCD and a PS3 console to match. Couldn't resist - we have had HD broadcast since mid-year using h.264, and the increment in technology over analog is spectacular, even better than going from monochrome to color.

tezza
December 8th, 2008, 12:43 AM
My first computer experience was with punch cards. I was a college student.

We weren't allowed near the hardware of course :)

Tez

nymetropolitans
December 8th, 2008, 01:46 AM
But mostly I *haven't* had experience with just about anything other than PC's, but I did purchase a Mac once just to try Linux PPC on it.

Linux PPC is a technology I've never used but would like very much to. What's your take on it? Is there a decent amount of software available out there for it?

The list of things I haven't owned or used would take up several pages and probably break this forum's database. I'm almost always late to the party, it took me until 2001 to have a computer faster than 10MHz haha.

paul
December 8th, 2008, 11:46 AM
Re, Linux PPC, this was 10 years ago now and the Mac 8200-120 was even older. It did not run very fast at all. The only thing I was impressed by was seeing a colored linux duck when it started booting, something I don't think is possible on an older PC which boots in text mode.

gerrydoire
December 8th, 2008, 11:54 AM
My first PC computer was a IBM PC XT.

It came with 640k memory, 60 meg RLL HD, Monochrome Hercules Card and Amber Monitor, 360k Drive.

I upgraded through every inche of advances
CGA-EGA-VGA-2400-9600-14.4-286-386 and on and on..

The money blown!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :eek:

barythrin
December 8th, 2008, 03:20 PM
I guess the biggest thing I've never used is a computer with a flip button panel to program it (in binary/ML). I have an IMSAI now but have yet to get what I want to prepare powering it on with less risk.

I also never got to do punchcards, although I have a book on writing code on the (4301?). Interesting read and atleast I know about the trick some programmers did with their stack of punchcards, taking a ruler and drawing line across them in pencil (not perfect, but when you drop your computer program, you could atleast attempt to put the cards back in order vs shoot yourself).

- John

Druid6900
December 8th, 2008, 07:37 PM
Interesting read and atleast I know about the trick some programmers did with their stack of punchcards, taking a ruler and drawing line across them in pencil (not perfect, but when you drop your computer program, you could atleast attempt to put the cards back in order vs shoot yourself).

- John

Yes, a diagonal line across the top of the deck was very handy when you had funny friends that like to shuffle them.

MikeS
December 8th, 2008, 08:53 PM
Yes, a diagonal line across the top of the deck was very handy when you had funny friends that like to shuffle them.
---------
Or would have been when you're carrying a three foot stack (abt. 4000 cards) from the sorter to the collator and sneeze... Been there...

nymetropolitans
December 9th, 2008, 12:46 AM
Re, Linux PPC, this was 10 years ago now and the Mac 8200-120 was even older. It did not run very fast at all. The only thing I was impressed by was seeing a colored linux duck when it started booting, something I don't think is possible on an older PC which boots in text mode.

Colored duck....hmm, maybe I'll pass :)

How about the versions of Windows NT that ran on PowerPC systems? Has anyone ever used one of those?

Ole Juul
December 9th, 2008, 12:57 AM
I've never had a Mac of any kind even though I think the old "bricks" are tempting because they look so cool. I tried one once but I couldn't really figure out how to work it.

nymetropolitans
December 9th, 2008, 03:06 AM
I've never had a Mac of any kind even though I think the old "bricks" are tempting because they look so cool. I tried one once but I couldn't really figure out how to work it.

I've had two and I still can't figure out how to work it....or I should say rather, I can't figure out how it works.

barythrin
December 9th, 2008, 10:52 AM
Linux PPC is a technology I've never used but would like very much to. What's your take on it? Is there a decent amount of software available out there for it?

The list of things I haven't owned or used would take up several pages and probably break this forum's database. I'm almost always late to the party, it took me until 2001 to have a computer faster than 10MHz haha.

I ran yellowdog on a PPC for a while. It was alright, but later I wiped it out and put netbsd on there since I liked the packaging system better. I never did too much advanced stuff with it though, I just had it dual booting between MacOS8 and Yellowdog. I could do nfs from it and used it for a sniffer a little bit but it was more just a test.

lol "yellow duck?" .. penguin perhaps? ;-)

paul
December 9th, 2008, 12:53 PM
Yeah, penguin, that's it. Thought there was something funny about typing "duck."

There was a program on the Burroughs 6200 that would print one large letter per line-printer page for party banners and such. I was only 17 at the time so this was fun for me to run one card through the massive high-speed IBM card reader and get a dozen pages of printout out of the amazingly fast line printer. One time I forgot the terminating asterisk and got nearly 80 blank sheets.

Terry Yager
December 9th, 2008, 02:12 PM
Technology you are aware of, heard of, but had nothing to do with.

I think...an ICBM! I've built, played with, whatever, toy model rockets when I was a kid (and when my kids were kids), but those are just a teaser. I'd love to get my hands on the real thing. Of course, if it came with a warhead, that'd be just extra icing on the cake...

--T

MikeS
December 9th, 2008, 02:17 PM
That's why those black vans are parked at the end of your driveway...

Terry Yager
December 9th, 2008, 02:40 PM
Aaahh, they don't even bother anymore with real techs inna black van fulla kewl 'lectronic surveillance gear. These days, all I rate is some low-level lackey inna black Ford Focus...

--T

Druid6900
December 9th, 2008, 08:06 PM
Aaahh, they don't even bother anymore with real techs inna black van fulla kewl 'lectronic surveillance gear. These days, all I rate is some low-level lackey inna black Ford Focus...

--T

How the mighty have fallen.

My condolences, T, but, after the warhead post, I'm sure things will pick up :)

Terry Yager
December 9th, 2008, 08:51 PM
How the mighty have fallen.

My condolences, T, but, after the warhead post, I'm sure things will pick up :)

Well, I do have a reputation to maintain...

--T

Ksarul
December 12th, 2008, 01:41 PM
8K core memory modules are fun to work on--especially when tied to a computer system older than I was when I worked on it. . .and if it has a 9900 series microprocessor in it, I either have one or want one. . .

I've pretty much avoided contact with Apple or Commodore computers of all types.

willie8605
December 12th, 2008, 03:01 PM
With Vista floating around, a MAC sure looks attractive don't it...

Vista is why I now have all of my computers running on Ubuntu 8.10. Although, I still have a dual boot with Vista on one machine (can't find my XP disks) for those painful times I need to use Windows for something.

Now if I can only get my hands on an Intel based Mac so I can try it with Ubuntu; that would be a attractive machine :)

Ole Juul
December 12th, 2008, 03:16 PM
I recently switched my missus over to Kubuntu 8.04 from XP and she never skipped a beat - except she won't stop talking about the increased speed. Apart from vintage machinery, I'll never buy a brand name again. IMHO the days of any advantages (or no disadvantages!) to brand names are long gone.

barythrin
December 12th, 2008, 03:43 PM
That's an interesting one too. I think I'd love to use core memory and use ferrite core memory or wirewrap memory/boards. I know wirewrap would be a pain but I'm still intruiged how non random access memory would be.

mloewen
December 12th, 2008, 04:43 PM
I learned FORTRAN IV in the early '70s using punch cards on IBM 3/60 and 3/70 mainframes. I have an IBM 029 and 129 keypunch in my collection, and a functional card reader. I moved on to CP/M systems in the early '80s, and still have my TRS-80 Model 4 as well as Kaypro and Osborne systems. I also worked on the biggest vacuum tube computer ever made, the SAGE AN/FSQ-7 with hundreds of blinking lights and switches, spinning tape drives and core memory.

However, I completely missed the DEC PDP systems. I worked on HP3000 minicomputers in the late '80s, but would dearly love to have a PDP-8 of some vintage. My other dream machine is an IMSAI 8080. I'm not ready to drop $1600 on an IMSAI, though.

http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/

NeXT
December 12th, 2008, 10:35 PM
In the last month I have seen so many IMSAI 8080s in the hands of people I know that your head would spin. I still wonder where the heck they found them.