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Jorg
February 8th, 2005, 11:35 AM
.. but I finally was able to secure a Pentium I 200, non-mmx on ebay, for 3 bucks :)

Now I can finally upgrade my P90 (after I gave up 8 years ago :P)

vic user
February 8th, 2005, 12:43 PM
oh man, do i ever sound like you!

my main internet computer is a pentium 166 running win95, and i am about to upgrade to somewhere around the pentium 300 area, as one of the fellow vintage comp. guys is giving me one for free.

maybe i will find out what all the fuss was about with win98 ;)

chris

carlsson
February 9th, 2005, 02:36 AM
I believe I pretty much maxed out my previous PC, a Socket 7 mobo running a Pentium 200MMX, 64 MB RAM (of which 32MB EDO DIMM) and a 3 GB hard drive. Theoretically I could've stuffed a better graphics card than the 2 MB S3 Virge DX/GX, better sound than the ISA Opti16 and better network than the ISA 3C509B, but all are within its generation specs. Officially the motherboard doesn't support newer CPUs than the one mentioned, and I'm not sure if it would let me play with some jumpers to get beyond that anyway. The computer now partly is stripped from parts, but most of it is left intact if I ever have the need to boot it.

When it comes to upgradable computers, I understand the original configuration is collectable (never mind how old it is - things get older by time). What about maximum official upgrade or maximum possible upgrade, will those kind of machines be worth less than original config?

Exluddite
February 9th, 2005, 08:09 AM
I'd imagine that the upgraded machines (or the components used to upgrade) might appreciate in value or be more "collectable" due to rarity. My logic might be flawed here, but it seems to me that by the time you get the maximum upgrade for your system, there's probably something newer that's available. That being the case, I'd think that fewer components would be produced for the upgrades. I'd back that up with examples, but I can't think of any right now. :D

Unknown_K
February 9th, 2005, 12:12 PM
The only parts that have some value on 286 and newer machines would be the rare addon cards, and parts needed for gaming (sound and video).

A stock pentium will be common for many more years to come

Terry Yager
February 9th, 2005, 02:08 PM
I can't imagine any flavor of Pentium being collectible, now, or in the forseeable future, they're just too common. Possible exceptions might be laptops, which don't age very well, and, of course, the old original 60 MHz Pentium (I call it Pentium 0, since everyone insists on calling the second version "Pentium 1"). Especially collectible would be chips that have the floating-point bug, as very few of them survived the recall.

--T

Anonymous Coward
February 9th, 2005, 11:13 PM
I am also on a 10 year Quest...and it's almost finished. I already have all the major components collected, and I just have a few minor ones left to go. I'm sure several of you in here are already familiar with my EISA 486 project. I'm actually on a quest to build the ultimate 486, but the ultimate 486 turned out to be an EISA machine. When I am finished, I am going to build a webpage dedicated to it...then you guys can shit your pants. I'm using all the tricks in the book to make this thing fly. I hope you will be able to appreciate it, because it's burning a bloody hole in my pocket!!!

Jorg
February 10th, 2005, 08:26 AM
I am also on a 10 year Quest...and it's almost finished. I already have all the major components collected, and I just have a few minor ones left to go. I'm sure several of you in here are already familiar with my EISA 486 project. I'm actually on a quest to build the ultimate 486, but the ultimate 486 turned out to be an EISA machine. When I am finished, I am going to build a webpage dedicated to it...then you guys can shit your pants. I'm using all the tricks in the book to make this thing fly. I hope you will be able to appreciate it, because it's burning a bloody hole in my pocket!!!

Well.. tell us what you need?

Anonymous Coward
February 10th, 2005, 11:29 AM
Actually, I don't think you need to worry about it. Everytime I need a component I post an ad in the wanted section. However, since most of the parts I want are so obscure, nobody ever reponds to them. There are three components I have left to buy which are not critical. They are more of luxury items. I am looking for a Plextor 32X caddy loading drive with a beige bezel, a Seagate Barracuda 36ES2 SCSI drive based on IDE technology, and an NIB Gateway 2000 programmable keyboard manufactured by Maxi-Switch.

joe sixpack
February 11th, 2005, 02:05 AM
I can't imagine any flavor of Pentium being collectible, now, or in the forseeable future, they're just too common. Possible exceptions might be laptops, which don't age very well, and, of course, the old original 60 MHz Pentium (I call it Pentium 0, since everyone insists on calling the second version "Pentium 1"). Especially collectible would be chips that have the floating-point bug, as very few of them survived the recall.

--T

I had a IBM Amber (I think thats what the line was called)
It was a Pentium 60 with the bug. RAN HOT AS HELL.
I gave it to a friend and he chucked it in the trash.
I GAVE HIM ONE NASTY VERBAL BEATING.
Not because it has any value (Because im pretty sure it does not)
But beacause i never ever throw out good hardware.
I find it hard enough trying to throw out bad hardware as you just
never know when you'll need something off it.

Besides who cares if the computers worth money unless thats your only
goal. Myself i like, what i like and what i don't, I don't bother collecting
unless the price is right.

Noth'n wrong with a pen90. They are might sturdy computers
i still use a pen100 for a VPN gateway

Terry Yager
February 11th, 2005, 08:48 AM
The stuff I collect is not necessarily valuable, even though some of it may be kinda rare. (Mostly, I scour eBay and grab up every one-dollar laptop I see. The shipping on one is usually around fifteen buck$ tho, so it's still quite an investment). Some of what I have are machines that have just plain been overlooked by other collectors, so the prices have not been driven through the roof. I try to keep my eye out for "firsts" too, like the first notebook computer (Epson HX-20), first pen-enabled tablet computer (GRiDPad), first "wearable" computer (GRiD PalmPad 2360), or even the first PC-compatible portable to come with an LCD screen (VT Commuter Computer). To me, it's kinda like collecting baseball cards, where the "rookie" cards are the most desirable. If any of this stuff were truly valuable, I would not be able to afford it.

--T

Kaptain Skitzo
February 12th, 2005, 04:09 PM
Any of those $1 laptops work?

Terry Yager
February 12th, 2005, 04:20 PM
Any of those $1 laptops work?

Almost all of 'em...ya never know with eBay, the one that goes for a dollar today might be 100.00 next week.
Last one I bought, $2.25 + 25.00 shipping, still awaiting delivery. (Pentium, 133MHz, 810Mb hdd, 32Mb RAM, needs a power supply.) I don't even bother bidding on the stripped-down, non-functional ones anymore...unless I need a certain one for parts.

--T

Terry Yager
February 12th, 2005, 04:26 PM
Oops, I take that back. Last thing I bought was a Japanese handheld, earlier today:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=5162342207&ssPageName=STRK:MEWN:IT

--T

Terry Yager
February 12th, 2005, 05:14 PM
Here's one...

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=5165082305&fromMakeTrack=true

I'm not bidding on it yet, so if you do, lemme know and I won't bid against you.

Here's another for $5.00 buy--it-now. It's a 486SLC2 @ 50MHz...

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=5164924731&fromMakeTrack=true

(Beware, tho...he's making his money on the shipping -- 28 buck$).

--T

joe sixpack
February 12th, 2005, 05:56 PM
oh god it's a packard HELL!
out of the dozen or so i've seen only
one was'nt broken. i still have one of there crap boards
laying around here. one of the pci chips goes from
room temp -> 150 degrees in about 5 sec's

if your looking for a pretty good / cheap laptop check out
a (acer) TI extensa 5xxx. I got a 560cd model it has all the goodies
of the day. 1.2gb hdd, 40mb mem, swapable floppy / 4x-cdrom, sound & infered
the NI-MH battery was shot but it was easy to recell. BTW it came with
a pen75 however it's just a desktop cpu so yank it out and put a pen100
in it. Wont take anything higher. another cool feature is it has tabs at
the top of the keyboard you can take it out and see the guts in about 2 sec's
with no tools. i got mine for 22.05 total. It's always over looked so you can
win them easy most times.

Terry Yager
February 12th, 2005, 06:13 PM
oh god it's a packard HELL!

Yeah, I know...that's why I didn't bid on it...(that and the inflated shipping).

--T

Terry Yager
February 12th, 2005, 07:49 PM
Then there's this cute lil' sub I just won. It cost a little more than a dollar, but still in the right price range. It's an Ambro (an IBM subsidiary) '486 @ 25MHz.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=5163271318&ssPageName=STRK:MEWA:IT

--T

joe sixpack
February 13th, 2005, 03:19 AM
not a bad little machine for under 20 bucks.

joe sixpack
February 13th, 2005, 04:42 AM
check this out anyone need a math processor? new with box,book
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=3674&item=6742595641&rd=1

also this guy trying to sell a 486dx2 66 as rare?, HA i see that more then anything.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=164&item=6742700128&rd=1

lucky me i had about 30 auctions open in my browser for the last 5 days.
today mozilla decided to ($%itself an crash out.
check out my snap shot of resource useage:
[url]http://www.geocities.com/fcmem/misc/
click madzilla.jpg (147kb)

Jorg
February 13th, 2005, 06:55 AM
[quote="joe sixpack"]

also this guy trying to sell a 486dx2 66 as rare?, HA i see that more then anything.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=164&item=6742700128&rd=1[url]

quote]

Ooo.. I have 5 rare CPUs on stock!

(and a Cyrix 5x86 :P)

Terry Yager
February 13th, 2005, 12:57 PM
I can't imagine any flavor of Pentium being collectible, now, or in the forseeable future, they're just too common. Possible exceptions might be laptops, which don't age very well, and, of course, the old original 60 MHz Pentium (I call it Pentium 0, since everyone insists on calling the second version "Pentium 1"). Especially collectible would be chips that have the floating-point bug, as very few of them survived the recall.

--T

I had a IBM Amber (I think thats what the line was called)
It was a Pentium 60 with the bug. RAN HOT AS HELL.
I gave it to a friend and he chucked it in the trash.
I GAVE HIM ONE NASTY VERBAL BEATING.
Not because it has any value (Because im pretty sure it does not)
But beacause i never ever throw out good hardware.
I find it hard enough trying to throw out bad hardware as you just
never know when you'll need something off it.



Here's one I just kicked up on eBay. Comes in a nice display case, but I dunno if it's worth 75 buck$ or not (we'll see, won't we?)...

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=1247&item=5165353192&rd=1

--T

joe sixpack
February 13th, 2005, 01:53 PM
Here's one I just kicked up on eBay. Comes in a nice display case, but I dunno if it's worth 75 buck$ or not (we'll see, won't we?)...

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=1247&item=5165353192&rd=1

--T

DAMN!,....... i mean... i knew of the recall and everything but i had
no idea it was worth anything. I guess i should have sold it rather
then giving it away, oh well. nice display but i still would'nt give him 75 bucks.

Terry Yager
February 13th, 2005, 02:40 PM
oh god it's a packard HELL!

Yeah, I know...that's why I didn't bid on it...(that and the inflated shipping).

--T

OK, I give up! What's going on here???

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=5163737004&ssPageName=STRK:MEWA:IT

--T

joe sixpack
February 13th, 2005, 02:53 PM
OK, I give up! What's going on here???

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=5163737004&ssPageName=STRK:MEWA:IT
--T

well only thing i can think of is ebay must be popular with crackheads,..
.. Because im sure not going to pay those kinda prices.

i noticed the same thing when i was looking today.

Terry Yager
February 13th, 2005, 03:28 PM
I may be mentally ill, but I ain't that crazy...

--T

Kaptain Skitzo
February 13th, 2005, 04:28 PM
Well, as far as a laptop goes, I'm kinda looking(though not really right NOW, money situations and all) for a laptop that will run a very limited Win98 config(very basic....only really need it to run and store files) for Lotus Word Pro. It's the program I got with an earlier machine(yeah....about 6 years ago) that I prefer to do my writing on. I have a butchered computer up and running with it...but it's a tower, not portable at all. I'd like something I could take to work and use on the fly(when we aren't so busy that I can't jot some stuff down). I figure I can start looking in a month or two.
If anyone can suggest anything, the info would be much appreciated.

joe sixpack
February 13th, 2005, 05:32 PM
if your looking for a pretty good / cheap laptop check out
a (acer) TI extensa 5xxx. I got a 560cd model it has all the goodies
of the day. 1.2gb hdd, 40mb mem, swapable floppy / 4x-cdrom, sound & infered
the NI-MH battery was shot but it was easy to recell. BTW it came with
a pen75 however it's just a desktop cpu so yank it out and put a pen100
in it. Wont take anything higher. another cool feature is it has tabs at
the top of the keyboard you can take it out and see the guts in about 2 sec's
with no tools. i got mine for 22.05 total. It's always over looked so you can
win them easy most times.


T.I / Acer extensa 560cdt
OS: came with win95 (first release, read notes)
floppy / 4x cdrom (swapable)
NI-MH battery
pentium 75mhz (can put a pen100 desktop cpu in)
8 or 16mb (stock, 40mb max)
1.2gb hdd
10.4 lcd
sound w/speakers (on lcd)
touchpad 2 button mouse
infered port
2 - 16bit pcmcia slots (not to confuse with cardbus 32bit)

NOTES: you can take the keyboard out in about 5secs there are slider tabs
at the top that keep the keyboard in place after thats out you can see all the guts
of the system.. very cool. this makes cleaning easy and in my case
it helps if the system is over heating i can just pop up the keyboard and
it cools off quick!
Also the cdrom will not read burnt cds. it might just be mine but it has
a really hard time tracking CD-R(RW)'s. You can adjust the power output
to the lens but it's tricky and takes a lot of time so i've just lived with it.
Reads retail silver cds just fine. I just use a serial cable to transfer anything
i need.
The system plays mp3's fine but you'll need to make some adjustments/tweaks
1. set your player to only play MONO even for stereo files. This will cut cpu usage in
almost half and there is no real advantage to stereo on a laptop.
BTW you might want to use headphones the speakers are crap for music.
2. if the above does not help set the buffer to higher ammount. 3-5secs is good
3. last resort downmix the mp3 or have the player downmix to 22050hz

As far as OS this puppy will run pretty much anything of the day of course im going by
my system not the stock config i have no idea about.
Linux: It's a bitch to get on it but once you do runs just fine however go easy on the X
Win95: eats it up this is a very good fit so is 98 if you have max ram
NT4: runs just fine but i find NT4 to be a better on a desktop I.E: server
as it has no APM support and this is important if you use your laptop on the battery
DOS: Well of course it runs this, it took me a bit to get the card services working but runs like a
champ now, i prefer this for this machine. It will also run
Win3.x but my opinion is your better off saving that 15mb for something more usefull, like DOOM


est ebay price: under 50 USD

my config:
pentium 100 w/passive oversize heatsink (i had to cut a little bit inside the case for the way to big heatsink to fit but looks fine with the keyboard in.)
40mb ram
1.2gb hdd (i have cut in half 600/600)
33.6k pcmcia modem
OS: DOS/LINUX duelboot
Price: 22.05 shipped ebay as-is
Had one hinge cover missing no biggie just plastic cap
also the docking port cover is missing no biggie just plastic flap
the user said that windows said the cd-rom was bad
turns out the drivers got moved and mscdex could'nt load :lol: :lol:

also about the cpu transplant theres a jumper by the cpu, also the socket
is not a ZIF so you'll need to get something to get the cpu out.
i used a tiny flat head screw driver to get a tiny gap all the way around
the cpu, then take a larger screwdriver and go around the cpu again.
do this slowly if you put to much force on one side at a time you might
chip & or damage the cpu. there is a hole in the back of the case to take a very small
fan but im not sure what size. the cpu i put in had a oversize heat sink
so it works well but gets very warm with heavy use. If it gets too too hot
i just pop up open the keyboard and it cools down pretty quick a fan would
fix the problem but i hav'nt a clue as to the size and or where to get one without knowing the size.

EDIT: correction: cd-roms can'd read CD-RW's anyway, I ment CD-R's

Micom 2000
March 16th, 2005, 08:20 PM
Terry. What is the cable socket and voltage for the power supply?
I have a Commodore 386 LT without a power supply and I heard that it takes the same one as the Zeos. The Commodore takes an 8-pin mini-din like a female Mac socket. I've seen Zeos LTs on Ebay before who would also ship to Canada, but was reluctant to buy if it wouldn't work with the Commodore LT, Not trying to beg the Zeos, just wanted affirmation that the ac adaptors did indeed have that socket.

Lawrence


Here's one...

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=5165082305&fromMakeTrack=true

--T

Terry Yager
March 17th, 2005, 02:03 PM
This lil' Zeos is using an 11.5v. 2.5A power supply with a standard (+)-tip, barrel-type jack, size "M" at RadioShack ($1.87 for a blister pack of two). This one is a cute lil' sub, but Zeos also made full-sized notebooks, which probably have different power requirements.

--T

Mad-Mike
March 18th, 2005, 08:01 PM
oh man, do i ever sound like you!

my main internet computer is a pentium 166 running win95, and i am about to upgrade to somewhere around the pentium 300 area, as one of the fellow vintage comp. guys is giving me one for free.

maybe i will find out what all the fuss was about with win98 ;)

chris

Sounds like me too. Just look at below, took me 4 years to push that box that once was a 386 DX-20 up to a Pentium III, and I'm still in search of a "modern" motherboard that can support more than ONE Floppy diskette drive (I want to get my 1.2 MB 5.25" back in). However, you'd never know it was a Micro ATX looking at it 8) I'm sure those that have seen the Uncreative Labs and 386 pages have seen older pics of this one before...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v157/executioner020983/686.jpg

carlsson
March 19th, 2005, 12:18 PM
I'm not sure there are newer motherboards supporting a 5.25" disk at all, being the primary or not. Even the 3.5" are becoming legacy, albeit they still stick around to the industry's big grief.

Cool case mod though.. did you do much work on the rear side to house the backplane of the Micro-ATX board? If I'm not mistaken, EISA-based 486:s had a backplane very similar to ATX, as we used to have a such (EISA) system in a slightly modded ATX case at the computer club. One day when the motherboard had given up, we re-modded it back to house a real ATX board.

Mad-Mike
March 19th, 2005, 01:15 PM
Cool case mod though.. did you do much work on the rear side to house the backplane of the Micro-ATX board? If I'm not mistaken, EISA-based 486:s had a backplane very similar to ATX, as we used to have a such (EISA) system in a slightly modded ATX case at the computer club. One day when the motherboard had given up, we re-modded it back to house a real ATX board.

Not much work had to be done surprisingly. This was at one time a full size AT chassis (it could fit a 1st version IBM PC AT 286 board easily), all I had to do was cut a large hole in back about 3.5" X 10" wide and then slide in the backplane from a damaged Gateway Essential 550C (damaged part of the case was cut off leaving the backplane). The only trickery involved was installing the Micro ATX PSU into the AT PSU case. I used a mixture of clever screw holes, sticky tack, and heat shrink tubing to get the air flow and grounding and all properly installed. I took the original positive action power switch out and put in a "Big Red Button (TM)" from Radio Shack to try and keep the classic 80's look of this machine. The entire back was repainted gloss black, saving the original serial number and GEM logo, and I painted the PSU case gold for an interesting 80's look.

I'm guessing the EISA 486 you speak of was a Deskpro XL series box. I sold one of those on E-bay (built out of 3 non working units), I always thought they would make a rather close mod to ATX given the way the system board was set up.

Anonymous Coward
March 21st, 2005, 10:30 PM
I'll let you in on a little secret. There are converters available that allow you to hook up floppy drives to the SCSI bus. They're pretty interesting.

Mad-Mike
March 22nd, 2005, 09:02 AM
I'll let you in on a little secret. There are converters available that allow you to hook up floppy drives to the SCSI bus. They're pretty interesting.

I'm actually beginning to tinker with that idee, there might be a real benifit if I can boot from any device on the SCSI chain. That might be something I'll look into.

carlsson
March 24th, 2005, 08:07 AM
Hm, I wonder if it would make sense to put a disk drive like 1541 on a SCSI chain - maybe someone has done it already? The CMD hard drive is a SCSI interface but in the other direction (to have a SCSI disk to a C64).

Anonymous Coward
March 24th, 2005, 12:13 PM
The SCSI diskette system works better when using a 32-bit protected mode operating system. You need to keep in mind that the ASPI driver takes up a fair bit of conventional memory. I currently have a converter installed on an 8088 class system, and while it works I think it is a better idea to buy a proprietary controller instead. But, I think for your purpose, the SCSI floppy drive would be perfect. Perhaps a USB controller also exists.

machine
June 2nd, 2005, 06:17 AM
I'm still using a Pentium running at 288 MHz, with a 3 gig disk (wow!). One of my friends has a PC with over 3 gigs of RAM, gee, that's my disk size.

Am I backward or just cheap because I won't spend money on a really serious system?

Terry Yager
June 2nd, 2005, 07:16 AM
Am I backward or just cheap because I won't spend money on a really serious system?

I think I'm a little of both.

--T

Mad-Mike
June 2nd, 2005, 01:27 PM
I'm still using a Pentium running at 288 MHz, with a 3 gig disk (wow!). One of my friends has a PC with over 3 gigs of RAM, gee, that's my disk size.

Am I backward or just cheap because I won't spend money on a really serious system?

Shoot, that thing I made up there (the AT in the picture) is only a Pentium III, and the only reasons for the upgrade were pretty ridiculous, The Sims, and Robot Arena. If not, I'd still have a Pentium 200 MMX with 64MB of EDO RAM. My mom has that with 128 MB of RAM instead of 64 and a 60 GB HDD.

I can't see how anyone under normal circumstances would need more than 15 GB. I've got a 40 GB drive, and I've only managed to use about 10% of it at the most multimedia heavy. I barely even break 3GB of disk space myself per partition. And that's WITH Linux RedHat 9.1 installed & Windows 98 SE.

Sinisterdragon
June 3rd, 2005, 01:31 AM
I do alot of photography and I use up 20Gig of Hdd on my system without a problem. It's the only reason I keep having to upgrade my system all the time... Otherwise I would be more than happy to keep using a Dream 6800....

:twisted:

mryon
June 3rd, 2005, 07:32 AM
I really don't think your reasons are ridiculous at all.
Games have driven plenty of hardware sales and it only seems to be a bigger and bigger seller of hardware the past few years.

So what if you are only moving up into 2000 or 2001 hardware? ;)

What's ridiculous is upgrading hardware just because it's available but I'm preaching to the choir here aren't I? ;)



Shoot, that thing I made up there (the AT in the picture) is only a Pentium III, and the only reasons for the upgrade were pretty ridiculous, The Sims, and Robot Arena. If not, I'd still have a Pentium 200 MMX with 64MB of EDO RAM. My mom has that with 128 MB of RAM instead of 64 and a 60 GB HDD.

Mad-Mike
June 7th, 2005, 02:47 AM
I really don't think your reasons are ridiculous at all.
Games have driven plenty of hardware sales and it only seems to be a bigger and bigger seller of hardware the past few years.

So what if you are only moving up into 2000 or 2001 hardware? ;)

What's ridiculous is upgrading hardware just because it's available but I'm preaching to the choir here aren't I? ;)



Shoot, that thing I made up there (the AT in the picture) is only a Pentium III, and the only reasons for the upgrade were pretty ridiculous, The Sims, and Robot Arena. If not, I'd still have a Pentium 200 MMX with 64MB of EDO RAM. My mom has that with 128 MB of RAM instead of 64 and a 60 GB HDD.


I know, the ridiculous was just put there to ward off those who feed me that "If you want to play games, get an X-Box". I don't fit the mold of a typical gamer though, I'm actually learning how these buggers work by modifying them (changing graphics, messing with the play physics etc.). Outside the 3-D engines of todays new stuff, they are much simpler than something like Monkey Island or Ultima VI that uses an interpreter, and I'm learning how those work too, on the same machine.

I just recently added another computer to my collection off E-bay which is of the same manufacturer as this one, it's turning into my DOS programming and testing machine. It's got an even bigger AT size chassis (it barely fits on the desk next to my 17" monitor). It's a of course, just another GEM, however, it has a 286-10 under the hood, and no I'm not going to cut that one up.

fixamotor61
November 27th, 2005, 04:04 AM
I dont know much about laptops but I have an old PC that would not read cd/r's which I found very annoying BUT only yesterday I cured the problem. I found an update IDE driver for the motherboard and now it reads cd/r fine.

I'm affraid I don't now if you can get an update driver for your laptop but I did notice that there are some drivers still downloadable from ACER's website

http://support.acer-euro.com/drivers/notebook/ext_500.html

vq304
November 27th, 2005, 04:15 AM
I can't imagine any flavor of Pentium being collectible, now, or in the forseeable future, they're just too common. Possible exceptions might be laptops, which don't age very well, and, of course, the old original 60 MHz Pentium (I call it Pentium 0, since everyone insists on calling the second version "Pentium 1"). Especially collectible would be chips that have the floating-point bug, as very few of them survived the recall.

--T

How do you identify a Pentium which has the bug? I seem to recall that "fixed" 386's had a double sigma printed on the CPU, was this the same with Pentium?

Just wondering, because I've got an old Pentium 60 (CPU only, no socket 4 mobo) here.

Vlad
November 27th, 2005, 07:03 AM
I couldn't help but notice the blurb above about 5/25 inch floppy drives. I have a Very modern AMD Athlon 64-bit system running a 200 gig SATA hard drive, about as unvintage as you could get. (I DO have reasons for having a lot of power and HD space) And my BIOS still supports 5/25 inch floppy drives, both 360 and 1.2 MB. I have VIA BIOS and Chipset. The Main Board is Chaintech but I would NEVER buy from them again. The english section of the manual wasin't translated right and it acts really weird if the power is ever turned off (compleatly, like unplugging it.) So Modern BIOS chips SOMETIMES supports the older drives. So far the only ones I know of doing this is VIA. I would recommend VIA, just not Chaintech.

-Vlad

ribbets
November 27th, 2005, 09:12 AM
I can't imagine any flavor of Pentium being collectible, now, or in the forseeable future, they're just too common. Possible exceptions might be laptops, which don't age very well, and, of course, the old original 60 MHz Pentium (I call it Pentium 0, since everyone insists on calling the second version "Pentium 1"). Especially collectible would be chips that have the floating-point bug, as very few of them survived the recall.

--TWould some of the " Other CPU's" Such as IBM,CYRIX Mustangs be considered, keepers, or would you put them in the Pentium class ?.

Terry Yager
November 27th, 2005, 09:43 AM
Well, I guess there are people collecting 'em, so they must be "collectible".

--T

carlsson
November 27th, 2005, 11:18 AM
Cool, Vlad. I'm not skilled enough to tell if the hard part lies in the chipset or the BIOS to support odd devices. Somehow it is possible to address units outside of BIOS calls too? Probably it is a matter of rewriting old code and how much space certain functions take, although FlashBIOS chips seem to contain more and more data.. is it 512K or even 1M these days?

Flack
November 27th, 2005, 01:43 PM
How do you identify a Pentium which has the bug? I seem to recall that "fixed" 386's had a double sigma printed on the CPU, was this the same with Pentium?

Just wondering, because I've got an old Pentium 60 (CPU only, no socket 4 mobo) here.

Via Google:

PENTIUM - One of the most famous and most known bugs is the Pentium FPU flaw / bug discovered by a a mathematician in October 1994. This bug involved the Pentium incorrectly performing floating-point calculations with certain number combinations, with errors anywhere from the third digit on up. This issue does not occur on 120MHz and above Pentium computers however is known to occur on Intel Pentiums 100MHz and below.

Ways of testing your Pentium CPU to determine if it has the Pentium flaw.

Correct Answer
962,306,957,033 / 11,010,046 = 87,402.6282027341

Incorrect Answer
962,306,957,033 / 11,010,046 = 87,399.5805831329

Correct Answer
4,195,835 / 3,145,727 = 1.33382044913624100

Incorrect Answer
4,195,835 / 3,145,727 = 1.33373906890203759

Another way of testing for this flaw is to use Microsoft Excel and enter the following formula:

=4195835-((4195835/3145727)*3145727)

When entering this formula you should receive a returned result of 0.

Chris2005
December 1st, 2005, 01:07 PM
I didn't read the entire thread, rarely do (rarely have the time), but cheap evaluations of Windows 2k are available with certain MSoft publications. Compusa has had them, bought at least 1 on ebay. The keyword is evaluation - you have to reinstall it (and all your apps) after 120 days or thereabouts. You can get them on ebay and probably amazon for about a dollar though plus shipping.