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Trooper
September 1st, 2009, 01:07 PM
Could someone please inform me of what polarity the AC adapter for the CC-40 uses? I can't find any information of whether it's negative or positive tip.

Thanks in advance!

/T

Ksarul
September 2nd, 2009, 06:05 PM
I'll check my adapter and let you know. . .

JGardner
September 2nd, 2009, 09:58 PM
Outside (+) , inside (-)

Jack

Vint
February 17th, 2010, 01:04 PM
6 VDC and negative tip is correct.
I too searched long for this info and came up blank. So I just tried a universal AC adapter and 'guessed' at positive tip. It didn't work, so I switched to negative tip and my CC-40 fired right up. Therefore, using a positive tip position causes no harm to the unit - which is what I imagine Trooper was concerned about. I believe most items that don't state whether they use negative or positive tip are protected from wrong polarity damage - but you never know. I like to know going in, just to be safe. All TI had to do was put a small icon at the power jack like most companies do. I guess they figure what's the difference since you can't hurt it but as seen here time was wasted for me and for Trooper researching.

I won on eBay this nice CC-40 which arrived yesterday.

http://www.vintage-computer.com/vcforum/attachment.php?attachmentid=3139
http://www.vintage-computer.com/vcforum/attachment.php?attachmentid=3138
http://www.vintage-computer.com/vcforum/attachment.php?attachmentid=3137

I've wanted one for a long time, mainly because I like the size and it was an oddball and a dud in the market place. To me, that's surely a good reason to welcome this small 'glorified' calculator into my collection. It really does have a nifty subset of TI99 BASIC. Fun to play with. Mine was made in November of 1983 and it doesn't have a scratch on it. I'll bet it spent most of it's life on a closet shelf.
It came with a large manual too. I picked this up for $10.50 - not too shabby :)

curtis
February 18th, 2010, 09:06 AM
They really are nice little machines. Lots of flexibility when you combine the hexbus peripherals and the PCIF from the dockbus world. That gives you the ability to save your programs. Of course, if you're trying to use a newer computer, you'll definitely need TIIF from Peter Engels. See the TIIF 4.0 announcement in this section.

Then again, if you want to use the PCIF, you'll need to build an adapter to go from hexbus to dockbus. Not hard to do at all if you're fairly handy with a soldering iron.

As far as being a dud, yeah, the CC-40 got caught up in the blood letting of the 99/4A. However, it was "reborn" as the TI-74. Slightly smaller physical size, but essentially the same nifty little machine.

If you're interested in building a hexbus to dockbus adapter, check directions at http://suddenlink.net/pages/curtismc/7495.htm

If you're REALLY good with a soldering iron and want to tackle making your own PCIF, here's the schematic : http://suddenlink.net/pages/curtismc/PC_Interface.jpg What a person could do, if they were of a mind to, is to substitute a hexbus for the dockbus shown. Then you wouldn't need the hexbus to dockbus adapter. The PCIF is really the only dockbus peripheral that is useful on the CC-40.

Enjoy your new toy!

Vint
February 18th, 2010, 11:51 AM
Interesting stuff - thanks Curtis.

mutantcamel
March 19th, 2010, 10:51 AM
I just tryed a univeral 6V Adapter with my CC-40. It works although there seems to be a lot of intereference on the LCD display (wavey lines) and parts of the flashing cursor behaves erratically. Is it the wrong type of adapter? I quickly unplugged it as I didn't want to damage my computer.

Universal 3-12V AC/DC adapter 300mA, 230v- 50hz

Vint
March 19th, 2010, 12:55 PM
. . . . . .
As far as being a dud, yeah, the CC-40 got caught up in the blood letting of the 99/4A. However, it was "reborn" as the TI-74. Slightly smaller physical size, but essentially the same nifty little machine.

Well, I recently scored on a TI-74 in fine condition -

http://www.vintage-computer.com/vcforum/attachment.php?attachmentid=3333
http://www.vintage-computer.com/vcforum/attachment.php?attachmentid=3332

to which I am quite pleased. I now have more dedicated Texas Instruments 'stuff' than anything else in my collections. As a side note: I've wanted a TI-59 in my vintage collection (I had one, and it's companion printer the PC100A back in 1977) - but alas 'usually' the internal card reader and battery packs are shot and need replacing. I found it less nostalgic, but a lot cheaper to buy a TI-74. I got this one alone with a fine HP 12C financial programmable for $36. I'm really liking the TI-74 and my other recent buy - the TI CC40. They are quite fun machines, and I'm sure a, 'vanishing' breed.
mutantcamel I'm certainly no expert, but I'd 'suggest' trying a different adapter and maybe with 500ma output or more. Could just be bad filtering from the wall wart. That's my opinion speaking, not fact.

JGardner
March 20th, 2010, 03:09 PM
Vint -

Check out the docs at

ftp://ftp.whtech.com/hexbus_cc40_ti74/

particularly

ftp://ftp.whtech.com/hexbus_cc40_ti74/CC40%20Editor-Assembler/

You can do a lot with these little guys :cool:

Jack

curtis
March 20th, 2010, 06:03 PM
As a side note: I've wanted a TI-59 in my vintage collection (I had one, and it's companion printer the PC100A back in 1977) - but alas 'usually' the internal card reader and battery packs are shot and need replacing. I

If you like the TI-59, you might look into a TI-95. Looks almost identical to the 74, but is step programmable like the 58 and 59. AND it uses the same peripherals as the 74!

They do appear on ebay on a semi-regular basis for fairly reasonable prices.

Vint
March 21st, 2010, 10:22 AM
Thanks for the links, JGardner, - some great stuff there I wasn't aware of.

I was checking out the TI-95, Curtis, and I ran across a nice TI-95 Emulator to play with till the day I get my hands on a real one :)

JGardner
March 21st, 2010, 10:31 AM
> I ran across a nice TI-95 Emulator to play with...

Care to share it with us? I'm interested.

Jack

Vint
March 21st, 2010, 01:03 PM
Here's the link to the TI-95 emulator
http://www.hrastprogrammer.com/
The actual emulator zip is almost at the bottom of the page.

Also, if anyone is interested are some nice calc emulators here http://www.friedemann-seebass.de/almetr_e.html
Be sure to download qt-mt230nc.zip, a dll file you'll need.
I found a nice Casio FX3600P and a Casio FX-85V emulators here.
Also was a nice TI-30 emulator. I especially like the TI-30 emulator because it saves wear and tear on my vintage 'real' 1977 model TI-30, when I just wish to delve back into the book that came with all the original TI-30's back in the 70's, The Great International Math On Keys. Now I know a TI-30 isn't anything special - but I had one (and the book), back in the 70's - so it's nostalgic for me. Therefore I consider it actually part of my vintage computer collection. It has a processor, of sorts, and it's part of the whole binary world we all got caught up in. It helped shape today.