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View Full Version : Scanning a CPU with a scanner (Was: question)



wolfie
July 14th, 2009, 08:25 PM
is it safe to scan proccessor using a scanner? it won't ruin them would it? i had thought about taking picture but scanning them would seem more resonable.

NathanAllan
July 14th, 2009, 08:54 PM
What kind of processor are you referring to? Most procs I know of are okay to photo. ROM chips can have a window used to erase them, however. I wouldn't chance using a flah on those if I wantd the data intact.

wolfie
July 14th, 2009, 09:13 PM
i was thinking 386 and 486 proccessors. i was wanting to use a scanner because picture of the proccessor information never come out clear.

Chuck(G)
July 14th, 2009, 09:26 PM
i was thinking 386 and 486 proccessors. i was wanting to use a scanner because picture of the proccessor information never come out clear.

It will work just fine. Scan away! Even EPROMs with a window on them should be safe--the scanner table is usually a sheet of glass and so would block whatever short-wave UV the scanner lamp generated.

mbbrutman
July 15th, 2009, 02:19 AM
is it safe to scan proccessor using a scanner? it won't ruin them would it? i had thought about taking picture but scanning them would seem more resonable.

If you make an image of a processor with a scanner you will steal it's soul.

No seriously. Shining a florescent light on an object and capturing the photons reflected back will usually not hurt anything, including living things.

In the future, pick a more descriptive topic. 'question' is not a proper subject.

carlsson
July 15th, 2009, 03:41 AM
On the topic of EPROMs, usually you have to put them in the eraser for at least 15-20 minutes, perhaps up to an hour to make sure they're erased. I'm not sure one flash of light does any difference at all, and you could anyway cover the hole with a bit of tape if you were concerned.

I suppose you will only scan the upper side of the chips, so you don't place them with lots of legs onto the glass which may cause scratches.

Bobthearch
July 15th, 2009, 04:13 AM
I've never scanned computer parts, but have done other three-dimensional items frequently. A couple of tips:

Some scanners do not have a field of depth sufficient for solid objects. The all-in-one printer/scanners are usually poor. Epson stand-alone scanners are generally the best.

You can lay a second piece of glass, or even a sheet of plastic wrap, on the scanner. That'll help protect the scanner glass, which is difficult to replace if scratched.

Lay the item on the scanner and cover it up with something that's opaque and a contrasting color. A shirt, piece of construction paper, canvas, etc.

With the scanner it's very easy to zoom in on small details.

--------------------

As an example, here are two pocketknife images done on a scanner. The first shows a rather large and deep object, highlighting the good field-of-depth focus that Epson scanners have. The second shows a zoomed and insert tang stamp - might be useful or interesting with a processor's serial number or other markings.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v287/Bobthearch/knives/Prentice.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v287/Bobthearch/knives/194OTerror.jpg

Hope this helps.
-Bob