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View Full Version : Biggest Floppy In Existance - and where can I get one?



Raven
March 26th, 2009, 09:38 PM
What's the biggest floppy (physical size)? I thought it was 8", but I just heard mention of a 14" in a thread around here... Whatever size it is, I'd like to have some (and hopefully a drive to use them in!). I love floppy disks, and magnetic media for that matter. Lovely noises, full read/write (stupid optical garbage...) and much sturdier in general than their newer cousins.

While I'm on the subject, what's the biggest logical sized floppy? The ZIP-250? Is there bigger?

Chuck(G)
March 26th, 2009, 11:00 PM
While I'm on the subject, what's the biggest logical sized floppy? The ZIP-250? Is there bigger?

Are you counting a ZIP drive as a real floppy? Unlike a real floppy, the head doesn't contact the media, so it's sort of a mongrel. I'd class the LS-240 as the largest-capacity true floppy.

Someone once showed me an RCA CED (Selectavision) video disk and tried to tell me it was a big (12") floppy (It does kind of resemble one).

Trooper
March 27th, 2009, 02:31 AM
I suspect that what Raven is asking about is the physically largest floppies, not the ones with the highest capacity.

barythrin
March 27th, 2009, 07:50 AM
I could certainly be wrong but the largest "floppy disk" I've ever heard of is the 8" which I recall being the first. Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floppy_disk confirms that but as any end-user written document could be incorrect.

If you consider a floppy just another magnetic media format then prior to that you could have reel/tape systems and could end up with 12-14" or early hard drives had very large (also 12-14" platters).. some had removable platters almost like a disk drive or cartridge based system.

8" drives and disks can be tricky. You'd need an adapter (or build one) to connect it to a 5.25" system unless you have/find a system that can take 8" drives. feebay of course will have some people selling them and the disks, but you could certainly check this sites auction area or just the for sale area here and once and a while someone will post them. Make sure you know if you need softsectored floppies though, some have a hold in them and are hard sectored, in those cases you'd need the same drive or a hard sectored floppy drive to use the disks. (Long story but it was used to detect the spinning and sector it was on since the motors weren't that reliable to spin at a predictable rate).

- John

cosam
March 27th, 2009, 07:59 AM
What's the biggest floppy (physical size)?

About 107 feet (http://www.swtpc.com/mholley/Creative_Computing/Large_Disk.htm).

frozenfire75i
March 27th, 2009, 08:04 AM
Holly Crap, I wonder what ever happened to that project?



About 107 feet (http://www.swtpc.com/mholley/Creative_Computing/Large_Disk.htm).

ahm
March 27th, 2009, 08:16 AM
Holly Crap, I wonder what ever happened to that project?
April fool!

Seriously, look at that photo. It's the hold of a cable-laying ship, probably one of AT&T's.
The text doesn't really make much sense, does it?

And finally, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creative_Computing:
"The April, 1980 issue of Creative Computing contained clever parodies of all of the major computer magazines of the time."

barythrin
March 27th, 2009, 08:23 AM
lol, what timezone are you in Ahm? You're a few days ahead of us in CDT. So.. what's the seek time of that floppy? ;-)

Raven
March 27th, 2009, 08:46 AM
I was asking both capacity AND physical size, and I personally class a disk as a floppy when the disassembled magnetic media itself is floppy and in a disk-shape, i.e., not a cassette, not a HDD, but yes to ZIP.

Chuck(G)
March 27th, 2009, 08:55 AM
I suspect that what Raven is asking about is the physically largest floppies, not the ones with the highest capacity.

He asked about both physical and logical sizes.

8" is the largest digital floppy I've ever seen. However, the floppy wasn't a new idea in 1969. Timex used a flexible oxide-coated disc in its 1954 Timex Magnetic Disc Recorder (http://ftldesign.com/Timex/). The discs could even be folded and mailed.

Even the Timex gizmo wasn't new. The Thermionic Recordon (http://www.brenelltape.co.uk/id8.html) dates from 1948 and used a 9 inch floppy. Unlike the Timex unit, however, the substrate of the discs was paper, not plastic. But they did have an index hole...

Nihil sub sole novum...

carlsson
March 27th, 2009, 09:18 AM
Once upon a time a guy borrowed some 5.25" floppies from me. He also thought they could be folded. :-( Fortunately I managed to rescue most of the content when I got it back.

Terry Yager
March 27th, 2009, 10:12 PM
Heh! My brother once used a magnetic-mount CB antenna as a paperweight to keep a stack of disks from blowing off his desk. Wiped about a dozen or so.

--T

Terry Yager
March 27th, 2009, 10:15 PM
So what would happen if they did create a spinning disk whose speed exceeded the speed of light? Would it just cease to exist in this time/space? Would the data appear on it before it had been written? Would ya just get "Track zero error, disk unusable," or what? Whaddaya think?

--T

Chuck(G)
March 27th, 2009, 10:33 PM
So what would happen if they did create a spinning disk whose speed exceeded the speed of light? Would it just cease to exist in this time/space? Would the data appear on it before it had been written? Would ya just get "Track zero error, disk unusable," or what? Whaddaya think?

I would have thought the answer would be obvious.

You'd get negative access times--the data would be on the disk before you wrote it.

Suppose you intended to run a program that wrote a certain bit of data on the disk, but the power suddenly failed before you could write it. Would the data still be on the disk? Would this upset the time-space continuum?

Raven
March 29th, 2009, 12:51 PM
We shall call them paradox floppies, and they will be 6.66" just for superstition's sake. :D

Echoes
March 29th, 2009, 01:47 PM
I think I actually saw them on ebay, along with this ipod (http://guides.macrumors.com/images/a/af/Videoipodfake_3.jpg) and this version of Windows (http://tecnoblog.girlpower.it/wp-content/uploads/2007/10/windows_vista_vinyl_edition.jpg) :mrgreen:

chuckcmagee
March 29th, 2009, 08:54 PM
I have one of those magnetic mounts I was going to use for EVDO (new kind of internet access). I keep it " magnetically shorted " by leaving it on top of a steel cabinet. Turns out there is NOT EVDO out here in the boonies yet. I should trash the mount. Too easy to do what you said " use it as a weight to keep diskettes from blowing away ", which I have stacks of, everywhere you look.

Terry Yager
March 30th, 2009, 08:56 PM
Much simpler to just nail em to the desk...

--T