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ahm
January 30th, 2009, 03:06 PM
Wow, I am totally blown away by this game Yoomp! for Atari 8-bit.

Watch this and you'll see why:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wDoZu9f0bEs

I'm running it in emulation right now.
But as soon as I get a minute it's going on one of my 800XL systems.

Website (and download) is here: http://yoomp.atari.pl/

Thanks to arkaxow for bringing this game to my attention.

carlsson
January 31st, 2009, 04:00 AM
At first, I believe you needed a 256K expanded Atari to run Yoomp!, which was why I never bothered looking at it. Now it seems they have found compression methods to make it playable within 64K RAM. Or perhaps I'm mixing it up with some recent Atari demo.

pontus
February 1st, 2009, 02:03 AM
It looks pretty sweet. I know very little about atari, could this run on my 1040 STe ?

carlsson
February 1st, 2009, 07:47 AM
No, Yoomp! is a game for 8-bit Atari computers, those with a 6502 processor. Since it requires 64K of RAM, I suppose 800XL, 800XE, 65XE and 130XE are the range of computers. I don't know about the US only 1200XL. Possibly one could have a memory upgraded 400, 800 or 600XL too.

ahm
February 1st, 2009, 09:27 AM
Not surprising, but it plays great on actual 800XL hardware too.
And it loads fast off my hard drive too (MaxIDE cart).

Pontus, why not try it in an emulator?
I'd been running it in Atari800WinPlus up until now.
http://atariarea.krap.pl/PLus/index_us.htm

Cheers,
Andy

carlsson
February 1st, 2009, 02:04 PM
I just downloaded it and run from my SIO2SD, works just well as expected. Perhaps it is a tad bit too much graphical demonstration vs mind-blowing game experience, but definitely something worth seeing and trying.

Raven
March 14th, 2009, 10:03 AM
I realize this is a spectacularly late response to this thread, but anyway..

This really looks more like a lower-res version of something I'd expect to find on a 16-bit system like the Sega Gensis rather than Atari. It's quite impressive for that hardware. Proper proof that with low-level languages and ingenuity, old hardware can do quite a bit.

tezza
March 14th, 2009, 10:27 AM
Proper proof that with low-level languages and ingenuity, old hardware can do quite a bit.

Indeed! It always amazed me what TSR-80 Model 1 programmers used to squeeze into a machine with 16k and extremely limited graphics and sound. Nevertheless they were highly enjoyable.

For example this one at
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Ftkld6W3EI

Tez

Raven
March 14th, 2009, 10:55 AM
I'd imagine it's quite a challenge to get animated Diamonds into a 16K computer game. :D

carlsson
March 14th, 2009, 12:21 PM
I'm not familiar what you mean by Diamonds, but if you think of those Bejeweled games and clones, it has been done well within 1-2K. Even I made a 1K version although with very limited graphics.

Al Hartman
August 18th, 2013, 12:51 PM
Indeed! It always amazed me what TSR-80 Model 1 programmers used to squeeze into a machine with 16k and extremely limited graphics and sound. Nevertheless they were highly enjoyable.

For example this one at
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Ftkld6W3EI

Tez

Most Model I owners had 48k. There wasn't much software for a 16k cassette based unit. Most owners quickly got an Expansion Interface, 32k add-on, and disk drives.

I didn't know anyone who stuck with the base unit for long.

tezza
August 19th, 2013, 03:02 AM
Most Model I owners had 48k. There wasn't much software for a 16k cassette based unit. Most owners quickly got an Expansion Interface, 32k add-on, and disk drives.

Users may have eventually upgraded but I disagree that there was little software for a 16k unit Al. As far as games software goes, there was A LOT for 16k. Just look at any 1980-81 issue of Micro-80. All of the Big Five Stuff...Scott Adams adventures...heaps!. In fact, a lot of the disk games had 16k equivalents (possibly written first) but normally without the high score feature, which was often a data file on the disk.

Tez

Al Hartman
August 19th, 2013, 03:28 AM
It may have been different elsewhere, but in the U.S., EVERYONE I knew with a TRS-80 (I worked for several Radio Shack stores in the early 1980's, and was a member of a user's group in NYC) had a disk system and more than 16k.

This carried onto the Coco, where Spectrum Projects biggest seller was 64k upgrades (I worked for them too.) Disk systems were big sellers. I got a disk controller as soon as I could, and used my disk drives between the two systems until I could afford separate units for each.

Even on the Timex/Sinclair TS-2068, the Zebra Disk System sold out faster than we could get them in from Timex Portugal, followed by the A&J Stringy Floppy.

People really wanted a Spectrum Emulator, the ZX Interface One and Sinclair Microdrives for that system but Timex never got he U.S. version to market and nobody marketed the British version all that well.

Here in the U.S., people really wanted the speed of loading of disk over the slowness of cassette tape.

vwestlife
August 19th, 2013, 04:49 AM
A 16K cassette system was always the base level configuration for the TRS-80 all the way through the Model 4, but that was just to advertise a low price... when people walked into the door to buy one, the friendly Radio Shack salesman would upsell them to a 48K/64K disk system -- and those who couldn't afford it would be steered towards the Color Computer.

Al Hartman
August 19th, 2013, 11:06 AM
I must have been an outlier, because my Radio Shack Store talked me out of the 16k Level 2 unit I wanted, and sold me a 16k Level 1 unit instead. They had one in stock and didn't want to get stuck with it. I was naive and they took advantage of that. Within a month or so, I upgraded to Level 2 because there was little software for a Level 1 unit, and most of the software in the books needed a Level 2 machine.

Once I upgraded, I started saving for an Expansion Interface and more RAM.

vwestlife
August 19th, 2013, 11:27 AM
I didn't even know they sold a 16K Level I Model I. I thought the choice was either 4K Level I or 16K Level II. Did it have the numeric keypad?

However, kinda getting back to the original topic... ;) Atari never officially made a 48K 400, however some were sold "pre-upgraded".

Al Hartman
August 19th, 2013, 06:08 PM
I think in this case, a customer special ordered it and cancelled.

I had an Atari 400 back in the early 80's. It was a 16k unit. I mostly played Star Raiders and K-razy Korral (a Robotron clone) on it.