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Erik
April 2nd, 2005, 10:49 AM
I was interviewed via email a week or so back for the articles that Terry was nice enough to post.

As input to this one: http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1759,1780863,00.asp?kc=EWYH104039TX1B0000665 I was asked which the five most valuable collectable computers out there were. My answers were close to, but not exactly in line with what was published.

What would your answers have been?

Erik

Terry Yager
April 2nd, 2005, 11:59 AM
I pretty much agree on the first two. Apple Is routinly bring over $20,000.00 when they sell, and Lisa 1s with Twiggy drives consistantly sell for over 10K.
I dunno if the PDP-8 would've made my list tho, I had no idea they were that rare. What does one sell for today?
The Altair and IMSAI are probably the most popular among collectors, but not necessarily the costliest or most valuable.

--T

billdeg
April 5th, 2005, 05:10 AM
Please don't shoot me (electronically)...

I respectfully consider the article/list to be the "established pop culture" answer to this question. I think that in general the Apples are over-valued because these are the computers used more often by writers (now MACs) and therefore will get more press. This is a generalization, but I know that the percentage of MAC users in the general public is lower than that used by writers and designers. This is why the Apple I prototype is valued while other prototypes of the era are unknown.

I would be happy to trade an IMSAI for many of the computers found on http://www.blinkenlights.com/pc.shtml, one of my favorite web pages.

Over time the Apple Lisa and IMSAI could move down the list, and the Xerox Alto and older Intels (SIM4, etc). could move up as they become more well-known and/or get publicity.

There is an unintentional underlying theme presented by this article. The valuation of vintage computers is only just underway.

Exluddite
April 5th, 2005, 07:19 AM
That's definately true. Someone could find enough info over time to do an Economics thesis on "Article in **** radically raises market value of computer ****". Something gets a big splash on Slashdot or Wired and suddenly every geek in the land wants one...for the next few months anyway. Then the machine falls back into it's relative obscurity. (Thank god, because as I think Terry pointed out in another thread, the hype just makes things overpriced.)
I think the list is going to stand up over time. The machines listed tend to be rare as well as posessing an important place in the historical development of computers. I know there are machines out there that might demand even more money because they are one-of-a-kind or only a handful exist, but that kind of knocks them out of the "collectable" category for the most part doesn't it?

Terry Yager
April 5th, 2005, 09:37 AM
I know this horse died a year ago, but I haven't kicked it in a while so,


I know there are machines out there that might demand even more money because they are one-of-a-kind or only a handful exist, but that kind of knocks them out of the "collectable" category for the most part doesn't it?

My most-prized (computer) possession is one that is perceived as having no value:

http://www.vintage-computer.com/vcforum/viewtopic.php?t=944

It's a one-of-a-kind homebrew, and no market for it exists, therefore, not collectible (to anyone but me).

--T

billdeg
April 5th, 2005, 10:32 AM
Terry - I completely agree with you...I remember your post. To be honest I really don't care what people think/write about anyway...I have as much chance of getting an original Apple I as a Cray so what's the difference.

To my knowledge I am the only person with a homebrew TI system (I have described in a few posts recently), and I admit that it's one of my favorites. Maybe I should write an article about it and try to get a movie star to use it in a period movie or photo shoot. "...and here we have Pamela Anderson lounging by the pool and programming assembly code using her homebrew TI 9900 system and Zenith serial terminal. Pictured in the backgroud we have Bill Degnan reading to her from the users manual..". That should help me pay for my kids college fund.

On the otherhand, I acutally used a Xerox Altos once, it was the coolest computer I have ever seen. If anyone has one, please mail it to me, I will pay postage :-)

Allison
April 5th, 2005, 03:29 PM
Terry - I completely agree with you...I remember your post. To be honest I really don't care what people think/write about anyway...I have as much chance of getting an original Apple I as a Cray so what's the difference.

To my knowledge I am the only person with a homebrew TI system (I have described in a few posts recently), and I admit that it's one of my favorites. Maybe I should write an article about it and try to get a movie

snipped


Your not alone. I built a 9900 based system back in '77 and later bought a
demo Technico Super starter system for the linebyline assembler roms.

As to most rare and expensive...

The PDP-12 not many made and few left.
Also the parts to make an 11/74 , there were at most a few.

Allison

Terry Yager
April 5th, 2005, 08:42 PM
Somebody please stop the madness...

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=1247&item=5180915491&rd=1&ssPageName=WDVW

--T

joe sixpack
April 6th, 2005, 12:10 AM
Somebody please stop the madness...

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=1247&item=5180915491&rd=1&ssPageName=WDVW

--T

HAHAHA i sure the hell am not paying that!
Must be one of those crazy mad hardcore collectors or something.

Micom 2000
April 6th, 2005, 05:57 PM
It might be noted that the seller and bidder were both new to ePay and
had 0 bidding/seller status. Until I noticed that I had strong motivation to work on my Osborne 1 which works but the KB connection is faulty. Now
I'm back to prevaricating on it. Maybe I'm suffering computer burn-out
from too many years getting the old beasts working.

It was depressing to see a pkg. of 2 Kaypros (a much better machine) and complete docs and programs, going for less than $15 at the same time.

Terry Yager
April 6th, 2005, 06:12 PM
I looked up the recent ended auctions of O1s, and there have been 4 of them in the past month. Ending prices were $57.00, 82.50, 152.00, and the 300.00 one, in that order, so the prices are on an upturn, whether temporary or not. Not too bad for a machine that you could barely give away a couple months ago. Mebbe I'll even dig mine out of storage...

--T

carlsson
April 7th, 2005, 06:38 AM
"Could barely give away", isn't that a slight exaggeration? Surely you have been able to get $10 excl. shipping for a working unit for the last 10-15 years?

Terry Yager
April 7th, 2005, 07:32 AM
Mebbe a slight exageration, but really, they have been selling on eBay for $10.00 - 20.00 for some time. I think it's the shipping that puts people off. I know that a while back, I watched a Compaq Portable 286 go for one dollar, and I couldn't do anything about it because at the time, I couldn't pony-up the $30.00 - 35.00 it would cost to ship it.

--T

Terry Yager
April 22nd, 2005, 09:03 AM
Ha! Looks like the (eBay) market has normalized again:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=5186337373&rd=1&sspagename=STRK%3AMEWA%3AIT&rd=1

...and:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=5186510080&rd=1&sspagename=STRK%3AMEWA%3AIT&rd=1

--T

Micom 2000
April 22nd, 2005, 05:42 PM
There's also 1 that was listed at a starting bid of $350 with no bidders a few days ago. Can't bother to find the URL.

It seems the Vintage Computer category has had an upswing in prices in the last while. Perhaps an upswing in the US economy or else a resignation that economic conditions aren't likely to get better. I stopped
listing computer items for the last 2 years out of digust for what things were going for. Except for the occasional goody you must have, most real collectors get their stuff from yard sales, thrift shops, curbsides or dumpster diving in any case. E-Pay sales only help to support your habit.
ComputerJunky-wise that is.

CP/M User
April 23rd, 2005, 01:33 AM
"Erik" wrote:

> What would your answers have been?

Well I think it's quite obvious what I would have said, so I won't say it & point peoples attention to my interests cause it still printed there. It was also tracked down & posted in here (a long time ago) - but I'll just stick with the emulator & perhaps get it built someday (maybe in my retirement years!) cause it's an unusal system with an unique language built-in to boot.

Apple I is a rare piece of work, but I thought they only sold 100 of these things (not 200) - it didn't even have it's own box, just sat out in the open on some board (or so I believe). Lisa 1 is another due to the expense of it & no colour (so no big market).

However another rumor has popped up about the Amstrad CPC machines. Ebay in the UK was supposed to be selling an Amstrad CPC464 which came with some programming stuff & operated around a 6502 based processor (the regular CPCs have a Z80). If this were true, I believe it would be much rarer than an Apple I. It was suggested that this machine came out the same time Software Companies got a Z80 based CPC to write the games for (for when the release date of the CPCs were to be put out on the markets - with games to go for it). The 6502 is believe to be a prototype of something Amstrad were looking at for their system - I felt it was dropped so that it could have a processor which could compete with the C64. In any case the bloke on Ebay seemed to be getting some high bids for this supposively rare machine (well not real expensive - but not cheap! ;-)

CP/M User.