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VintageComputerman
April 19th, 2009, 06:03 PM
I got wind of a person in my town that heard of my vintage computer collecting. I haven't talked to the guy yet, but from what my brother told me, this guy has some real old IBM disk changer that takes disks from several shelves and places them into a drive or reading device of some sort. It is supposed to be one unit like a cabinet with a glass door and it supposedly works.

He wants to sell it on ebay, from what I gather.

Anyone got any links to what I described? I think I have a good idea what it might be. I envision the cabinet is blue and black but will know more later in the month. Just curious and would like comments.

I'm not sure if it's disk or tape.

hexsane
April 19th, 2009, 06:23 PM
Its most likely an optical jukebox. I've had a few HP jukeboxes. Not familiar with IBM models though.

Chuck(G)
April 19th, 2009, 07:24 PM
If it was an IBM 3850 (http://www.columbia.edu/acis/history/mss.html), it's probably worth a small fortune. Do any still exist?

Unknown_K
April 19th, 2009, 08:46 PM
If it was an IBM 3850 (http://www.columbia.edu/acis/history/mss.html), it's probably worth a small fortune. Do any still exist?

Would the government keep that for cencus data or convert it to something more modern?

Chuck(G)
April 19th, 2009, 10:43 PM
Would the government keep that for cencus data or convert it to something more modern?

You mean like a IBM 1360 Photostore (http://www.computer-history.info/Page4.dir/pages/Photostore.dir/index.html)? :)

I suspect that the archival copies of the census data of the time were kept on many reels of 1/2" mag tape. That's certainly what it was distributed on.

Unknown_K
April 20th, 2009, 01:34 AM
That is very cool, I wonder what they did with the machines and chips when it was all backed up to something else. Would have loved to meet the engineers who came up with that. IBM still does some cutting edge storage research, plus the semiconductor processes they research for chips.

Terry Yager
April 20th, 2009, 11:55 AM
I ran across an IBM System 34 Mainframe before that had a multi- 8" floppy disk changer. The disks (about a dozen-or-so) stood vertically outside the drive, waiting to be selected and inserted into the machine one by one.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/System/34 Says that it's a mini, but it sure was big. Three fridge-size cabinets, plus a washer-sized printer and another washer-size paper handling system of some sort.

--T

Chuck(G)
April 20th, 2009, 12:53 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/System/34 Says that it's a mini, but it sure was big. Three fridge-size cabinets, plus a washer-sized printer and another washer-size paper handling system of some sort.

It's a mini if you didn't have to make structural changes in the building and install lots of HVAC to keep it cool. MG sets and chilled-water cooling towers are another sign of a real mainframe.

OT: I was surprised to find that iBM delivered its last 1403 printer in 1983 (http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/exhibits/attic3/attic3_024.html). Not bad for a printer that was part of the 1401 computer system!

IBMMuseum
April 20th, 2009, 01:36 PM
I ran across an IBM System 34 Mainframe before that had a multi- 8" floppy disk changer. The disks (about a dozen-or-so) stood vertically outside the drive, waiting to be selected and inserted into the machine one by one...

10-disk magazines on some models of the System/34. The diskettes (1.2Mb, if I'm not mistaken) had to be inserted in the magazine, but the magazine could be exchanged rather easily too. Two of the four System/34 I have are with the magazine floppy drive.

Terry Yager
April 20th, 2009, 02:27 PM
FOUR?!?!?! Damn, you are hard-core!<SEG> Must be nice to have space...

--T

Chuck(G)
April 20th, 2009, 02:47 PM
10-disk magazines on some models of the System/34. The diskettes (1.2Mb, if I'm not mistaken) had to be inserted in the magazine, but the magazine could be exchanged rather easily too. Two of the four System/34 I have are with the magazine floppy drive.

S/34 format would be 77x2x26x256 = 1025024 bytes, no? Just over or under 1MB, depending on what you use as a megabyte.

VintageComputerman
May 15th, 2010, 03:32 PM
I happened to run into the guy who owns the IBM system today and he is going to dig it out of storage. He said it comes with an IBM computer with an amber screen which piqued my interest. It stands about 3 ft high with some sort of arm that grabs a disk and places it into a disk drive of some sort. I think there are several drives. I think he said the IBM computer sits on top but before I could ask him about more details, I had to move my van because someone was behind me, I was blocking the road. I should know more next week. Didn't even get a chance to ask what he wanted for it.

VintageComputerman
June 19th, 2010, 05:38 AM
OK, I finally identified this system. It's an IBM 3995 Optical Library Data Server. I haven't seen it in person because it's in storage. It comes with an old IBM computer with amber screen. I have no idea of condition, although the guy did say it works and comes with a lot of disks. I am not interested in this unit, but I can put anyone in touch with the owner if you want further information. He wants to sell it. He did say he saw one on ebay a while back going for around 1500 but he doesn't expect to get that much. I really have no idea of his asking price.

Send me a PM if interested and I will see if I can get his email info today.

Raven
June 19th, 2010, 07:59 AM
http://minnesotacomputers.com/images/category/121.jpg

Sounds cool. Apparently there are several variants of 3995.