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View Full Version : A 144 (no decimal!) MB floppy!?!?



TandyMan100
April 15th, 2009, 08:41 AM
http://www.surpluscomputers.com/347711/house-brand-caleb-it-144mb.html



WHAT



THE


F*****?!?!?!?


Does anyone know anything about this thing?

Erik
April 15th, 2009, 08:46 AM
You mean the typo? :D

snq
April 15th, 2009, 09:20 AM
I don't know anything about these things, but I came across some other high capacity floppy-looking things that I'd never heard of before.

3M, 128MB.. 3.5'' rewritable optical disk.
http://www.radeonx.com/dump/3Mmo128MB.jpg

Iomega/Bernoulli 150 MB. Apparenly first released in 1983 (with less capacity, still 20 MB though) and the predecessor of the zip drive.
http://www.radeonx.com/dump/Bernoulli150.jpg

TandyMan100
April 15th, 2009, 10:11 AM
@snq:

Those are cool! Unusual looking. Where did you find those?

barythrin
April 15th, 2009, 10:18 AM
Interesting, yeah I guess that's another take on the super drive thing (LS-120). http://news.cnet.com/Caleb-announces-144MB-floppy/2100-1001_3-204326.html. Great price though cept having a floppy drive/disk that you can't read anywhere else lol. Well, and it takes an EIDE port which is why I never got interested in them.

kb2syd
April 15th, 2009, 10:24 AM
I have a tendancy to forget how young some members are. They didn't live through the weird storage formats most of us in the micro world did.
Tape,
8" floppy,
Hard secotored floppies,
Single Sided floppies,
2" floppies,
Bubble Memory,
Cauzin soft strips,
The 10 meg bernoulli drives,
Syquest,
Jazz,
LS-120,
Floptical,
magneto-optical...

what else am I missing?

linuxlove
April 15th, 2009, 11:01 AM
I have a tendancy to forget how young some members are. They didn't live through the weird storage formats most of us in the micro world did.
Tape,
8" floppy,
Hard secotored floppies,
Single Sided floppies,
2" floppies,
Bubble Memory,
Cauzin soft strips,
The 10 meg bernoulli drives,
Syquest,
Jazz,
LS-120,
Floptical,
magneto-optical...

what else am I missing?

yes, well I'm 13, yet i love vintage computers and while i might not remember some of the old medium standards, i'm finding out about them due to this wonderful thing called The Internet.

kb2syd
April 15th, 2009, 11:05 AM
Wasn't being critical. Just listing some that the less aged might want to ask google about.

snq
April 15th, 2009, 11:08 AM
@snq:

Those are cool! Unusual looking. Where did you find those?
I didn't actually buy them so they're not mine, but I came across them in a Swedish store that has a lot of used computer parts.

As for the age thing, I'm 30 and the oldest media I've used in my youth must've been C64 tapes. When it comes to PC, 8'' floppies probably weren't being used any more by the time I was born but I've gone through a whole lot of 5.25'' floppies, DD 3.5'' with drilled HD holes (DD was a lot cheaper...), and I was the first one in college to own a 100 MB parallel port zip drive :)

Chuck(G)
April 15th, 2009, 11:10 AM
I have a tendancy to forget how young some members are. They didn't live through the weird storage formats most of us in the micro world did.
Tape,
8" floppy,
Hard secotored floppies,
Single Sided floppies,
2" floppies,
Bubble Memory,
Cauzin soft strips,
The 10 meg bernoulli drives,
Syquest,
Jazz,
LS-120,
Floptical,
magneto-optical...

what else am I missing?

Kodak/Drivetec drives (3...6MB 5.25" floppies),3.25" floppies, 3" floppies, 2" floppies, Exatron Stringy Floppies...

kb2syd
April 15th, 2009, 11:30 AM
DS/QD 5.25" floppies (720K on 5.25").

NobodyIsHere
April 15th, 2009, 11:35 AM
DS/QD 5.25" floppies (720K on 5.25").

My personal favorite. Use a TEAC FD55GFR in DSQD mode and that is one nice floppy drive system. Too bad the PC world never adopted it.

Wavemate Bullet and the Heath/Zenith Z-90 used a similar format.

http://repc.stores.yahoo.net/514floppydrive.html

Thanks and have a nice day!

Andrew Lynch

Chuck(G)
April 15th, 2009, 11:37 AM
FWIW, while these (particularly with 2 disks included) seem to be a great deal, their history of working with XP and later is very spotty. I never could get one to work on my XP systems--though they seem to work fine on 2K.

BuggZ
April 15th, 2009, 01:06 PM
Not necessarily vintage, but how about the iomega "Click" disks. 40Meg on a removable disk less than 2" square. Argus even made a digital camera that used the disks, but in the end it was just another format that didn't catch on.

arjoll
April 15th, 2009, 01:11 PM
what else am I missing?
There's always Sinclair Microdrives :)

Also the Digicart/II analogue cartridge replacement for broadcasters used (from memory) 120MB 5.25" Iomega disks.


DS/QD 5.25" floppies (720K on 5.25").
SS 100tpi Teac FD-50C-11 drives (see hardware thread) running 330k - pity they didn't go double sided!

TandyMan100
April 15th, 2009, 02:18 PM
yes, well I'm 13, yet i love vintage computers and while i might not remember some of the old medium standards, i'm finding out about them due to this wonderful thing called The Internet.
That makes two of us ;-)

Chuck(G)
April 15th, 2009, 03:58 PM
Iomega/Bernoulli 150 MB. Apparenly first released in 1983 (with less capacity, still 20 MB though) and the predecessor of the zip drive.

Well yes and no. The first Bernoullis were 5 MB and use a different technology than the Zip drives. The Bernoulli boxes were called that because they utilized Bernoulli's Principle (http://www.nasm.si.edu/exhibitions/gal109/LESSONS/TEXT/TEASERS.HTM). The Zip and Jaz are more conventional in implementation.

How about the 2.8" DataDisk (http://www.fileformat.info/media/2.8-floppy/)? Used a spiral track to record about 60K...

Yzzerdd
April 15th, 2009, 06:28 PM
That makes two of us ;-)

Really? I didn't know there were people on here younger than me. Or maybe I did but forgot. I started on here when I was 14, but started interest(and even bought a system) at 13. I'm 16 now, headed to 17 in May. Wow. I love how on the forums our age doesn't matter. Just a bunch of computer geeks together talking about our hobby and lending a hand.

--Ryan

Anonymous Freak
April 15th, 2009, 06:35 PM
I used some 230 MB Magneto-Optical disks as a primary storage device on some of my older Macs for quite some time. Still have three drives (two external, one internal,) and about a dozen disks. They are the same footprint as a 3.5" floppy, only thicker. The fun thing was to mount them inside a Mac where the floppy drive should go.

Not to mention LS-120 and LS-240 drives. The LS-240 had a fun feature: You could format a stock 1440 KB floppy disk (They are *NOT* "1.44 MB") to 32 MB.

I also like the "2M" utility, which can cram just shy of 4000 KB onto a "2880 KB" ED floppy disk. (I have a slimmed down install of Windows 3.0 on one floppy.)

Terry Yager
April 15th, 2009, 10:48 PM
Bubble memory?

--T

TandyMan100
April 16th, 2009, 03:52 AM
Really? I didn't know there were people on here younger than me. Or maybe I did but forgot. I started on here when I was 14, but started interest(and even bought a system) at 13. I'm 16 now, headed to 17 in May. Wow. I love how on the forums our age doesn't matter. Just a bunch of computer geeks together talking about our hobby and lending a hand.

--Ryan
On the internet itself age doesn't matter. However. I kind of like being the youngest here. I can get away with more! :chainsaw: :jumping6:

Vlad
April 16th, 2009, 04:41 AM
Bubble memory?

--T

I still have a tape reel that formats that! :mrgreen:

kb2syd
April 16th, 2009, 04:51 AM
Bubble memory?
I listed bubble memory, or do you not rememer bubble memory? When it came out everyone was gaga about how it would revolutionize storage.

Never amounted to much.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubble_memory

Other than Cauzin, weren't there other weird on paper formats?

Can't believe I forgot the classic:

Paper Tape

Not to mention all the different tape formats that have come and gone for backup purposes.

TandyMan100
April 16th, 2009, 05:44 AM
I listed bubble memory, or do you not rememer bubble memory? When it came out everyone was gaga about how it would revolutionize storage.




Bubble memory is ghetto. You can build it yourself. I've seen little plastic bottles full of the little magnetic cores that you would spend hours stringing on to little wires and soldering them to the circuit board. Then you cross your fingers and prepare for the smoke tes-- :boom:

Druid6900
April 16th, 2009, 05:55 AM
VCRs as mass storage devices.

Erik
April 16th, 2009, 05:56 AM
Bubble memory is ghetto. You can build it yourself. I've seen little plastic bottles full of the little magnetic cores that you would spend hours stringing on to little wires and soldering them to the circuit board. Then you cross your fingers and prepare for the smoke tes-- :boom:
That's core memory. Bubble memory is solid state. Kind-of a variation on the EPROM.

kb2syd
April 16th, 2009, 05:57 AM
Bubble memory is ghetto. You can build it yourself. I've seen little plastic bottles full of the little magnetic cores that you would spend hours stringing on to little wires and soldering them to the circuit board.

Are you thinking of CORE memory. I don't think bubble memory works this way. Bubble memory uses a pattern of magnetic bars imprinted on the surface of garnet.

Not something I'm likely to try.

TandyMan100
April 16th, 2009, 07:11 AM
Whoops :whoops: ! I got confused. Core memory is ghetto, then.


VCRs as mass storage devices? Could work. Anyone ever tried that?

Chuck(G)
April 16th, 2009, 09:13 AM
Whoops :whoops: ! I got confused. Core memory is ghetto, then.


VCRs as mass storage devices? Could work. Anyone ever tried that?

It was, as a backup medium. I used one with a VHS VCR at one time, but it was slow--and of course, didn't do verify-with-write, so it had to incorporate quite a bit of redundancy.

Delay line memory--mercury and magnetostrictive. Williams tubes. Thin-film. Capacitive and core-rope ROM.

I think this is what Grady Booch calls "tribal memory".

Vint
April 16th, 2009, 06:29 PM
Of the large size floppies, (not dimensional but storage space), I remember the LS120. I bought one of those crappy drives at Best Buy at a premium price back in the 90's, and the 120 meg floppies were expensive as well. (I think around $10. each, as I recall and the drive was like $190. or so. Yikes! But it seemed to be the way to go, at the time. I needed more and more storage space. Well, the LS120, at least in my situation, was more than slow - it dragged on and on. It took forever to get even a directory off the floppy. I learned to really dislike the thing. But I got myself locked into the system by purchasing so many disks that I couldn't get out. I had too much invested in the blasted things.
Anyway, here's an old Cyrix powered 133 Mhz machine with my LS120 (it's the whiter looking drive toward the center). It appears just like a standard 1.44 M floppy, and it will even work as a standard 1.44 M floppy drive, but it's specialty was the 120 M floppies.
http://www.vintage-computer.com/vcforum/picture.php?albumid=14&pictureid=287
Here's a 120 meg floppy for it. I saved about a half dozen of these things for posterity. They work also as a 1.44 meg floppy. A tad wasteful, - kind of like having a silver plated floppy :)
http://www.vintage-computer.com/vcforum/picture.php?albumid=14&pictureid=288

Anonymous Freak
April 16th, 2009, 07:33 PM
Of the large size floppies, (not dimensional but storage space), I remember the LS120.

They work also as a 1.44 meg floppy. A tad wasteful, - kind of like having a silver plated floppy :)

I use a USB LS-120 drive as my primary floppy drive on my OS X Mac. I don't need it often; but when I do, it's useful. Not as sleek as the newer slimline USB bus-powered floppy drives, but I get the bonus of 120 MB of storage if I really need it to transfer to my non-Internet-connected network. (My server is an older Intel-branded one that came with an LS-120 as its standard floppy drive.

Chuck(G)
April 16th, 2009, 09:11 PM
The LS120 does spin a standard 1.44M (sic) floppy much faster than a standard legacy drive, so it it does have an advantage (at least for the IDE versions). It won't do "funny" formats, such as you'd find on CP/M systems, but it will read (but not format) PC98 "DOS-V" diskettes, just like most USB floppy drives.

Anyone tried an IDE LS240 on Windows XP or Vista?

NeXT
April 16th, 2009, 10:36 PM
The LS120 does spin a standard 1.44M (sic) floppy much faster than a standard legacy drive, so it it does have an advantage (at least for the IDE versions). It won't do "funny" formats, such as you'd find on CP/M systems, but it will read (but not format) PC98 "DOS-V" diskettes, just like most USB floppy drives.

Anyone tried an IDE LS240 on Windows XP or Vista?

I used an IDE LS120 drive in an XP box but it was for reading a bunch of floppies but it felt a lot faster as opposed to a regular floppy drive.
I tried booting the NeXTSTEP installation and driver floppies and it took a quarter of the time it normally took me.

TandyMan100
April 17th, 2009, 03:49 AM
Of the large size floppies, (not dimensional but storage space), I remember the LS120. I bought one of those crappy drives at Best Buy at a premium price back in the 90's, and the 120 meg floppies were expensive as well. (I think around $10. each, as I recall and the drive was like $190. or so. Yikes! But it seemed to be the way to go, at the time. I needed more and more storage space. Well, the LS120, at least in my situation, was more than slow - it dragged on and on. It took forever to get even a directory off the floppy. I learned to really dislike the thing. But I got myself locked into the system by purchasing so many disks that I couldn't get out. I had too much invested in the blasted things.
Anyway, here's an old Cyrix powered 133 Mhz machine with my LS120 (it's the whiter looking drive toward the center). It appears just like a standard 1.44 M floppy, and it will even work as a standard 1.44 M floppy drive, but it's specialty was the 120 M floppies.
http://www.vintage-computer.com/vcforum/picture.php?albumid=14&pictureid=287
Here's a 120 meg floppy for it. I saved about a half dozen of these things for posterity. They work also as a 1.44 meg floppy. A tad wasteful, - kind of like having a silver plated floppy :)
http://www.vintage-computer.com/vcforum/picture.php?albumid=14&pictureid=288
But they look cool! Interesting stuff

tingo
September 3rd, 2009, 11:33 AM
VCRs as mass storage devices.

Yes. And do anyone remember video-8 tape drives?

Chuck(G)
September 3rd, 2009, 11:54 AM
My first mass storage that I owned was a Techtran dual-cassette drive. Meant to take the place of paper tape, was RS232C and could go to 2400 bps and do tape searches and offline tape-to-tape copy. It used what amounts to audio cassettes.

Anybody forget mag card? NCR CRAM, IBM Mag card typewriters. IBM Photostore (the one I knew was at Lawrence Livermore). Not to mention Data cell drives and that peculiar IBM mag tape-in-a-beercan stored in a pigeon coop thingie (the model number escapes me). Dynamic shift registers, magnetostrictive delay, acoustic delay memories? EBAM? SCROLL?

Bubble memory generated a bit of a buzz, but it was short-lived after it was obvious that (a) controlling the beast wasn't simple (b) it was a circulating memory so random access wasn't blazingly fast (c) it was power-hungry and (c) it was expensive.

The military types liked it for its ruggedness. But there's no accounting for taste.

olePigeon
September 3rd, 2009, 12:37 PM
Did someone mention cassette tape?

Also, when I was volunteering at a computer workshop we got to beta test a lot of hardware and software. One piece of software I wish I still had was Adobe Photoshop 3 for BeOS.

However, one piece of beta hardware we had was a floppy drive that had 10MB floppies. It could read/write normal 1440 KB floppies as well. We had it hooked up to an old Mac Quadra.

My dad worked with an IBM hard drive when he was working at ROLM. It was the size of a cloths washer. Had 6 platters on a giant drum that you'd load into the carrier. They used it to transfer programs from their punch card compiler/computer.

He still has a few programs on cards and one on paper tape. :)

I used to joke that the first computer virus was a couple of grad students and a trip wire.

NeXT
September 3rd, 2009, 04:52 PM
I still use magneto optical storage.
I got a 650mb SMO-S501 MO drive with a single double sided cartridge I use for backing up one of my SGI systems and another smaller 128mb drive I use to store stuff on my pc or mac.

Bobthearch
September 3rd, 2009, 06:24 PM
Also, when I was volunteering at a computer workshop we got to beta test a lot of hardware and software. One piece of software I wish I still had was Adobe Photoshop 3 for BeOS.

That would be freakin' sweet. I love BeOS - have it currently installed on a PIII Dell, and am in the process of installing / dual-booting BeOS PPC on a Power Computing clone (not as easy as it sounds, especially considering that BeOS was originally intended to be Mac-Centric).

I have something that I've never seen before, a dual Bernoulli drive. Made by Iomega and in the same style case as an IBM 5150, which is a clue to it's age. Don't have any disks for it, but I doubt it works.