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View Full Version : Windozw and WiFi... or CrapINeedFifteenDifferentDrivers



TandyMan100
April 22nd, 2009, 05:24 AM
K', So I'm using windows (XP SP1, I think) to set up my wireless network. I install the card, Boot It Up, and it refuses to connect, five hours later, it still won't connect. I grab my knoppix live disk and slam it into the drive, reboot, and lo and behold, it finds the hardware and starts working immediatly. Sweet, sweet internet.

Why can't windows have as good of a hardware support as Ubuntu and Knoppix? I neve have to install drivers for generic (i.e. mice, keyboards, joysticks,etc.) stuff or cards, it just works. In Vista, I put in a new flash drive, and end up spending the next three hours searching for the disk that came with it, and even then it doesn't work.

Ubuntu, I connect a flash drive, refresh the desktop, and there's an icon on the desktop. I click on it, and there are my files. :angry:

Bloody Windoze.

Terry Yager
April 22nd, 2009, 11:27 AM
Heh! I just figgered out what you should call your new linux distro (when ya build it).

LAW...(LinuxAin'tWindose).

--T

Vlad
April 22nd, 2009, 12:10 PM
K', So I'm using windows (XP SP1, I think)


They release service packs for a reason, update it. XP Service Pack 1 is unsupported since SP 2 and 3 are out.


Why can't windows have as good of a hardware support as Ubuntu and Knoppix?Not MS's fault you're using an un-updated OS. And GNU/Linux has less than stellar hardware support. Try using an obscure device sometime or a WiFi card that has a chipset other than Realtek and Intel.


In Vista, I put in a new flash drive, and end up spending the next three hours searching for the disk I call BS on that. What was the make and model of the drive? Its also not Vista or MS's fault you lost the disc.


Ubuntu, I connect a flash drive, refresh the desktop, and there's an icon on the desktop. I click on it, and there are my files. :angry:

Bloody Windoze.If you hate it so much then don't use it. If GNU/Linux works better for you then go with it, that's the power of choice.

chuckcmagee
April 22nd, 2009, 12:12 PM
What I do with XP in that situation is hook up my wired ethernet connection first. Then I use the "find best driver" option which goes and looks thru all the Microsoft drivers out there on the internet. Works perfectly about 90% of the time. Sometimes, for weird stuff, like USB serial converters, I have to go grab the CD that came with the device. As the device gets more common, the drivers show up in the normal "find best driver" place later.

chuckcmagee
April 22nd, 2009, 12:17 PM
Linux has all those driver requirements too. Slap a certain version of a Linksys wireless-g pc-card adapter into the pcmcia slot and fire up linux. Voila, DOESN'T WORK. Turns out is has some strange chipset and, just like you, one has to go search google, find the firmware and driver source code, compile the source, etc. etc. So, really is 6 of one, half dozen of the other.

Oh, and of course, that same pc-card works perfectly in XP with no hassles.

84TAVeRT
April 22nd, 2009, 01:56 PM
your wifi card probably requires SP2...

i have noticed a lot of software lately that wont even install on less than sp2...

later,
Chris

TandyMan100
April 22nd, 2009, 02:28 PM
heh! I just figgered out what you should call your new linux distro (when ya build it).

law...(linuxain'twindose).

--t
perfect!

lutiana
April 22nd, 2009, 02:40 PM
K', So I'm using windows (XP SP1, I think) to set up my wireless network.

XP SP1 or earlier had some issues with wireless cards and connection if I recall. SP2 fixes that. Just upgrade the system to SP3 and you'll find some issues will go away.

tezza
April 22nd, 2009, 04:40 PM
Bloody Windoze.

Unless you completely control the hardware your software runs on (like Apple), there will always be issues with software and the drivers necessary to make hardware work. Older versions sometimes don't have support for new hardware and newer version often don't have support for older hardware. In rare cases, a software release simply doesn't support enough drivers. (early Vista?)

I've heard plenty of Linux horror stories too, so driver problems are not just limited to versions of Windows.

Tez

TandyMan100
April 23rd, 2009, 03:45 AM
Whoops, I actually gave SP2.

Raven
April 30th, 2009, 01:28 PM
Generally, due to Windows' obsessive nature of maintaining backwards-compatibility, I find that it's built-in driver library tends to support more than that of *nix. However, modern devices are less likely to need drivers on *nix, due to the OSS community rushing drivers in, while on Windows you need to use your disks, as it's driver library isn't updated as quickly.

Edit: Woot, 100 posts.

patscc
April 30th, 2009, 02:21 PM
I see lots of blame going towards the OS's of choices for drivers.

In Windows-land, it's the manufacturers that write drivers for the OS. I think MS will write your driver for you if you pay them for it, but...
Periodically MS will come up with a generic driver for something that's common, but typically drivers come from the manufacturer, who sometimes get them added to the distribution disk, and more often not. If the manufacturer writes a crappy, unstable driver, especially one that has parts that run in kernel mode, what's a poor OS to do ? MS release gigs of reference materials in their SDK's on how to write drivers for this, that, and the other under whatever the current or coming release of Windows is, so it's not like it's a big secret on writing a driver to interface with Windows, and if you, as a driver writer, don't understand the hardware you're writing for...
OSS OS's, pretty much the same, I think, except not so many manufactures write the drivers, but it's probably still not the same teams as write the OS.
This is changing, but for years manufacturers were less than keen to give development info on their hardware to OSS driver writers, and there used to be some pretty flaky stuff for *nix, or drivers that only would do "bare-bones" features. Trying to shoehorn X-Windows onto video cards during the '90's linux in particular brings up bad memories.

I've seen all sorts of OS over the years choke on bad drivers, drivers for one piece of hardware that someone's trying to shoehorn into doing something else, drivers that won't work on the most recent version, drivers that won't work on the previous version, you name it.

Some OS's even have a hardware compatibility list that most people ignore with stuff that has been tested and is known to work.

As it's always been, if you throw cheap hardware with crappy drivers at something, you'll end up paying the price.

patscc

tezza
April 30th, 2009, 04:41 PM
Well said patscc

Tez