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vic user
March 15th, 2005, 02:49 PM
my work was going to throw out:

computer dictionary and handbook
by charles j. sippl

printed in 1966

man, i can't believe it has 766 pages!

neat to see no mention of many things common to me like floppy drive etc.. and so many terms i have no idea about.

the appendices are really cool.

there are remarks from industry leaders on "the brain machine" "what is a computer", acronyms, and on and on.

god, i wish i had the time to scan the book in for people

chris

joe sixpack
March 15th, 2005, 11:18 PM
i love looking at old books and seeing how they stack up to today's systems
most time i find them to be very accurate even now. course i've never
found a book that far back, intresting read i bet.

olddataman
March 20th, 2005, 08:34 AM
Hi,
We used to sell a whole lot of those when I had my computer store in 1976 through 1983. For the first year or so you would have had to been there to believe the activity in the store every day and especially on weekends when they came in by car, airplane and any other mode of transportation they could find.
I can honestly say that no new customer ever left the store without having sent at least $100.00 for books, magazines, back-issues of magazines, computer generated art (framed or unframed), posters, tools, components or just about anythng else you can imagine that was related to a computer. And of course many would leave with a computer and a few add-on boards, games, application software, a TV monitor and sometimes a teletypewriter or crt terminal or a keyboard and interface for it. When a customer asked about the price for a computer with a configuration that would let him do something real, believe it or not, I woujld respond as follows: Lets not talk about how much it would cost first. First, tel;l me how much you have to spend. I'm going to get it all anyway, and if I know how much money we are talking about I can make the best configuration possible for that amount of money." Sometimes they would ask if this computer was going to be obsolete when they bought it. My response to that was: "It wa technologiclly obsolete when it was designed. The question you should ask is Will it be usefull long nough for me to write it off!"
Well, enough war stories for now. But it is fun to hear that someone has found something that was "new" what to me sounds like just a few yars ago, until I actually count them.
Ray

joe sixpack
March 20th, 2005, 09:16 AM
When a customer asked about the price for a computer with a configuration that would let him do something real, believe it or not, I woujld respond as follows: Lets not talk about how much it would cost first. First, tel;l me how much you have to spend. I'm going to get it all anyway, and if I know how much money we are talking about I can make the best configuration possible for that amount of money."

Sometimes they would ask if this computer was going to be obsolete when they bought it. My response to that was: "It wa technologiclly obsolete when it was designed. The question you should ask is Will it be usefull long nough for me to write it off!"
Ray

well it might be the truth but a very blunt way of putting it, not exactly winning me over.

olddataman
March 20th, 2005, 10:45 AM
Dear Joe Sixpack,

I missed my point. And I agree that it was probably not "the way to win friends and influence people" in most cases, But I did it with a smile amd never before getting at leastt somewhat acquainted. Noone ever seemed to take offence, and most became multiple repeat customers. I think it was just a "thing" of the times. I also never had a detected case of shop lifting, never had a bad check and never demanded pre-payment befoe I shipped a mail or phone order. It was like living in a new world, where everyone was part of a big family. The only people who did not always pay were a few other computer stores that I sold stiff that I knew where and how to get that they didn't. As I told another forum a few days ago, we did not make much money but we were too busy and having too much fun to notice.
Ray

Terry Yager
March 20th, 2005, 02:22 PM
I always took a similar approach when I was working on cars, especially when dealing with hot-rodders and other customizers (who were among my best customers). Don't ask me how many extra horsepower I can hang onto your engine, just tell me how much $$$ you are willing to spend on it, and I'll see to it that you get the most bang for your buck.

--T

olddataman
March 20th, 2005, 02:29 PM
Terry;
EXACTLY! And it worked and I made a lot of friends. Many who are still friends, almost 30 years later.
Ray

Terry Yager
March 20th, 2005, 02:31 PM
Honesty is usually the best policy.

--T

carlsson
March 24th, 2005, 08:03 AM
Funny. Where I work, we've recently try to find our customers the best offer in the same way; you send a request with your budget to all possible service providers and then it is up to them if they want to meet the customer's budget or insist on getting the official price for their services. It is not exactly like how you worked, as you would ask for the maximum budget while our customers tend to be cheapskates setting their budget as low as possible, possibly willing to spend more once they find what the market in reality can offer.

olddataman
March 24th, 2005, 01:14 PM
Well, by asking first I let the customer set the budget at whatever he wished. I would configure the best system I could for the money and let him increase the budget when he saw how inadequate the system would be for that amount of money. Once in a while, with a real cheapskate, I would show him an itemized list of what he was being offered for the money he stated, and my actual costs plus shipping costs in a seperate column. When he saw how little actual gross profit there was, he would very often offer more than I asked. It was a crazy, dynamic, whirlwind fun and riot of a business.
Ray