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frozenfire75i
January 4th, 2009, 09:43 AM
Do you have audience while you work? I know I sure do, four of my 12 cats are watching me unpack a new pot ;-)

http://www.ibm5150.net/cattime.jpg

channelmaniac
January 4th, 2009, 10:44 AM
12 cats?

Didn't I see you on the Cat Collector episode of Animal Precinct on the Discovery Channel?

I kiiiiiiid... :D Nice cats!

Terry Yager
January 4th, 2009, 10:55 AM
My dog(s) couldn't care less what I'm doing, unless there's food involved, then they monitor my every movement.

--T

TomFCS
January 4th, 2009, 11:35 AM
OOOOHHHHH!! Nice picture. The eyes on that black one are scaring me a bit though... :) Just superstition I guess. How did you get them to pose so nicely?

rebeltaz
January 4th, 2009, 07:40 PM
I love the black cat! All of the cats I've ever had since I was a kid have been black. But TWELVE?! My Gosh!

Until he was hit by a car right before Christmas,I had a puppy who would sit right beside me and watch every move I made whether I was working on electronics or mechanics. If you'd seen it, he was almost like... "Watchya doin' Pop?"

:rip:

Unknown_K
January 4th, 2009, 08:05 PM
I have a house full of cats too, some being lap cats (typing with one in my lap now). Yes they do like to watch me work on things, some love watching my CRTs (mostly the mouse cursor) for long periods.

It is kind of odd waking up to a bunch of cats on my entertainment center and on the bed watching me (this is after they have been fed by others in the house so its not like they want me to feed them). So I just make sure they are out before I go to bed and shut the door.

Druid6900
January 4th, 2009, 08:09 PM
Although I had 15 cats, at one time, and 12 doesn't seem unusual to me at all, I'm down to 4 and their only interest in computers seems to be sleeping on top of the piles of them.

When I'm actually working on systems, especially test jigs, for their safety, they are on the other side of the doors to my work areas.

patscc
January 4th, 2009, 08:36 PM
Currently I've only two, but there's one in particular who's mission in life seems to be finding an open box to urinate in. If there's something in it, say circuit boards, oh well...
patscc

wmmullaney
January 5th, 2009, 05:34 AM
12 cats??? Wow. I have 1. :( She dosn't care about anything but going out about every 5 minuets then coming back in to eat...

BG101
January 5th, 2009, 09:12 AM
Hope you don't mind, I've set this as my screen background :mrgreen: .. used to have cats myself and I miss them :(






BG

barythrin
January 5th, 2009, 09:24 AM
The only audience I get once and a while are end users watching me fix their problems. I'm not sure when they have that free time, I guess between walking around and trying to figure out what policies they can break or what they can delete they'll swing by and watch me work.

It's ok though, don't feed em and they tend to leave you alone after a while.

Unknown_K
January 5th, 2009, 11:53 AM
I don't mind cats watching me, but people watching me work piss me off. It probably has something to do with cats not being able to talk and tell me how to do the job.

Terry Yager
January 5th, 2009, 12:05 PM
I'm kinda the opposite. I like doing stuff in front of people, explaining everything, teaching them, bullsh!tting with 'em, whatever...

--T

CP/M User
January 5th, 2009, 01:19 PM
I know I had an audience while I work - generally their nosy people and hide behind the bushes and pretend to be driving around when their actually spying on us!

We generally have a lot of time consuming work to do and to be bugged by these people only makes the job worse - they even expect us to do jobs which we don't even do - like fixing the power to their home and fixing footpaths which are broken or are simply out of alignment! Yawn!

The nerve of some people is they even spend time driving around & finding stuff their not happy with and producing a book of all the things which need fixing!

If it's not those people it's the people walking by - some of them are good people, though there's others which treat you like a piece of garbadge and they acknowledge this my allowing their dogs to crap everywhere and expect us to clean it up! Fortunately I haven't had to fix this - though someone has to.

It'll be mighty interesting to see what happens after we've gone!

frozenfire75i
January 5th, 2009, 03:06 PM
I don't mind ppl watching me while I work, I like to teach them some things... But If you get a kid or a person that won't shut up talking or asking ?'s then that will drive me nuts!

Unknown_K
January 5th, 2009, 03:18 PM
I'm kinda the opposite. I like doing stuff in front of people, explaining everything, teaching them, bullsh!tting with 'em, whatever...

--T


I like talking to people and explaining how things work etc, but when I have actual work to do I don't like being interupted every 5 minutes or doing something to keep the people staring at me amused.

To be honest I like a messy desk, to wear shorts or sweatpants and a tshirt, and rock cranking on the stereo when I work.

cl3mens
January 5th, 2009, 04:28 PM
I love the look on the face of the cat sitting to the right! :) Looks like he is very pleased with something you did.

My cat likes to sit in my lap or take a nap behind me in the chair when I sit at the computer. But she is not very interested in the things I do.

A true slacker: http://wernstroem.cl3m.net/disk0/0000-Random/DSC02190.JPG

frozenfire75i
January 5th, 2009, 06:00 PM
HE HE Yours looks pretty happy there


I love the look on the face of the cat sitting to the right! :) Looks like he is very pleased with something you did.

My cat likes to sit in my lap or take a nap behind me in the chair when I sit at the computer. But she is not very interested in the things I do.

A true slacker: http://wernstroem.cl3m.net/disk0/0000-Random/DSC02190.JPG

Druid6900
January 5th, 2009, 08:09 PM
Personally, I'd rather have the cats watching.

I don't have time to teach people what I know and they don't. That's what schools are for. I'm also not particularly fond of stupid questions.

Cats, on the other hand, know exactly what you are doing, imply that you're doing it badly, could do it better themselves but don't because a) they don't have opposable thumbs and, b) they don't give a s**t.

patscc
January 5th, 2009, 08:24 PM
Personally, I can't stand an audience. If I'm working somewhere where I'm in a cube, I always have to rearrange the interior so that my back & monitors are facing inwards. It also allows me to glare, and throw things at people trying to stand outside my cube & chatter.

I've found that when people see what I'm doing they get encouraged to ask questions, especially when it doesn't concern them, or when they're bored, and then I get so caught up in f**king with them that I lose track of what I was originally trying to do.

At home, regardless of how I might feel about it, the cats will either watch or not, on their own terms.

patscc

CP/M User
January 5th, 2009, 09:42 PM
frozenfire75i wrote:

I don't mind ppl watching me while I work, I like to teach them some things... But If you get a kid or a person that won't shut up talking or asking ?'s then that will drive me nuts!

These people I mention are not your everyday crowd expecting you to stand up on stage and do some kind of Act. These are you're upper crust smucks which cry wolf when their not happy with something. Fortunately most of the work I can do I can put up with to a degree, though because these people have all the time in the world, they simply drive around in their Mercs, BMWs or Whatever and whinge and complain to our superiors. Never hear any complaints about the guy which does nothing there - and it's always the people who work which have to suffer. So to carry that to tolerate that over a few years, would go nuts!

nige the hippy
January 6th, 2009, 05:44 AM
I hate people seeing/watching what I'm doing (unless they're small ones),
...but animals... I used to live with a Macaw that used to "help" in that whatever I was doing, it tried to do too (sometimes after I'd left the room). I'd often find documents with random lines of characters scattered about them, and we used to argue about who got to use the mouse. DIY was impossible too, screws and rawlplugs were fair game for both the parrot (inside) and the crow (outside) to remove & hide, and the parrot learnt to use the phone too (Hello, ...hello?, ...hello!, ... hello?....)

BG101
January 6th, 2009, 07:55 AM
and the parrot learnt to use the phone too (Hello, ...hello?, ...hello!, ... hello?....):mrgreen: I can just imagine that :mrgreen:





BG

barythrin
January 6th, 2009, 08:15 AM
they simply drive around in their Mercs, BMWs or Whatever and whinge and complain to our superiors.

So keeping on my curiosity streak this morning, care to share what it is you do for a living? I do system administration on servers but we don't have a helpdesk so I get that work too, outside of setting up/maintaining windows/linux servers and other applications we run here.

Terry Yager
January 6th, 2009, 11:39 AM
I have a love/hate relationship with birds. They can be a lot of fun, but such a pita to keep up after. And when one decides to turn mean...ever tasted parrot gumbo...?

--T

BuggZ
January 6th, 2009, 11:41 AM
I do some part time work as a product demonstrator for Apple products (Macs, iPods, etc). I usually enjoy talking to people and explaining how the systems work but what really annoys me is when you are talking to a customer and someone else walks by and shouts "Macs suck" and then just walks off. Or even worse, stands there and starts spewing all kinds of bullsh*t (most of it wrong) about how much better their favorite brand of computer is.

CP/M User
January 6th, 2009, 01:26 PM
barythrin wrote:

So keeping on my curiosity streak this morning, care to share what it is you do for a living?

Occupation: Chief Technical Weed Supervisor
That's what I do until someone cries Wolf and the job becomes Maintenance! :-x For some reason with work which falls along those lines, people are always watching you and if their not driving, walking around, they spy on you from their home!

I dislike people like that, because they simply have nothing better else to do and would rather be slackers themselves by keeping tabs on others.

I do system administration on servers but we don't have a helpdesk so I get that work too, outside of setting up/maintaining windows/linux servers and other applications we run here.

Those jobs simply don't have that aspect to them, which is strange cause it's a lot easier to play a game of Solitare behind a computer than working out in the field - and yet people choose to keep an eye on people doing hard physical work than people behind a computer! :-o However I guess I'm being unfair here cause working in an office you can have lots of Cameras pointed at you and you wouldn't even know it! I guess the big question is who watches the watchers?

CP/M User
January 6th, 2009, 01:31 PM
BuggZ wrote:

I do some part time work as a product demonstrator for Apple products (Macs, iPods, etc). I usually enjoy talking to people and explaining how the systems work but what really annoys me is when you are talking to a customer and someone else walks by and shouts "Macs suck" and then just walks off. Or even worse, stands there and starts spewing all kinds of bullsh*t (most of it wrong) about how much better their favorite brand of computer is.

If some Mac walked by and said "they suck", I'd be LOL!! :-D

Terry Yager
January 6th, 2009, 01:39 PM
Occupation: Chief Technical Weed Supervisor

Round here we just call him 'The Lawn Guy'. He walks around once a month with a can of RoundUp and sprays everything in sight (including some p'ticularly luscious 'decorative' herbage).

--T

CP/M User
January 6th, 2009, 02:23 PM
Terry Yager wrote:

Round here we just call him 'The Lawn Guy'. He walks around once a month with a can of RoundUp and sprays everything in sight (including some p'ticularly luscious 'decorative' herbage).

And that 'decorative' herbage believe it or not is usually the stuff running out of control. We also work on foreign grasses - anyone with knowledge about Grasses knows that Grasses come from Grasslands and it's always purpose is to produce grasslands - which puts Grasses as one of the most invasive plants going around, so to use foreign grasses instead of native grasses means you're generating more pest plant removal - hence more maintenance.

Yzzerdd
January 6th, 2009, 02:50 PM
We also work on foreign grasses - anyone with knowledge about Grasses knows that Grasses come from Grasslands and it's always purpose is to produce grasslands - which puts Grasses as one of the most invasive plants going around, so to use foreign grasses instead of native grasses means you're generating more pest plant removal - hence more maintenance.

Around here we call that "job security" LOL.

--Jack

barythrin
January 6th, 2009, 03:14 PM
Since we're in the completely off-topic category anyway, what's the most common native grass there? Just curious since I know a few common grasses here in the US but am wondering if they're different in other countries or if we're all working with similar breeds. (Common here for lawns is St. Augustine, bermuda grass.. atleast in Texas where we have high heat and little rain those are most common).

CP/M User
January 6th, 2009, 03:16 PM
Yzzerdd wrote:

Around here we call that "job security" LOL.

Well around here Jack, it's a long way from Job Security because sooner or later people will question the progression - at least that's what I try to work to. Without progression you might as well operate a Merry-Go-Round, people will ask why I should work there. Weeding -must- progress as well to guarantee less weeding will follow that weeding. In order for that to happen any area in question - but more importantly an area which has no natural seedbank needs to be planted. Bushland's are different so it's easier to remove the foreign plants and let the natural take over (whatever that maybe - it may not necessarily be bush, but a swamp or a coastal dune or even a grassland land - though even those areas consist of natural plants which tollerate those conditions - the term bush is generally considered to be a type of forest with lots of Trees and middle storey plants). Areas such as my workplace where the soil has been brought in (from what appears to be the local tip - or landfill), everything needs to progress from what I do, which means it needs a strategy of removing the foreign plants and ensuring foreign plants are kept to a minimum.

Terry Yager
January 6th, 2009, 03:40 PM
The plants I was thinking of are the kind that 'decorate' your mind from the inside...(not mine, of course, but the neighbors').

I know what ya mean about invasive species tho, my Morning Glorys are encroaching on everything. I love 'em, but I'm afraid I'll have to end up destroying all or most of 'em, to keep them from volunteering in areas where they are not wanted.

Aren't invasive species kinda hard to define when it comes to people's lawns tho? Most of the grasses that folks grow on purpose are imported from other areas, so a true naturalist would consider them the invasive species encroaching on the native weedstock. Hmmn...

--T

CP/M User
January 6th, 2009, 04:03 PM
barythrin wrote:

Since we're in the completely off-topic category anyway, what's the most common native grass there? Just curious since I know a few common grasses here in the US but am wondering if they're different in other countries or if we're all working with similar breeds. (Common here for lawns is St. Augustine, bermuda grass.. atleast in Texas where we have high heat and little rain those are most common).

Yes we usually call Bermuda grass, Couch grass. It seems to be a grass which has been developed and distributed worldwide - it doesn't seem to be a grass which naturally occurs anywhere. For us it's become a pest plant, mostly in areas which have been disturbed - the most annoying thing about that grass is removing it by hand, unless it's quite small and it's in sandy soil (which it seems to like) it's very difficult to remove.

In the natural world different parts of Australia have different varieties of grasses - which vary from the region their found in. Of the types of grasses found here there are different species of plants found in the same genus - for instance Wallaby Grass there's several species within that group found locally (some Wallaby Grasses also go under different Genuses because their quite separate from the regular ones though look the same, only to be different because their found in Swampy Areas) - across Australia there maybe Hundreds though. Spear grasses also have several species found locally, as well as Tussock grasses. And then there's this Weeping grass which some people believe there are variations of that grass, though it's a grass found on it's own around here to belong to one Genus and species. In the Mountain country there's a Forest Wire Grass, though none found in the lower areas which suggest it needs a very nutrient Rich soil and moisture to keep it going. Not a lot of Australia has Nutrient Rich soil and most natural plants don't necessarily need that here, or if they do they get it from other plants which release Nutrients into the soil.

Along with the Natural grasses around here are the foreign grasses as well - which come from all over the place. Sweet Vernal Grass for instance comes from Europe and temperate Asia, Browntop Bent also comes from Europe, Wild Oats is thought to have come from the Mediterranean region, Blowfly grass or Quaking grass and it's smaller cousin the shivery grass or lesser quaking grass also from the Mediterranean as well as the Great Brome or Ripgut brome. Prairie grass comes from America, Pampas grass comes from South America, Barnyard grass comes from Europe and India! African lovegrass comes from South Africa! Yorkshire fog grass from Europe, Barley grass from Europe and Asia, Ryegrasses are from the Mediterranean region & Serrated tussock from South America as is Paspalum, Kikuyu is another one from Africa. Phalaris, paradoxa & lesser canary grasses all come from the Mediterranean, Annual beardgrass from Europe and Asia, Slender Pigeon grass comes from Central and South America, and then there's Winter grass which comes from Europe, and Veldtgrasses which come from South Africa - those seem to be the ones I work on most, though I've seen all of these grasses around in my travels. Fortunately the ones I haven't seen such as Mexican Feather grass are ones which have been found by people locally (being sold in shops as something else), though is suppose to be prohibited from sale in our state.

The biggest issue though is the names of grasses - Common names generally have different names in other places - so half those names are different depending on what name catches on - which is one reason why we have Latin names for plants which consist of the Genus and species. I recognise Bermuda grass cause that's one of the names my book suggests for what I call Couch - which Latin name is Cynodon dactylon.

Because I mentioned a large variety of plants which come from places like the Mediterranean, Africa, America, Europe, it may well be those grasses are found in different parts of those regions which depends on the conditions for which they grow in. However just about any sort of grass can naturalise in a totally foreign area and become dominant which is when these grasses become pest plants.

Terry Yager
January 6th, 2009, 04:42 PM
However just about any sort of grass can naturalise in a totally foreign area and become dominant which is when these grasses become pest plants.

My point exactly...how do you do it?

--T

CP/M User
January 6th, 2009, 05:30 PM
Terry Yager wrote:

My point exactly...how do you do it?

In our area I'm fortunate to have natural bushlands which consists of the natural vegetation. Though it also helps to understand the area you live in by understanding Geology and in our case what the land used to be - and having Remnant Vegetation which would go with that area - though in our case we've also got fragments of Swampland which remain - we live very close to this swampland, though are very close to a Heathland where the soil is very sandy and has some old Dunes which were formed from the old Inland Sea which turned into that Swampland.

There's also information in the form of local vegetation lists and maps which try to describe how the area used to be on the Internet and what it looks like now as well as local Nurseries which produce local plant stock from seed collected. So in our area while we have small areas which remain unaffected a lot research and work has been done to provide information about the local vegetation.

In terms of foreign plants which are a pest in our area, the thing to look at is how dominant they invade an area, biodiversity & monoculture can be the tell tell signs of an invasion of a plant (not necessarily a grass), though in our area biodiversity is basically what I see in the natural world - some natural vegetation communities may actually have only a few key species and have something dominant which grows over a large area of it, though if another plant can co-exist with that then it will. Pine trees here for example simply have nothing around them because of Pine Needles, Root structure, though I suspect that in their natural habitat they have other plants which will co-exist with them.

BG101
January 6th, 2009, 06:30 PM
I'm not too sure about other plants coexisting with pine trees - they seem to kill off everything else. I don't know if pine trees are native to England (I suspect not) but where they grow there is practically no undergrowth at all. Pine is grown commercially here in some areas.




BG

CP/M User
January 6th, 2009, 07:32 PM
BG101 wrote:

I'm not too sure about other plants coexisting with pine trees - they seem to kill off everything else. I don't know if pine trees are native to England (I suspect not) but where they grow there is practically no undergrowth at all. Pine is grown commercially here in some areas.

There's two Pines I'm familiar with which are invasive once they reach the age of 7 years - why 7 years I'm unsure, though that's when it first starts flowering - at least that's what happens with the Radiata pine (or Monterey pine) which comes from the United States - the other one being a Maritime Pine (or Cluster Pine) which is found in Soutern Europe and Northern Africa. However different species of pines around found around the US, other areas which have them are the Mediterranean and even one in South America. Australia has a few species of Pines, though nothing found locally unless people put She-oaks in that category. North of Melbourne and Victoria (up state) there's White Cypress which some put down as a kind of pine - though it's in the Conifer family.

Certainally in the UK to have Pine plantations would produce the same kinds of results like Australia where it generates a monoculture of keeping other plants out. You'd probably have to go to the states and find what grows naturally with Pines - certainally with the Radiata Pine. I believe it's this Pine which is associated with the Death Cap Mushroom as well! Eating it will result in Death 24hrs later.

Terry Yager
January 6th, 2009, 08:25 PM
But, what would happen if an endangered native species of crabgrass were found growing in the middle of someone's $10,00.00 imported-sod Kentucky Blue Grass lawn?

--T

patscc
January 6th, 2009, 08:39 PM
Terry Yager said...middle of someone's $10,00.00

On a moon-less night, you blacken your face, launch a raid , and yank it out.
(Assuming the lawn owner doesn't care about endangered plants, that is )

patscc

CP/M User
January 6th, 2009, 11:07 PM
Terry Yager wrote:

But, what would happen if an endangered native species of crabgrass were found growing in the middle of someone's $10,00.00 imported-sod Kentucky Blue Grass lawn?

Difficult to picture since crabgrass ain't from the US and is certainally in no threat (well the species I'm thinking of at least).

There's only a couple of reasons why a grass species maybe dying out - certainally Human intenvention could be one, it's only found in one place due to the soil, temperature or other weather conditions & many people have mowed it low - by cutting off the the core of that grass and killing it - or in lots of cases the grass may not like been mowed at all!
If I found such a grass in my lawn (which for the purpose of where I live I've been fortunate of finding a small patch of Wallaby grass), I'd be trying to find out more about that grass - when it grows, flowers and seeds. And collect a small portion of the seed and try and propagate it. Once I've propagated some, I would find a suitable spot for that grass to grow and try and get a colony of that going. I've jumped a little bit there because propagating maybe more complicated than simply collecting the seed and potting it up into trays and watering (certainally for the grasses I've got going they have been straightfoward because they have been successful on their own out in the bush - with the aid of fire or smoke). For propagating I got a suitable book which advises on how to propagate plants and what treatments are available which bring good results. I've also got another list which shows when those species seed (around Christmas time usually). Grass will always generally start growing, produce flowers and eventually those flowers turn to seed - in some cases the seed drops when it's ready so there's a little gap when everything looks ready.

If you were talking about someone elses lawn and you saw something endangered in it - the proper thing to do here is to communicate with that property owner and see if you can get some seed from them. Other services we have here are people which collect local seed stock from particular areas - some services may even carry seed stock for a large area - late last year I visited the botanical gardens in the city which had all these gardens setup from different areas of the state and their theme there was plants which are like you described it - endangered. So it may well be that for your area someone has already come up with that idea of trying to protect endangered plants by collecting the seed and produce and keep seed stock in a well stored area for preservation to protect those species.

CP/M User
January 6th, 2009, 11:56 PM
So anyway I was just wondering how things were looking in Saginaw and did some Googling and found all this stuff!

This appears to be the City of Saginaw website (http://www.saginaw-mi.com/)!
I wonder what they know about the Natural Environment - not much, I did some Advance Googling and anything with Bush in it was simply Clouded over by George Bush!

They have a strict policy on Weeds though (http://www.saginaw-mi.com/Government/Departments/CityClerk/press.php)! :-o Didn't see anything relating to the Natural Environment.

A General Google with Saginaw + "Natural Enviornment" got all this (http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&as_qdr=all&q=%22saginaw%22%2B%22natural+vegetation%22)!

This Book (http://books.google.com/books?id=2Wkz4uSIwM8C&pg=PA53&lpg=PA53&dq=%22saginaw%22%2B%22natural+vegetation%22&source=web&ots=Tyhlj31gJU&sig=CYFd_6RAud7lNZiBw_nEpCSs-bM&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=6&ct=result) which is on Google book looks Interesting - talks about the Wetland of the MidWest! :-D

I'm just suprised that the City of Saginaw don't have more relating to the Natural Environment, perhaps it's more of a Government of Michigan which are involved with that?