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CP/M User
December 12th, 2008, 01:22 AM
Put this in the humor section if you want, though I'm fed up with the same old lights screwing me everytime I want to leave my workplace! :-x
The people in charge of running Traffic lights say it's all based on who's first to get to the lights! Rubbish I say because if I'm waiting to leave an estate and someone comes along on the main road off the estate and wants to enter the estate, they go first - even though I'm still waiting to get out! And get this, if people enterning the estate go before anyone has made it to the sensor for the lights to get out of the estate, you miss out - since the people always comming in go just before the people going out go. What happens is worse, you wait, wait & wait again, somebody else comes along the main road and wanting to enter the estate - and then they get first go again, so essentually they get two bytes of the cherry! And finally it's your turn! :-x You wait 5 or 6 minutes. Something seriously wrong there! :-x What bugs me though is during some stage you get a short period where there's no traffic comming along the main road and yet the lights don't change - I always felt lights had to change when nobody was coming and you're sitting there waiting for your turn! :-( I haven't been confident to report this nuisance spot cause I've heard stories of people being billed for what the is deemed to be wasting people's time, I figure since I've started working there, early last year, they probably owe me 200 hours of wasted waiting time! Apparentely though if lights are not flashing yellow, there working even though these lights are going through a terrible cycle which doesn't work well at all! :-(

I wish I had a gun like Christopher Lloyds character in Surburban Commando! So funny! :-D

Terry Yager
December 12th, 2008, 11:42 AM
Perhaps you're sitting to far back from the intersection. Determine where the sensors are located, and make sure you pull your car up to or beyond that point. (Of course, this doesn't work when there's another car in front of yours, unless you give them a gentle nudge or two).

--T

Ole Juul
December 12th, 2008, 01:08 PM
In this province, you can make a right on a red if you don't disrupt the traffic. So... in your case one would make a right and then a uie. Assuming that you are allowed to make a uie, that is. Here you can do it if it's not a commercial zone. If nobody is watching then all you do whatever. :) If a tree falls in the forest does it make a sound?... or something like that.

CP/M User
December 12th, 2008, 01:48 PM
Yeah I've actually tried to fool the lights by driving on the sensors - the main problem seems to be there being a couple of sensors, however it doesn't seem to register with these lights because while I've been there by myself occassionally trying to fool the lights, there have also been days when there's a lot of cars trying to get out of estate. There can be as many as 5 or 6 cars waiting to get out and one idiot comes along wanting to get in and they get first pick on the lights! Crazy! I generally pull up on the line or as close to it though I've also gone back to where the back sensors are, don't seem to make any difference! :-x

Yes it makes sense that if there's clearly safe to go on a Red light then you should be able to do it - however it's law in our state that when lights are in operation you must abide by them. I think the closest thing Australia has in relation to driving through anything with Red is in Queensland where you can go on a Red Arrow if it's safe to do so. I'm not even sure we can do that in our state - might check with the roads to see's legal and what's illegal. The most annoying thing I get is people doing a U-Turn which cuts off anyone doing a Left or Right turn, people doing a U-Turn -must- giveway to anything turning in the same direction! :-x

Personally, I'm totally serious when it comes to road rules and if I end up doing something and assuming that nobody is looking I simply cannot do wrong even if I can get away with it, cause as you're probably aware it's very difficult to assume you're not being watched when you're in surburia (a tree in the bush is much different!). Before you know it you pass this habit onto somebody else and before time everyone's doing it (probably even state a series of more accidents because people think they can sneek in on a red thinking it's safe - I dare say it maybe something to happen in the future as the roads become more clogged). In my case I'm exiting an estate filled with houses and people walking around and people spying on you from their Windows! ;-)

Terry Yager
December 12th, 2008, 02:04 PM
Do they have BigBrother traffic cams in Oz like they have here?

--T

Ole Juul
December 12th, 2008, 03:03 PM
I'm with you on the rules. That's what keeps the whole thing safe - being predictable. The rules are especially important when there's a lot of traffic, like in cities. I've done a lot of heavy traffic city driving in the past and that's where I'm most comfortable. I tend to be quick and decisive but still believe it is important to be a team player. If someone else doesn't know what you're doing, (or about to do) you're doing it wrong. Where I live now, you can drive backwards all day (and I have -hehe) without bothering anybody. We've actually got one stop sign you know. :) Anyway, rules or no rules, the funnyist thing I've seen in the city is a pedestrian on a Sunday morning standing on a deserted corner waiting for the light to change. Actually, that's pathetic.

Back on topic: In this province, and probably most places, traffic lights are considered a "traffic calming" measure. I believe that in a city it is not so important that things go fast, and more important that things go smoothly. However, in Vancouver BC they deliberately make the lights so that if you drive the limit or slower, you hit red on every intersection. IMNSHO that is an enviromental disaster! I think we wouldn't need so many rules and "traffic calming" measures if you had to learn the basics before you could get a license. When I first got mine years ago, I went out and bought a copy of the Traffic Act and read it from cover to cover. If I ever get in an accident, there is a very small chance that it'll be my fault. :)

CP/M User
December 12th, 2008, 03:08 PM
Terry Yager wrote:

Do they have BigBrother traffic cams in Oz like they have here?

In some areas they have some sort of camera at an intersection, usually their little black rounded cameras like the ones found in shops - they aren't used as speed cameras, though you can be sure that there maybe somebody looking at you through their television screen!

There's also speed cameras around, more trouble than what their worth if you ask me, cause many innocent people have got a speeding ticket from cameras which have recorded speeds from neighbourning cars - which get off scott free! :-o The solution is have more police on the roads and there will be less problems. Everyone knows that because there's less police around they maybe able to get away with speeding or doing the wrong thing. Technology should not be depended on in these cases and it'll eventually be worthless junk which will fine everyone driving through a green light!

Terry Yager
December 12th, 2008, 05:48 PM
The cams here are triggered by someone going thru on the red, then it takes a hi-rez snapshot of your license plate, and they mail the ticket to your (last known) address. I guess in some places they have speed cams too, but they are notoriously unreliable, and a good lawyer can usually beat one.

--T

CP/M User
December 13th, 2008, 09:30 PM
Terry Yager wrote:

The cams here are triggered by someone going thru on the red, then it takes a hi-rez snapshot of your license plate, and they mail the ticket to your (last known) address. I guess in some places they have speed cams too, but they are notoriously unreliable, and a good lawyer can usually beat one.

There was a case here a couple of days ago where a group of people took on a fine they received from a certain intersection and actually won their case because the Green Arrow wasn't staying on long enough and was congesting traffic as a result. What concerns me in cases where people take their case to court because they have the money to do so and win and some average Joe like myself getting a fine and not being able to afford the court fees or lawyer fees so pay the fine instead based on it being a faulty machine or the machine tracks another cars speed limit and records my rego plate. I'm concern that with more and more dodgy machines being put into place, the innocent are labeled guilty and the guilty get away and avoid a fine! :-x

Terry Yager
December 14th, 2008, 09:39 AM
T'was ever thus...

--T

paul
December 14th, 2008, 01:29 PM
Terry Yager wrote:
...and actually won their case because the Green Arrow wasn't staying on long enough and was congesting traffic as a result.

San Diego, CA has had red light cameras for about 13 years and their installation technician was a good friend of mine, so I took great interest in analyzing them to death. The biggest problem is that they show up all the previously-hidden defects in intersection design by penalizing those who enter into the red by just several tenths of a second - but don't necessarily create a hazard.

Yellow light times are set by the city to a CA state Highway Patrol standard based on speed limit, irrespective of how large or complex the intersection is to negotiate. At one intersection which had several thousand infractions a month, they experimentally increased the yellow time by 2/10ths second and it dropped by half. The problem is that the city has no incentive to give up their half of the $300 fine per infraction by optimizing the design, even though overall safety would be improved!

EDIT: Found the exact data from a report:

The most significant change in the number of violations occurred at the intersection of
Mission Bay Drive and Grand (1541) where the yellow change interval was extended
from 3.1 seconds to 4.7 seconds. This change resulted in an 88-percent decrease in the
number of violations.

And more:


When the yellow light interval at E. Mission Bay Dr. and Grand Ave. was finally increased from 3.0 seconds to 4.7 seconds, the photo citations dropped from average 2,265 per month to 205 per month.

My friend eventually discovered a 1-foot error in the placement of the trigger loop at one intersection and as a result confidence was lost and all the city's 12 or so cameras where shut down for several years.

Ole Juul
December 14th, 2008, 02:35 PM
>paul: "... they experimentally increased the yellow time by 2/10ths second and it dropped by half."

I was reading something recently about the amber light timing being a fiddle that some cities do to make money. To me, giving cities (or police) an incentive to create infractions is ethically questionable. I think it would be an interesting point to bring to a court case.

Kaypro
December 14th, 2008, 02:48 PM
After moving from British Columbia to Saskatchewan, I've noticed that the yellow lights have a different "feel" to them in Saskatchewan. I talked to someone else about this, and they were told that the Yellow lights in Saskatchewan are actually 1-2/10ths of a second longer than B.Cs. Interesting to say the least, and I agree with Ole Juul, giving incentive for that kind of thing is ethically questionable, and could almost be called entrapment.

In the city where I live in Canada, there are only about 2-4 Red light Camera assemblies in the entire city, and they don't seem to work half the time. We have no photo radar or speedcams that I'm aware of.

patscc
December 14th, 2008, 05:12 PM
See, y'all should move to the Midwest.

They recently replaced the "blinking red" warning light setup at an intersection in Plover, right outside Stevens Point, WI., with a proper traffic light.
After a couple of months, they ended taking it out again, and replacing it with the original "blinking red" setup.
Appearantly it confused all us poor potato farmers up here.

patscc

Ole Juul
December 14th, 2008, 05:49 PM
Blinking red lights can save time (and gas), but only if people know how to use them. In some places I've seen 4-way stops work well because the locals are used to them and know how to dance together. I like that. In other places they are a disaster because some people don't know who's turn it is and can't make up their minds. With reaction times counted in seconds, they might as well be drunk. To me a stop sign (or blinking red) is preferable to a red/amber/green and a yield sign is preferable to a stop sign. Still, you'd have to know the rules, be cooperative, and able to make up your mind, in order to take advantage of that concept... and I don't think all that's going to happen any time soon. :) Too many people don't seem to see the trafic from the top. If they did CP/M User wouldn't have to waste so much time, because some of the people entering the estate would have "been there, done that", see the situation, and wait for him to exit. At least around here, neither common sense nor curtesey is on the drivers test - but they should be.

Kaypro
December 15th, 2008, 09:28 AM
Well, the operative phrase there is "only if people know how to use". I cant even begin to count the number of times Ive pulled up at a 4 way stop, and there are 3 people already there, and they all just sit there. (I usually end up going before them all, and no one even makes a move when I do). If there was a Blinking Red, Im sure some of the people in my neighborhood would have just as much trouble with them too. They really should cover this stuff more exhaustively in Driver Ed...

patscc
December 15th, 2008, 12:31 PM
I can't really point any fingers. Had one of those moments today where you pull up to the stop sign and wait for it to change.
patscc

BG101
December 15th, 2008, 05:38 PM
You ought to see what we have to put up with here. Every sizeable junction, most roundabouts and quite a few entrances to side roads, along with most pedestrian crossings, are controlled by traffic lights - these have NO traffic sensors and seem to be timed to make you stop at EVERY junction, even in the middle of the night when yours is the only car on the road. It's ridiculous. There are several pedestrian crossings near where I live which also operate on timers (the push buttons make no difference). Most of the ones in the city centre are set up like this, they stop you even if no-one is in sight.

They even put traffic lights ON the roundabouts FFS. So you get a quarter of the way round and you can't exit. Defeats the whole point of having a roundabout.

One set of lights not far from me (entrance to the football ground) has been programmed to cycle to red, EVERY 60 SECONDS, then after less than 3 seconds change to green again. Day and night. This is occasionally set to normal operation so it's not a fault.

The times you have to stop and sit there waiting at a red light, even at 3AM, when you can clearly see there is nothing else on the road ... :mad: complete waste of time and petrol.

If you slow down traffic, it means there are MORE vehicles in a given area at a time, creating MORE congestion and pollution. This should be obvious to the muppets who run the "traffic management" here.


BG

Ole Juul
December 15th, 2008, 06:09 PM
Ya, smoother is better than stop and start. I'm sure England is bad. In Vancouver BC which is a more modern city and has a grid system, they have been putting stop signs on every second intersection in both directions all through the residential areas. The net result is that (no matter what speed), you have to stop and start your car, over and over again. The environmental impact of that is no doubt HUGE. These traffic engineers are hell bent to burn gas! This, in fact is the only result of these stop signs because the same rules still apply as before, ie. first come first served, and yield to traffic from the right. How hard can that be?

patscc
December 15th, 2008, 06:13 PM
I have many fond memories of trying to navigate traffic circles in the UK.
Particularly the first time I drove over there, stick on the wrong side (well, it's relative), car on the wrong side, and then traffic circles. Don't have many traffic circles here. I thought I was going out of my mind the first time I hit a multi-lane traffic circle with traffic lights. It's like musical chairs. If you're not in the correct lane before the light goes red, well, you'll just go round gain.


BG101 said...This should be obvious to the muppets who run the "traffic management" here.

Well, if they efficiently got rid of all the traffic, they'd be out of work, now wouldn't they ?
patscc

BG101
December 15th, 2008, 06:46 PM
Last week when I was driving through one of the large commercial "estates" on the outskirts, I noticed all the traffic signals were off ... and the traffic flowed beautifully. People took their turn, drove through when it was safe to do so and there was no problem. There have been a few other outages elsewhere with the same result. If you know how to drive, you don't need to be told when to stop and go. The council here are obsessed with regulating everything and are happy to spend as much of our money as they like, to do this.

At least we don't have speed cameras every 200 yards (on both sides of the road) like they do in Stoke-on-Trent. Now that IS taking the p!ss. I couldn't believe it, nearly had to turn the warning siren off on my sat-nav as it was driving me round the bend!



BG

im_an_alien
December 16th, 2008, 05:21 AM
http://img58.imageshack.us/img58/6949/xkcdlonglightws3.png
xkcd FTW.

CP/M User
December 20th, 2008, 12:19 PM
Funnily enough on Friday those Traffic Lights were out - power had been cut to them, it was almost as if someone had done something to the traffic box which operates those lights! However, power had also been cut to the whole estate as well!
Personally I thought perhaps someone would come and fix those traffic lights, though my worst fears were confirmed after the power had come back on and they were back to their horrible operating state. :-x If someone had some something to the box to blow the traffic lights they might do it again - be very frustrating if that triggers the power off to the estate again. Guess you could call it Traffic Light Rage! :-?

DimensionDude
December 20th, 2008, 06:23 PM
In the early morning hour when I'm going to work, it seems that the traffic lights are red by default on the main road. Why does the nonexistent cross-traffic get the green? After getting the green and crossing the intersection, the light immediately turns red again. What's up with that? I won't mention the city police sitting along that main road waiting for us poor, working class slobs to exceed the speed limit.

Kent

Terry Yager
December 20th, 2008, 09:06 PM
If someone had some something to the box to blow the traffic lights they might do it again - be very frustrating if that triggers the power off to the estate again. Guess you could call it Traffic Light Rage! :-?

Heh, years ago, when I worked on a carnival lot, we were playing Mt. Pleasant, MI. The lot man stuck my LQ right under one of the light towers, which was kewl by me, since I partied all night anyways, but was pissing off the ol' lady & kid, as they wanted to sleep. I got tired of her bitching and him wailing all night, so I determined to shut off that damn light. I opened the access panel and found a likely-looking wire. When I snipped it...the whole fairgrounds went dark! Not just the lot lights, all the buildings, everything. Lucky for me I had never chosen a career as an electrician!

--T

CP/M User
December 21st, 2008, 12:25 PM
Terry Yager wrote:

Heh, years ago, when I worked on a carnival lot, we were playing Mt. Pleasant, MI. The lot man stuck my LQ right under one of the light towers, which was kewl by me, since I partied all night anyways, but was pissing off the ol' lady & kid, as they wanted to sleep. I got tired of her bitching and him wailing all night, so I determined to shut off that damn light. I opened the access panel and found a likely-looking wire. When I snipped it...the whole fairgrounds went dark! Not just the lot lights, all the buildings, everything. Lucky for me I had never chosen a career as an electrician!

Yeah where I work it's funny when the power goes out cause people in the estate expect the maintenance crew to fix it! Every-time this happens and every-time we give them the same responce, contact your Electrical Service Provider - not that it helps since Electricity comes from the same place and if the whole estate is out then it's upto those services to fix it! Amazing though that those people expect a gounds maintenance person to do the world for them and most of them treat you like a piece of garbadge, at least our superiors treat us well, though their superiors are a bit rough around the edges! :-o

Ole Juul
December 21st, 2008, 06:31 PM
T said: "... found a likely-looking wire. When I snipped it...the whole fairgrounds went dark! "
Do you have weld notches in your side cutters? My new ones don't.

Terry Yager
December 21st, 2008, 06:57 PM
Do you have weld notches in your side cutters? My new ones don't.

I dunno, I used a pair of Klines...and they were someone else's! (You didn't think I'd actually incriminate myself, did'ja)? Either way, I never went back to pick 'em up again (need I mention, I dropped 'em real fast-like). Didn't matter, everyone seemed to know whodunit, they just couldn't prove anything. (For some reason, some of the ol'-timers there still call me 'Sparky' whenever they see me).

--T

CP/M User
December 21st, 2008, 08:41 PM
I would have thought electrocution for split second would have been punishment enough! :-D

Terry Yager
December 21st, 2008, 08:52 PM
I would have thought electrocution for split second would have been punishment enough! :-D

Let's just say, I never tried that trick again...

--T

Ole Juul
December 21st, 2008, 09:26 PM
I would have thought electrocution for split second would have been punishment enough! :-D
That only works for some people. Here at home I typically work on the 'lectrics while they're live. Its quicker and the odd time you touch something its really only a shock - nothing that one loud swear word won't fix. Here in Canada we only have 117vac single phase for most home wiring. You can't really hurt youself with that stuff. Although 220 is used for dryers workshop motors etc. and that packs a bit of a punch and warrents more care. Remembering that those are RMS values and you gotta multiply by 1.4 to get the peak. The actual statistics regarding accidents (I went looking :)) are all for 600vac industrial wiring and the people who get hurt are usually carpenters who are not aware that such high voltages are used on some sites.

Anyway, I'm rambling! But I gotta tell ya: I have a friend who is an electrician and he will actually wet his finger and put it in a socket to see if its live! No kidding! There are obviously different sensibilities regarding this stuff.

Terry Yager
December 21st, 2008, 10:23 PM
While I often fiddle with 110 wiring live, I usually kill the circuit for 220v. And, I'm always very cautious around CRTs, dead or alive (a lesson learned at a very early age). I did once see a guy named 'Kong" get thrown 6 feet thru the air when he got too close to a 440 3-phase junction box on a rainy night, so Ive had a healthy respect for live 440 boxes ever since. Never had the privilege of playing with 600v though.

--T

Ole Juul
December 21st, 2008, 11:06 PM
Ya, 600v is just academic for me. What you don't know CAN hurt you! The rule for me too is no live for 220. I did have my first (and inadvertent) experience with it when I moved into this old building. Someone had made some strange arrangement with a not fully hooked up stove. I had a "what was that!" experience and it took me a while to figure it out, but let me tell you: 220 is NOT 110!

Old guitar amplifiers have a bit of a kick on the plate voltage too. I have a couple of unforgettable memories from my teenage years. It's a wonder we survived the learning experiences of youth.... or did we?

CP/M User
December 22nd, 2008, 01:55 AM
Ole Juul wrote:

That only works for some people. Here at home I typically work on the 'lectrics while they're live. Its quicker and the odd time you touch something its really only a shock - nothing that one loud swear word won't fix. Here in Canada we only have 117vac single phase for most home wiring. You can't really hurt youself with that stuff. Although 220 is used for dryers workshop motors etc. and that packs a bit of a punch and warrents more care. Remembering that those are RMS values and you gotta multiply by 1.4 to get the peak. The actual statistics regarding accidents (I went looking :)) are all for 600vac industrial wiring and the people who get hurt are usually carpenters who are not aware that such high voltages are used on some sites.

Anyway, I'm rambling! But I gotta tell ya: I have a friend who is an electrician and he will actually wet his finger and put it in a socket to see if its live! No kidding! There are obviously different sensibilities regarding this stuff.

Takin' my joke a little bit too seriously aren't we? ;-)

Ain't it the voltage which is harmless?
I thought it's the Amps and Watts which can do the real damage.

Terry Yager
December 22nd, 2008, 08:21 AM
Ole Juul wrote:
Takin' my joke a little bit too seriously aren't we? ;-)

Joke? There's nothing humorous about electrocution! It's only fun until someone's fingernails get melted off.

--T

Ole Juul
December 22nd, 2008, 09:22 AM
CP/M User: Ain't it the voltage which is harmless?
I thought it's the Amps and Watts which can do the real damage.
Of course. I was just kidding around. The thing to watch for is that you don't get enough volts going through your heart that you will draw enough amperage to do damage. That, of course, will depend on your skin resistance at the time and your wisdom (or not!) in using both hands or taking off your shoes. The magic number that is usually used (IIRC) is 18 milliamps. They use a fraction of that (4ma?) as a limit in medical electronics. It's pretty easy to remain safe, either in daily electrical practice, or equipment design. Anyway, for some reason I've always found a humorous side to high voltages. :)

PS: People get hurt from distribution AC because the voltages are fairely high and there is an unlimited availability of power from a human body point of view.

BG101
December 22nd, 2008, 10:47 AM
You're lucky on that side of the pond having 110v, usually 55v either side of ground I believe? Our 240v supply (neutral is at ground potential) is lethal in comparison. Continental European 220v is almost as bad. We tend to use site transformers (110v) for power tools at work.

Mind you, I've had plenty of minor shocks - once at around age 5 or thereabouts I had wired up a string of light fittings - obviously mum didn't see what I was up to - and put my finger round the back of one of them, all I got was a tingling in my finger :D

I've had very painful belts off exposed terminals during my time in the TV servicing trade and electronic manufacturing/testing. Most painful was probably the shock I had off a CRT anode terminal, I thought I had discharged it properly but I obviously hadn't, the bloody spark jumped 3 inches from the terminal to my finger and my whole arm hurt for at least half an hour.


BG

Ole Juul
December 22nd, 2008, 11:30 AM
BG101 said: "You're lucky on that side of the pond having 110v, usually 55v either side of ground I believe? Our 240v supply (neutral is at ground potential) is lethal in comparison. Continental European 220v is almost as bad. We tend to use site transformers (110v) for power tools at work."
They're even worse off in Japan where they only have 100V! That must have some serious drawbacks.

Actually our 110 as its called, is single phase. Neutral is at ground. We usually use 117 for calculation and I notice it usually measures a little over 120 in most places. Our 220 is two phase - plus and minus 110 each side of ground. So yeah, you can get the whole 220 X 1.414 = 311 volts peak. That can harm you.

In one sence we're lucky with 110 because its so safe. On the other hand it's less efficient for motors and such. It's kind of handy to have both. People with a bit of savvy can put in a few 220 plugs for bigger tools. I do that in my workshop.

Site transformers? I've not heard of those before. Hmm, more expense and more power loss I guess.

CP/M User
December 22nd, 2008, 12:23 PM
Terry Yager wrote:

Joke? There's nothing humorous about electrocution! It's only fun until someone's fingernails get melted off.

Naturally I don't believe electrocution is funny either, though my experience with Electricity (which is 240v here or something!), while it seems funny now, can be a bit scary when something explodes. That is at least when I was a kid and had to get the large fan from a Garage, place it on the bench switch it on <bang> & had to quickly switch off the power point - it's one experience I clearly recall as a kid which seems funny now, though I remember having this fear of plugging in fans and switching them on for quite some time. I remember when I was working with my grandfather (before he passed away in the late '90s), he was getting all these old electrical things as well, computers for example. I was a bit concerned they would blowup on power up! :-o
So there's an element there which I find amusing as well as an element which gives me concern. I remember when Mums TV went on the blink a couple of years ago, she wanted to get it fixed, I wanted to throw it out and get a whole new one. TVs to me carry a lot of voltage, their quite sophisticated it looked as if it was a problem with the picture tube - throw it out, TVs are cheap enough nowadays anyway, guess their only bad in landfill! :-(

Ole Juul
December 22nd, 2008, 06:41 PM
CP/M User " ... it looked as if it was a problem with the picture tube - throw it out, ..."
Sounds like you missed out on a learning experience. :( You wouldn't do that with a computer would you? I'm willing to bet it was something simple! (just razzin ya) :)

That reminds me when my kid was little and we didn't have TV (I still don't.), and he picked one up at a yard sale. No picture, no sound. It was full of rattly bits. So I felt sorry for him and took it apart. It soon became apparent that this TV had been thrown! Anyway, to make a long story short: The circuit board was broken into two pieces and, figuring there was nothing to loose, simply took my soldering iron and bridged all the traces again. Voila! It worked, and kept doing so for years. In fact, I think it's still around somewhere. I never throw stuff out.... bad karma. :)

CP/M User
December 22nd, 2008, 11:23 PM
Ole Juul wrote:

Sounds like you missed out on a learning experience. :( You wouldn't do that with a computer would you? I'm willing to bet it was something simple! (just razzin ya) :)

Mate if you saw what the picture tube was doin' you would have thrown it out as well! Yes there was once a time when I had to get my Monitor for my Amstrad CPC6128 repaired which was a straightfoward problem to fix, though to turn a TV set on and have it flickerning madly it appeared the CRT had "had" it and since those things have lots of volts running threw them - better off to bin it!

That reminds me when my kid was little and we didn't have TV (I still don't.), and he picked one up at a yard sale. No picture, no sound. It was full of rattly bits. So I felt sorry for him and took it apart. It soon became apparent that this TV had been thrown! Anyway, to make a long story short: The circuit board was broken into two pieces and, figuring there was nothing to loose, simply took my soldering iron and bridged all the traces again. Voila! It worked, and kept doing so for years. In fact, I think it's still around somewhere. I never throw stuff out.... bad karma. :)

Well I'm no solderning buff - sure I had to do some electronics at School and then in a Diploma of Technology course as part of Physics, however I stand by my judgement that a TV is a serious piece of electronics (due to the screen), and has been linked to Electrical Fires within homes. I also heard stories of TV technicans being electrocuted (even when a TV has been unused for a while) cause of the amount of electricity collected. There may have even been the odd death with that! Sure when we got rid of our TV it was at a time when our Council were doing a hard rubbish collection from our nature strip, which mean't if anyone wanted to take the TV off our hands and risk the chance of death, then that's their risk (we actually have to cut the electical lead though).

Perhaps in other countries which run 110v it maybe possible to avoid death when playing with TV sets, though because we messing around with 240v here, it's not worth it - even if you want to save a few bucks, life is priceless!!

Ole Juul
December 23rd, 2008, 12:06 AM
CP/M User: Perhaps in other countries which run 110v it maybe possible to avoid death when playing with TV sets, though because we messing around with 240v here, it's not worth it - even if you want to save a few bucks, life is priceless!!
Yes that's the bottom line for sure, "life is priceless". :)

Regarding the 110 or 240: that is just the supply voltage. The high voltage is generated inside the TV set and is independent, so to speak, of the supply. It is needed for the acceleration of the beam. The voltage is stored in capacitors which will lose their charge after a while, but in some cases it can stay there for a surprisingly long time. People usually just discharge them before they get "involved". A screwdriver works. (if it's got an insulated handle :)) There's actually an old electricians trick: keep one hand in your pocket!

zane
December 24th, 2008, 03:02 PM
voltage acts thru potential.
grabbing a hot outlet while being insulated, you know its hot, minimal potential.
a hole in your boot and a worn breaker
can take the potential to infinity, could be very bad results.
with 120 most injuries are from the reaction, jerk back with a screwdriver
in your hand, elbow into that steel
higher powers, can boil you inside, blow out muscle, seen guys with light burns on their hands but lungs toasted from gasping in superheated air.

Electricity is funny, just not in a funny way.
Just dont put yourself in a bad posistion,
and if getting tips off the net, triple check
for answers, many idiots out there.

Light turned green, gotta drive:mrgreen:back on topic not

Merry Christmas

Terry Yager
December 25th, 2008, 07:23 AM
Light turned green, gotta drive:mrgreen:back on topic not

Merry Christmas

Ahh, I think that explains a lot of things. The guys who program the lights do a lot of texting behind the wheel, so they program the light for what they think is a reasonable length of time to get their message out. Must be slow thumb-typers...

--T

CP/M User
December 25th, 2008, 12:21 PM
Terry Yager wrote:

Ahh, I think that explains a lot of things. The guys who program the lights do a lot of texting behind the wheel, so they program the light for what they think is a reasonable length of time to get their message out. Must be slow thumb-typers...

Speaking of which I found another dodgy set of Traffic Lights yesturday. We simply waited, waited and waited and there was no oncomming traffic and then when that traffic finally arrived, the lights had turn red for them and it was our turn!! Funny in a way, though annoying that traffic had to wait since there was no oncomming traffic! Bit hard to say since we were on a main Highway and there were several main junction roads which came into play - so they might of had a green light for them where there was nothing there but I don't really know for sure - I just presumed the oncomming traffic had the Green.

TandyMan100
January 13th, 2009, 06:54 AM
In this province, you can make a right on a red if you don't disrupt the traffic. So... in your case one would make a right and then a uie. Assuming that you are allowed to make a uie, that is. Here you can do it if it's not a commercial zone. If nobody is watching then all you do whatever. :) If a tree falls in the forest does it make a sound?... or something like that.

"If a tree falls, and nobody hears it, does it make a sound?" would be the quote you're looking for :rolleyes: