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pitlog
August 26th, 2009, 08:13 AM
Hello All,

I have a Kaypro 4 '84 and am trying to set up Vedit Plus 2.33b.

When running the install app, and configuring the terminal type, there are choices for a variety of serial terminals (vt100, adm-3a, etc) and some for computer models, but nothing for a Kaypro.

There is a utility for configuring new terminals, but you have to know about the terminal escape sequences for the term you are configuring. And of course I know nothing about how the Kaypro 4 is set up. Is it just a dumb terminal with no screen addressing capabilities? Does it emulate something else?

Also, it looks like the backspace key and the left arrow key are both wired to <ctrl> H. Is there a way to change this so I can get both cursor positioning and traditional destructive backspace?

These might be obscure questions, but I'm hoping there are still some Kaypro gurus out there.

Cheers,
Tom

pitlog
August 26th, 2009, 01:42 PM
Well, I guess I'm not as smart as I look :)

It turns out that there are second and third screens of terminal definitions in the Vedit install program, and on the second page are two definitions for Kaypro 83 and Kaypro 84. Using Kaypro 84 and fiddling with the keyboard definitions got me 100% of what I wanted.

Now to get Aztec C and Pascal MT+ working...

Cheers,
Tom

pitlog
August 27th, 2009, 04:23 AM
I just thought I'd mention that after a bit of fiddling around, I was able to build a machine to create Kaypro 4 diskettes on an MS-DOS system. I can grab stuff from the net, burn it to a CD-ROM, and then copy it to CP/M formatted disks with 22disk.

Now this may be old hat to you experts out there, but it was a revelation to me.

As of last night, I've got vedit (a marvelous old programmer's editor), z80 MASM, Aztec C, and Pascal MT+ all working correctly.

The only other thing I really want to do is replace the DSHD floppy in my DOS box to a real 360K drive, making formatting disks and copying files much more reliable.

Anyway, this makes the difference between an interesting old piece of technology, and something I can really have fun with.

-Tom