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Great Hierophant
February 24th, 2009, 01:20 PM
I am interested in obtaining a Tandy 1000 TX or a Tandy 1000 TL. Naturally, I will be using this system for gaming, so I am trying to determine the advantages and disadvantages of each. Here is what I came up with:

Tandy TL supports 101 Key Keyboards, Tandy TX's support is iffy for anything other than 90 Key Tandy keyboard. Old software may expect the Tandy keyboard to be used, however.

Tandy TX has composite video support, Tandy TL would need a separate CGA card, but supports Hercules monochrome graphics & text.

Tandy TL has MSDOS in ROM, TX does not.

Tandy TX supports a math coprocessor, TL does not.

Tandy TL supports digitized audio, TX only supports square wave/noise audio.

It would seem that the TL has more advantages than the TX.

Cloudschatze
February 24th, 2009, 03:55 PM
Eh, I'd go with the TL. That said...

- You'll miss out on composite TGA, for which a separate CGA card won't help.

- The PSSJ has a stranglehold on DMA1, which might be an issue if you later install another soundcard, etc.

- Most importantly, if the PSSJ in the TL is similar enough to that of the TL2/RL/RLX/RSX, then the first musical note of KQ2 will ne'er be heard. (I haven't quite figured this one out...)

They both support math co-processors, by-the-way.

Fallo
February 24th, 2009, 04:32 PM
I'd go with the TX, and I've been wanting to get one myself. I would recommend it because of the composite output, and it has both 5.25" and 3.5" drives (TL only has the latter). I wouldn't worry about not having the DAC and 640x200x16 mode because most games with Tandy support use the 320x200x16 mode and 3-voice sound.

The keyboard might be a slight problem because of different scan codes, but you can use drivers that remap the keys. You might have problems with booter games that hook INT 9h and read the keyboard directly.

Cloudschatze
February 24th, 2009, 04:54 PM
I'd go with the TX... it has both 5.25" and 3.5" drives (TL only has the latter).

AFAIK, both the TX and TL came stock with a single, 3.5" (720K) drive. Anything else was either added at the time of purchase, or after-the-fact.

vwestlife
February 24th, 2009, 04:59 PM
Tandy TX has composite video support, Tandy TL would need a separate CGA card, but supports Hercules monochrome graphics & text.
Both Hercules monochrome and Enhanced Tandy CGA are built into the 1000TL (and all members of the RL/SL/TL series). You can press Ctrl-Alt-Shift-V to switch between monochrome and color modes. Both modes use the same monitor output port.

The RL/SL/TL series also features the full 16-color 640x200 graphics mode, as used by DeskMate 3, instead of only 4-color 640x200 graphics in the older 1000s. And the biggest enhancement is the addition of the DAC sound chip with digital audio recording and playback. If you're into graphics and sound, these are the two winning features for the RL/SL/TL series 1000s.

The use of the standard 101-key keyboard layout is a major improvement as well. For every one oddball program that may have been designed for the old 90-key Tandy layout, there are a hundred programs which won't work correctly on the old Tandy layout due to its missing and rearranged keys.

vwestlife
February 24th, 2009, 05:02 PM
Also, somewhere I have a schematic for a simple one-IC circuit which converts RGB video into composite or S-video output, with much better quality than the rather poor composite output on the older Tandy 1000s. I know it appeared in a magazine like Popular Electronics or Electronics Now in the mid-'90s... I just have to go through my stack of issues and find it!

Great Hierophant
February 25th, 2009, 06:57 AM
The use of the standard 101-key keyboard layout is a major improvement as well. For every one oddball program that may have been designed for the old 90-key Tandy layout, there are a hundred programs which won't work correctly on the old Tandy layout due to its missing and rearranged keys.

Actually, scancode wise, the Tandy keyboard corresponds remarkably well to the IBM PC/XT keyboard. They keys may be labeled differently, but for the most part they are in the same or similar places as on the PC/XT keyboard. Only its extra keys may be unrecognized. With that in mind, virtually any program should work with its keyboard if you know what keys it is expecting.


Also, somewhere I have a schematic for a simple one-IC circuit which converts RGB video into composite or S-video output, with much better quality than the rather poor composite output on the older Tandy 1000s.

The composite output of a CGA or Tandy is designed in a particular way to allow for artifact colors. A "better" color converter may make text a little more legible, but it would also worsen the graphics quality of the many games that use the technique.


- Most importantly, if the PSSJ in the TL is similar enough to that of the TL2/RL/RLX/RSX, then the first musical note of KQ2 will ne'er be heard. (I haven't quite figured this one out...)

Did you try that out with both the booter and the DOS versions of KQ2? Its likely that all the Tandy's mentioned use the same chip.


- The PSSJ has a stranglehold on DMA1, which might be an issue if you later install another soundcard, etc. Not good for a Sound Blaster, which only uses DMA 1 until the Pros. However, unless they are being used at the same time, it may not be a big deal.


I wouldn't worry about not having the DAC and 640x200x16 mode because most games with Tandy support use the 320x200x16 mode and 3-voice sound.


A VGA card and a Sound Blaster should be able to handle almost any game that uses either.

shawn510
February 25th, 2009, 08:24 AM
I'd go for the TL or TL/2. My TL/2 has both size floppies and a XT IDE hard drive (that doesn't exactly work yet). You could get those features in a TX, though. But the DAC you can't get in a TX. And I never had an issue with the keyboard on any T1000 games when I ran them on my RLX.

As for video, why composite instead of a CGA monitor? Using a Leading Edge CGA screen from my XT project on my TL2 and it gets the job done. Can you get the 16 color TGA mode on composite? I thought you could not.

barythrin
February 25th, 2009, 08:25 AM
Wow.. I always considered the vintage market to be easier as far as model numbering, etc unlike todays 10 versions of the same thing.. but dang Tandy. I can never keep all the model 1000's straight in my head.

Here's an article as I was googling around for features of the TL http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=940DE1DC163CF931A3575BC0A96E9482 60

shawn510
February 25th, 2009, 09:19 AM
Wow.. I always considered the vintage market to be easier as far as model numbering, etc unlike todays 10 versions of the same thing.. but dang Tandy. I can never keep all the model 1000's straight in my head.

Here's an article as I was googling around for features of the TL http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=940DE1DC163CF931A3575BC0A96E9482 60

It gets even wilder when you look beyond the 1000 series. in the '85 catalog you can count no less than 5 different platforms they were selling at the same time.

1 The PC compatibles, 1000, 2000, 1200HD
2 the 6000/Model II line
3 The Model I/III/IV line
4 The Coco line
5 The Model 100 portable line

And I didn't even count the pocket computers.

vwestlife
February 25th, 2009, 09:20 AM
Wow.. I always considered the vintage market to be easier as far as model numbering, etc unlike todays 10 versions of the same thing.. but dang Tandy. I can never keep all the model 1000's straight in my head.
When in doubt, consult the Tandy 1000 FAQ or the Tech Notes & Jumper manual, both available on TVdog's web site:

http://www.oldskool.org/guides/tvdog/index_html

Fallo
February 25th, 2009, 12:21 PM
I'd go for the TL or TL/2. My TL/2 has both size floppies and a XT IDE hard drive (that doesn't exactly work yet). You could get those features in a TX, though. But the DAC you can't get in a TX. And I never had an issue with the keyboard on any T1000 games when I ran them on my RLX.

The RLX uses an XT-type keyboard, not the 90-key ones. RLXs were weird 8086/286 hybrids. They could use extended memory (only 1 MB, though) but had an 8-bit ISA bus and no IRQs over 7. They also had VGA (not Tandy) graphics.


As for video, why composite instead of a CGA monitor? Using a Leading Edge CGA screen from my XT project on my TL2 and it gets the job done. Can you get the 16 color TGA mode on composite? I thought you could not.

You certainly can use the Tandy modes on a composite display.

shawn510
February 25th, 2009, 01:28 PM
[QUOTE=Fallo;91051]The RLX uses an XT-type keyboard, not the 90-key ones. RLXs were weird 8086/286 hybrids. They could use extended memory (only 1 MB, though) but had an 8-bit ISA bus and no IRQs over 7. They also had VGA (not Tandy) graphics.

I only mention the RLX because that is the one I had after the HX and had no keyboard issues with my games from the HX.
However it didn't have a XT keyboard, but used PS/2 ports for keyboard and mouse. (however the mouse port had compatibilty issues with some programs)

I continued to use the keyboard from the RLX for a while after moving on to 386 and beyond.

vwestlife
February 25th, 2009, 01:31 PM
The RLX uses an XT-type keyboard, not the 90-key ones. RLXs were weird 8086/286 hybrids. They could use extended memory (only 1 MB, though) but had an 8-bit ISA bus and no IRQs over 7.
This was true of the TX and TL series. But the RLX is a full AT-class 80286 machine. Unlike the TX and TLs, it can run Windows 3.1 in 286 Standard mode (with 1 MB RAM on the motherboard). It has an AT-spec PS/2 keyboard port and the full IRQs up to 15. It also has a 1.44MB floppy drive, versus the TX, TL, and TL/2 which only support 720K (and 360K) drives*. The only thing it doesn't have is a 16-bit ISA expansion slot; it only has an 8-bit slot.

* The TL/3 has a high-density floppy controller but only ever came with 720K/360K drives installed.

Cloudschatze
February 25th, 2009, 02:13 PM
* The TL/2 has a high-density floppy controller...

Everything I've read states otherwise. Have you tested this?

vwestlife
February 25th, 2009, 02:45 PM
Everything I've read states otherwise. Have you tested this?
OK, I was off by one revision. I'll try to boil it down, according to the info in the 1000 series Tech Notes & Jumpers manual:

Tandy 1000TL:
* 80286 CPU at 8 MHz (4 MHz in slow mode), with 80287 coprocessor socket
* 640K RAM standard, upgradeable to 768K on motherboard (640K + 128K video memory)
* Video switchable between Enhanced Tandy CGA and Hercules monochrome
* 5 8-bit ISA expansion slots
* IRQs above 7 and Extended Memory not supported
* AT-style DIN keyboard port
* Low-density floppy controller
* 3" 720K floppy drive standard; second 3" 720K drive and/or one 5" 360K drive optional
* Card-edge parallel port; 9-pin serial port
* 2 Tandy/CoCo DIN joystick ports; headphone & microphone/aux input jacks
* MS-DOS 3.3 & DeskMate 3.02 core files in ROM

Updates in the 1000TL/2:
* Built-in IDE-XT "SmartDrive" controller (supports Seagate ST-351A/X and a handful of other hard drives)
* Lost one ISA slot; now only 4
* DeskMate updated to 3.03

Further updates in the 1000TL/3:
* CPU speed increased to 10 MHz (5 MHz in slow mode)
* Floppy controller now supports high-density 1.2/1.44MB drives (but it still only came with a 720K drive as standard)
* PS/2 mouse port added
* Maybe DeskMate updated to 3.04? (unconfirmed)

The TL/3 is by far the rarest. It didn't even appear in any of the full yearly Radio Shack catalogs.

Fallo
February 25th, 2009, 03:21 PM
This was true of the TX and TL series. But the RLX is a full AT-class 80286 machine. Unlike the TX and TLs, it can run Windows 3.1 in 286 Standard mode (with 1 MB RAM on the motherboard). It has an AT-spec PS/2 keyboard port and the full IRQs up to 15. It also has a 1.44MB floppy drive, versus the TX, TL, and TL/2 which only support 720K (and 360K) drives*. The only thing it doesn't have is a 16-bit ISA expansion slot; it only has an 8-bit slot.

Nope, the RLX did only have 8 IRQs (documented in the Tandy 1000 FAQ). It's PS/2 mouse port used IRQ 2 and didn't work with most mouse drivers that expected IRQ 12.

The RLX came with an auto-switching XT/AT keyboard, but used it in XT mode. The RSX was the only of the Tandy 1000 line to use the AT keyboard protocol.

I might add that the RLX was probably not made into a full AT-class machine so it wouldn't steal sales from the 3000 line.

Returning to the original topic, I just remembered that with the TLs, you can disable the onboard floppy controller, printer port, and joysticks. The TX and earlier can't do this. That could be useful if you want to install standard ports.

vwestlife
February 25th, 2009, 04:46 PM
Nope, the RLX did only have 8 IRQs (documented in the Tandy 1000 FAQ). It's PS/2 mouse port used IRQ 2 and didn't work with most mouse drivers that expected IRQ 12.

The RLX came with an auto-switching XT/AT keyboard, but used it in XT mode. The RSX was the only of the Tandy 1000 line to use the AT keyboard protocol.
Apparently the RLX does not have extended IRQs, but it does allow its 286 processor to run in protected mode, unlike all other 1000s with 286s (TX, TL, TL/2, TL/3) which are real-mode only. And TVdog (http://www.oldskool.org/guides/tvdog/RLRLX.html) claims that the RLX uses an AT-type keyboard interface; it was the plain 8086-powered RL that used a PS/2 keyboard port but required an XT-compatible keyboard.


I might add that the RLX was probably not made into a full AT-class machine so it wouldn't steal sales from the 3000 line.
In the early '90s, Tandy offered the 2500 series as the next step above the 1000 series, initially with 286 CPUs and then later 386SXes. These were full AT-class machines with 16-bit ISA slots, high-density floppy and IDE-ATA support, VGA video, Tandy DAC audio, and DOS in ROM in some versions.

Druid6900
February 25th, 2009, 07:56 PM
If you eventually decide on the TX, I have one for sale that has both size drives, a 42MB hard card and a Lava 8-bit VGA card. Even has the keyboard.

Trixter
February 25th, 2009, 11:23 PM
It would seem that the TL has more advantages than the TX.

Unless you have a need for composite video out, the TL is indeed the better system. More speed, DOS in ROM, built-in DAC.

Trixter
February 25th, 2009, 11:32 PM
I've hosted tvdog's information for over a decade now, and I've read the FAQ and wikipedia pages, and I am ashamed to say that I cannot answer this question (maybe someone can help): What is the fastest Tandy that you can put a hard drive into and has built-in composite (RCA) video output?

I ask this because I'm going to be using a Tandy for development for a full week in April, and I was all set to hotrod my TL/2 with a hard drive when I looked at the back of it and found no composite video output. The only other Tandys I have with composite video out are a Tandy EX I have buried somewhere (can't add a hard drive, obviously) and a few Tandy 1000s/1000 HDs (fit the bill, but slow as molasses). So, I'm looking for the "best fit" for my needs (tx? sx? No idea)

The composite video output is a requirement because I need to hook the thing up to a projector. Don't ask :-)

kb2syd
February 26th, 2009, 01:06 AM
If you have a HD controller that will work in a 1000a and the EX has the DMA added in, you can add an HD to an EX.

vwestlife
February 26th, 2009, 04:55 AM
I've hosted tvdog's information for over a decade now, and I've read the FAQ and wikipedia pages, and I am ashamed to say that I cannot answer this question (maybe someone can help): What is the fastest Tandy that you can put a hard drive into and has built-in composite (RCA) video output?
The 1000TX. It's an 8 MHz 80286 (real mode only). All other 1000s with composite out are 4.77 or 7.16 MHz 8088s.

Trixter
February 26th, 2009, 06:04 PM
If you have a HD controller that will work in a 1000a and the EX has the DMA added in, you can add an HD to an EX.

An EX? This thing?

http://www.old-computers.com/MUSEUM/photos/tandy_1000ex_1.jpg

Where would I put the hard drive? And the EXs have a weird slot config, right? I have a speech synthesizer for the EX and it's not an ISA bracket...

Trixter
February 26th, 2009, 06:07 PM
The 1000TX. It's an 8 MHz 80286 (real mode only). All other 1000s with composite out are 4.77 or 7.16 MHz 8088s.

Awesome, that's perfect. Thanks for the info.

vwestlife
February 26th, 2009, 07:32 PM
Where would I put the hard drive? And the EXs have a weird slot config, right? I have a speech synthesizer for the EX and it's not an ISA bracket...
There is no drive bay for an internal hard drive in the EX, but maybe you could hack in a 2" laptop IDE drive somewhere.

And what kind of wacko keyboard layout is that, in that photo? :eek: "M" to the right of "L"... shifted numbers with symbols underneath... various other keys moved around... :confused:

The EX and HX use so-called "PLUS" expansion cards... basically the ISA slot replaced with a pin connector, like an overgrown SCSI connector. Radio Shack offered an adapter to let you use a standard ISA card in an EX/HX, and conversely, also offered an adapter to let you use a "PLUS" card in a normal PC (or other member of the 1000 series) with a standard ISA slot.

Terry Yager
February 26th, 2009, 08:53 PM
And what kind of wacko keyboard layout is that, in that photo? :eek: "M" to the right of "L"... shifted numbers with symbols underneath... various other keys moved around... :confused:


AZERTY= German/European.

--T

kb2syd
February 27th, 2009, 05:05 AM
Where would I put the hard drive? And the EXs have a weird slot config, right? I have a speech synthesizer for the EX and it's not an ISA bracket...

I have posted the directions for creating a standard slot in the HX/EX several times. You need a 62 pin female plug, a 62 pin card edge connector and a few inches of ribbon cable.

Crimp them up, paying attention to pin1 vs pin1. I think they are swapped in the EX/HX series, but the pinouts are available in TVDogs collection of documents.

There is an alternative way here:
ftp://ftp.oldskool.org/pub/tvdog/tandy1000/documents/hx-hd.txt

Then use a standard tandy HD controller and a smallish 2.5" laptop with some double sided foam tape to attach the drive in one of the small cavities inside the EX.

Vint
February 27th, 2009, 08:41 AM
AZERTY= German/European.

--T

Fascinating! Where have I been? I haven't seen the world beyond QWERTY. Oh, I've heard of DVORAK - but anything besides QWERTY was like metric to me. (In the U.S. we just never adopted the metric system.) It do seem strange to us - as does that AZERTY keyboard. I'd never even heard of that! Alas, what a shallow life I lead.
Anyhoo, here are more fascinating keyboard layouts now that the subject has been brought up. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ATOMIK#Chorded_keyboards_and_mobile_devices

Pretty interesting.

tezza
February 27th, 2009, 09:15 AM
- as does that AZERTY keyboard. I'd never even heard of that!

Me neither. Interesting!

Tez

patscc
February 27th, 2009, 09:43 AM
AZERTY is more of a french/belgian thing than anything.
However, they start getting really weird once you get to Cyrillic & Greek, and so on. Check out this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keyboard_layout
patscc

Trixter
February 27th, 2009, 10:45 AM
I have posted the directions for creating a standard slot in the HX/EX several times. You need a 62 pin female plug, a 62 pin card edge connector and a few inches of ribbon cable.

Crimp them up, paying attention to pin1 vs pin1. I think they are swapped in the EX/HX series, but the pinouts are available in TVDogs collection of documents.

There is an alternative way here:
ftp://ftp.oldskool.org/pub/tvdog/tandy1000/documents/hx-hd.txt

Then use a standard tandy HD controller and a smallish 2.5" laptop with some double sided foam tape to attach the drive in one of the small cavities inside the EX.

This is very helpful, thank you. I may look into doing this with my EX (although the best solution for me would be an IDE controller + CF -- I might have to wait for hargle's project)

Terry Yager
February 27th, 2009, 02:36 PM
AZERTY is more of a french/belgian thing than anything.

patscc

I stand correction. I sometimes get confusion when looking over on languages other than England. My apologetics to the French/Belgianlanders.

--T

vwestlife
February 27th, 2009, 08:02 PM
AZERTY is more of a french/belgian thing than anything.
However, they start getting really weird once you get to Cyrillic & Greek, and so on. Check out this:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keyboard_layout
patscc
I've heard of AZERTY, but I didn't realize that in addition to the letters, the numbers and punctuation marks are drastically changed from the QWERTY standard, especially the shifted numbers. The Canadian French layout is not nearly as majorly changed from the U.S. QWERTY layout.

Vint
February 27th, 2009, 09:54 PM
I stand correction. I sometimes get mixed over when looking on languages other than England. My apologetics to the French/Belgianlanders.

--T

They aren't Belgianlanders Ter!
- - here's the real story;

There are different kinds of ethnic people in Belgium.

In general a citizen of Belgium is called - Belgian
More specifically

- People that come from Flanders and speak Flemish as native language are called Flemish
- People that come from Walonia and speak French as native language are called Wallons.
- People that come from German speaking parts of Belgium and speak German as native language are called German speaking Belgians.
- People that come from Brussels and either speak French or Flemish or both as native language are called Brusselois.

33% of Brussels and 11% of Belgium's population is non-Belgians.

source=http://www.outdoorland.info/Belgium/101253.htm

patscc
February 27th, 2009, 10:44 PM
Being a hunt'n'peck type, I try to go with what's in front of me, anyway, and if it's too weird, have a beer & see if goes away.
patscc

Terry Yager
February 28th, 2009, 04:02 AM
They aren't Belgianlanders Ter!

Again, I stand corrective. My apologies to Belgiaums.

--T

Great Hierophant
March 8th, 2009, 10:12 AM
Here are my thoughts on the various features of the Tandy TL:

Enhanced Graphics - Name a game that will use this mode that will also not work with an EGA/VGA adapter. Hercules graphics support is very convenient, but that can also be added with a card.

PSSJ Sound - Alot more games support the Sound Blaster than the digitized output of a PSSJ and you need a Sound Blaster Pro in order to select a DMA channel other than 1. Cloud says that the PSSJ will not give up DMA 1, and I want to use the Sound Blaster 1.x for the Game Blaster chips.

DOS in ROM - Not especially useful if you are using a hard drive, unless the hard drive is drive D. Useless for PC Booters, very useful if you have only have floppy drives.

101-Standard Keyboards - This is a very useful feature indeed. Those 90-key keyboards do not look appealing.

And the Tandy TX features:

Composite Video - This guarantees that you can use a TV for an output device. On the other hand, it may not show the same colors as an IBM CGA.

Cloudschatze
March 8th, 2009, 11:02 AM
PSSJ Sound - Alot more games support the Sound Blaster than the digitized output of a PSSJ and you need a Sound Blaster Pro in order to select a DMA channel other than 1. Cloud says that the PSSJ will not give up DMA 1, and I want to use the Sound Blaster 1.x for the Game Blaster chips.

DMA sharing may, or may not be a problem, depending on the card. I tried a SoundBlaster at DMA1, and it worked fine (although the PSSJ DAC is unusable, as a result), but I couldn't get the PAS to work with the same setting.

Trixter
March 8th, 2009, 01:08 PM
DOS in ROM - Not especially useful if you are using a hard drive, unless the hard drive is drive D. Useless for PC Booters, very useful if you have only have floppy drives.


My opinion of this feature changed 180 degrees when I got a TL/2 a few years ago. It is simply the coolest thing since sliced bread -- it's like getting the "undo" feature of a multitasker. Program frozen? Pop the red button and you have an A: prompt in less than two seconds. Don't like the game you're running and can't figure out the quit command? Pop the button, POOF you're back at the DOS prompt. It's really useful.

jrf
March 15th, 2009, 05:29 AM
I have a TL2 if anyone's interested.

Fallo
March 15th, 2009, 10:42 AM
Here are my thoughts on the various features of the Tandy TL:

Enhanced Graphics - Name a game that will use this mode that will also not work with an EGA/VGA adapter. Hercules graphics support is very convenient, but that can also be added with a card.

The 640x200x16 mode was not BIOS-supported and you had to program the registers directly to use it. This contributed to it's unpopularity, and also because using it would exclude people who had TXs and earlier and did not have this mode.


PSSJ Sound - Alot more games support the Sound Blaster than the digitized output of a PSSJ and you need a Sound Blaster Pro in order to select a DMA channel other than 1. Cloud says that the PSSJ will not give up DMA 1, and I want to use the Sound Blaster 1.x for the Game Blaster chips.

DOS in ROM - Not especially useful if you are using a hard drive, unless the hard drive is drive D. Useless for PC Booters, very useful if you have only have floppy drives.

I think that the ROM DOS had a command that would let you boot from either floppy, or at least on the HX it did. Sort of handy.


101-Standard Keyboards - This is a very useful feature indeed. Those 90-key keyboards do not look appealing.

It's only some keys (particularly the numeric keypad) that have different scan codes and cause trouble. I think that booter games would pose the biggest problem with this.


And the Tandy TX features:

Composite Video - This guarantees that you can use a TV for an output device. On the other hand, it may not show the same colors as an IBM CGA.

This apparently only affects colors other than white. A game like Ms. Pac-Man that uses the 640x200 composite mode (which has artifacting mixed with white) would look the same on a Tandy and an IBM CGA card. Games that use the 320x200 composite mode (like Archon) might look different because you're mixing colors with the artifacting.

And as I've mentioned, the onboard floppy, printer port, and joysticks can be disabled on the TL.

Cloudschatze
March 15th, 2009, 11:55 AM
And as I've mentioned, the...joysticks can be disabled on the TL.

How is this accomplished?

Fallo
March 15th, 2009, 01:23 PM
How is this accomplished?

I don't know exactly, but someone here mentioned the TL having a setup program, which may have an option to disable it.

Great Hierophant
March 15th, 2009, 04:26 PM
None of the TL manuals give a setting to disable on-board peripherals in their setup programs.

Fallo
March 15th, 2009, 05:30 PM
None of the TL manuals give a setting to disable on-board peripherals in their setup programs.

Ok, I found it. Bit 1 of port FFEBh disables the joystick ports on the TL.

Cloudschatze
March 15th, 2009, 08:43 PM
None of the TL manuals give a setting to disable on-board peripherals in their setup programs.

You have to use the super-secret, "/a" switch. Even so, Tandy didn't provide any option in the setup utilities to disable the joysticks...


Ok, I found it. Bit 1 of port FFEBh disables the joystick ports on the TL.

... Which makes this interesting. (Thanks, Fallo!)

I'll have to give this a shot. According to the same section in the TL technical manual, it ought to be possible to disable the "sound chip" as well...

Great Hierophant
March 16th, 2009, 05:28 PM
Ok, I found it. Bit 1 of port FFEBh disables the joystick ports on the TL.

Bit 2 disables the sound chip.

jrf
May 3rd, 2009, 06:26 PM
I have a TL2 if anyone's interested.

I also have Deskmate for it.

Mike Chambers
May 6th, 2009, 01:01 AM
i'm a bit late to this thread. i have a 1000TX (and an HX) which i've found to be excellent for old-school gaming. luckily i got mine with a 20 MB IDE hard drive, which made it that much better. between the TX and TL it's basically a choose em based on your personal prefs i guess, but i'll tell you that it's very cool to be able to carry it over to the TV now and then for a bit of marble madness or ultima 6 on a bigger screen.

one major advantage of the TX is being able to output the tandy enhanced graphics modes to a TV, can't do that with the TL i believe.

Great Hierophant
May 6th, 2009, 07:13 PM
i'm a bit late to this thread. i have a 1000TX (and an HX) which i've found to be excellent for old-school gaming. luckily i got mine with a 20 MB IDE hard drive, which made it that much better. between the TX and TL it's basically a choose em based on your personal prefs i guess, but i'll tell you that it's very cool to be able to carry it over to the TV now and then for a bit of marble madness or ultima 6 on a bigger screen.

one major advantage of the TX is being able to output the tandy enhanced graphics modes to a TV, can't do that with the TL i believe.

Being able to see 320x200x16 screens on a big TV is important to me, and more to the point, it preserves the composite color capabilities of many games. With a TL I would have to stick a CGA card for any composite color, and then only CGA composite color.

The TL is a much more flexible machine, virtually all of it can be disabled. You can put in a high density floppy controller, a standard gameport, a bidirectional or better parallel card that would be LPT1.

Fallo
May 6th, 2009, 09:30 PM
Being able to see 320x200x16 screens on a big TV is important to me, and more to the point, it preserves the composite color capabilities of many games. With a TL I would have to stick a CGA card for any composite color, and then only CGA composite color.

Of course, you'll still want a RGB monitor because of the futility of trying to use 80-column text on TVs.

Remember though that the Tandy video doesn't use the OSC line on the bus, and so you'll get composite colors that are very different from those of CGA.


The TL is a much more flexible machine, virtually all of it can be disabled. You can put in a high density floppy controller, a standard gameport, a bidirectional or better parallel card that would be LPT1.

...and it uses a standard XT keyboard as opposed to the 90-key ones. It's also got the 640x200x16 graphics mode and DAC, although hardly anything supports them.