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dave_m
September 2nd, 2009, 02:02 PM
Does anyone know where I can procure a ready made C2N232 gadget?

It was designed by this gentleman:
Marko Makela (http://www.ktverkko.fi/~msmakela/8bit/c2n232/index.en.html)

I am planning on pounding in a large basic program on my 8032 PET that is in a book plublished by Compute! but I have no way to save it as this point.
-Dave

tezza
September 2nd, 2009, 02:17 PM
Hi Dave,

Does the 8032 support the Vic20 and C-64 cassette recorders? These are so common people can't even give them away. Or are you looking at transferring the program to a modern machine for storage?

Tez

dave_m
September 2nd, 2009, 02:48 PM
Tez,
Yes, the 8032 supports a cassette drive and I have recently bought one that is slowly coming by U.S. Pony Express from New York. I suppose that would do for local storage, but I would like to have the software available to the PET users community. In its final form, it is a program that will be an assembly language RAM based version of Batpro that will safely reside in the upper 4K of RAM memory. It will work on all versions of the PET and the Commodore 64.

carlsson
September 2nd, 2009, 02:57 PM
A number of C2N232I exist in kit form, but it takes some SMD soldering skills to put one together. For various reasons those kits never were assembled, but if you want I can put you in touch with a gentleman who apparently have kits to sell.

In the mean time, you could consider solder together either of the cbmlink compatible cables (http://www.zimmers.net/anonftp/pub/cbm/crossplatform/transfer/C2N232/cbmlink.html#hw-conn). They won't be as fast as the C2N232, but all are supported by the same software.

dave_m
September 2nd, 2009, 09:00 PM
A number of C2N232I exist in kit form, but it takes some SMD soldering skills to put one together. For various reasons those kits never were assembled, but if you want I can put you in touch with a gentleman who apparently have kits to sell. .

Yes, please especially if the chip is pre-programmed. If not, is it a hard chip to program?



In the mean time, you could consider solder together either of the cbmlink compatible cables (http://www.zimmers.net/anonftp/pub/cbm/crossplatform/transfer/C2N232/cbmlink.html#hw-conn). They won't be as fast as the C2N232, but all are supported by the same software.

This is a kind of confusing page with lots of cables. The PC that I will be using is an 133MHz Pentium with both a parallel and serial port. Is the cable I want to build the PC64 cable or the prlink cable with connections between the PET User Port and the PC parallel port?

On the PC side, will the cbmlink software work with DOS or maybe an older version of Windows like Windows 95? I hope I will not have to compile a lot of C source code as that is a little over my head with my lack of software tools, etc. I took a unix class a hundred years ago and I don't remember any of it. :)

The C2N232 software looks a little more straight forward for a non programmer.

Thanks,
Dave

carlsson
September 2nd, 2009, 11:36 PM
Yes, I think the PC64 cable is the recommended one if it works for your purpose. There should exist DOS/Windows executables, otherwise I may be able to compile some for you. I could even make Win32 command line executables using the MinGW/gcc compiler.

dave_m
September 3rd, 2009, 04:02 PM
Anders, OK I'll try to build the PC64 cable first. I will go over all the software information on the cbmlink page and if I get stuck, I call for help here.
Thanks, Dave

dave_m
September 14th, 2009, 03:27 PM
OK, I have the parts to build the PC64 cable. But before I get too far, can someone verify that on the PET side, I will be hooking up to the user port that contains the PA0 through PA8 signals?

The cmblink documentation calls out the PB0 through PB8 signals on the cable wire list which I think must be a typo.
Thanks, Dave

cbmlink release notes (http://www.zimmers.net/anonftp/pub/cbm/crossplatform/transfer/C2N232/cbmlink.html#hw-conn)

carlsson
September 14th, 2009, 10:21 PM
The signals have different names depending which C= computer you are looking at, i.e. compare the manuals for the VIC-20 and C64. Generally PA0-PA7 should be equal to PB0-PB7, but as you can see in two designs there is a PA2 which on the third (Amiga) design says CB2.

dave_m
September 16th, 2009, 02:36 PM
Anders,
I am well along with my pc64 cable as I started with a PC parallel port extension cable and cut off the socket end and will hook up the PET user port connector there. Oddly the wires did not follow the brown, red, orange, etc color code for 1,2,3 as I thought it might. I'm glad I buzzed it out.

Is it possible for you to build me a MS-DOS executable file with the following parameters:
Cable type: pc64
computer type: PET4001
Memory Expansion: plain
Thanks, Dave

carlsson
September 16th, 2009, 04:18 PM
I'll try to remember that for tonight, about 17-18 hours from now.

MikeS
September 16th, 2009, 09:48 PM
Anders,
I am well along with my pc64 cable as I started with a PC parallel port extension cable and cut off the socket end and will hook up the PET user port connector there. Oddly the wires did not follow the brown, red, orange, etc color code for 1,2,3 as I thought it might. I'm glad I buzzed it out.

Is it possible for you to build me a MS-DOS executable file with the following parameters:
Cable type: pc64
computer type: PET4001
Memory Expansion: plain
Thanks, Dave

4001??? I thought it was for an 8032? In which case I wouldn't mind a copy...

carlsson
September 17th, 2009, 12:30 AM
Well, as far as I understand the serial software on the PC side should be identical no matter what machine you connect the cable to.

MikeS
September 17th, 2009, 01:24 AM
Well, as far as I understand the serial software on the PC side should be identical no matter what machine you connect the cable to.
---
Well, I was actually just yanking Dave's chain, but if there really *is* a 4001 model then my face will be very red indeed...

carlsson
September 17th, 2009, 02:18 AM
It doesn't seem too uncommon that people refer to the 4000 series as the 4001 series, even if there is no machine with that specific number. Likewise for the 3001 series, which would be equivalent to the 3000 series. I suppose people do this because they think about the 2001 and assume all PET/CBM should have a model number ending on 1 or higher.

Actually it seems in Germany and perhaps Sweden, the PET/CBM 3008 was sold as 3001. I can't say I ever saw one myself, but I may have missed that detail. I suppose this was an alternative to calling it 2001N.

This page claims the PET 3001 had to be renamed as CBM 3008 due to the brand conflict with Philips.
http://www.cbmitapages.it/pet/pet-modeng.htm

dave_m
September 17th, 2009, 06:17 AM
4001??? I thought it was for an 8032? In which case I wouldn't mind a copy...

Mike, the callout 'pet4001' causes cbmlink to use an 'include subdirectory' in the make file that contains the 40XX and 80XX PET families as I understand it (I'm no expert on this stuff).
-Dave
cbmlink software (http://www.zimmers.net/anonftp/pub/cbm/crossplatform/transfer/C2N232/cbmlink.html#comp-src)

dave_m
October 2nd, 2009, 11:05 AM
Mike, the callout 'pet4001' causes cbmlink to use an 'include subdirectory' in the make file that contains the 40XX and 80XX PET families as I understand it (I'm no expert on this stuff).


I was all wrong there. The pet4001, pc64 designations were too simply help one find the right place in the directory tree to find the correct server side program (PET prg file).

After messing around with the bcc compiler which can target DOS com files, I had to give up. Without having a Windows equivalent to the unix 'make' command, I could not use the makefile.DOS properly.

However I found a Win32 executable in the archives (cbmlink.exe), so now my plan will be to add a PCI parallel port to my XP machine and run cbmlink from there. This is not as handy as the two machines are not in the same room, but it should work.

MikeS
October 2nd, 2009, 10:30 PM
I've looked at CBMlink a few times and given up in frustration every time; there's mention of a DOS binary in several places but I've never found one.

When I read "it is assumed that anyone using DOS would use Linux if he could" I knew this was going to be way more complicated than it needs to be...

Guess I'm spoiled by the straightforward transfer routines for my other machines.

mike

dave_m
October 3rd, 2009, 08:10 AM
When I read "it is assumed that anyone using DOS would use Linux if he could" I knew this was going to be way more complicated than it needs to be...


Yes, I was puzzled by that statement also. But after hours trying to compile cbmlink using bcc and a large array in input c files, I now understand that the author was gently telling us that you will need to have a machine running linux and a full set of compiler tools to correctly generate the file.

As to why he just didnít include 'cbmlink.com' in his archive, Iím guessing that unix gurus think that software is so much fun that he didnít want to cheat the rest of us from having the pleasure of compiling our own executable.

Personally, I would rather have just grabbed the executable and proceeded with my main project of transferring some PET software. :)
-Dave

MikeS
October 3rd, 2009, 12:58 PM
Yes, I was puzzled by that statement also. But after hours trying to compile cbmlink using bcc and a large array in input c files, I now understand that the author was gently telling us that you will need to have a machine running linux and a full set of compiler tools to correctly generate the file.

As to why he just didnít include 'cbmlink.com' in his archive, Iím guessing that unix gurus think that software is so much fun that he didnít want to cheat the rest of us from having the pleasure of compiling our own executable.

Personally, I would rather have just grabbed the executable and proceeded with my main project of transferring some PET software. :)
-Dave
Don't get me started on these folks who insist that just plugging in a tool to do a job is not 'real' computing, and that everyone needs to know how to compile from source, where to find the tools and sift through the many revisions etc., and finally be able to figure out why it won't compile which is usually the case...

dave_m
October 7th, 2009, 01:36 PM
OK, with the windows version of cbmlink, I got it to communicate successfully with my PET using the pc64 cable between the PET User Port and the parallel port of the PC. The instructions were a bit incomplete but one can fill in the gaps easily enough. The author is Finnish so it is understandable that writing a ‘bullet proof’ technical instruction in English might be fairly difficult. But his code is great.

Here are my notes on using cbmlink on a PC running Windows 98 and a PET 8032. Perhaps this will be useful as a supplement to the author’s instructions. See link below for authors' instructions.

cbmlink release notes for parallel cables (http://www.zimmers.net/anonftp/pub/cbm/crossplatform/transfer/C2N232/cbmlink.html#start-boot-par)

There is a neat way provided to transfer the server software into the PET. One types-in a short loader in BASIC. When run, it waits patiently for a load command on the user port. On the PC, in a DOS window, one changes to the subdirectory where the cbmlink program (cmblink.exe) and the files to be transferred are located, and enters the command line:
cbmlink –c pc64 0x378 –l plain.prg

This is for the pc64 cable protocol, and the LPT1 port and the proper server program to be loaded for your computer/configuration from the cbmlink-cbmprg.zip file. The instructions say that you can use port numbers like 0,1,2 or 3 but this did not work for me. The instruction also had an example of 0x3bc for LPT1 but that may be a typo. Perhaps they are for Windows XP.

Every once in a while I can get an error after executing a command that says something like no such protocol as pc45 even though I entered pc64. No matter. Just repeat the command.

This first server program is fixed to run at memory location $7C00. It is started with a sys 31744. Then one can transfer the re-locatable version if wanted from the cbmlink-cbmbasic.zip file. I needed that version as I will be transferring machine language code that will reside in the $7000 block of RAM, so I transferred the re-locatable one next. It then says to perform a SAVE of the transferred file. But it will not save correctly in BASIC. I had to go to the Machine Language Monitor (sys 1024) and determine the size of the ML program and perform the save there:

.s ”name”, 01,0401,0930 to save the re-locatable server on cassette.
.s “name1”,01,7C00,7D9F to save the fixed address server on casstte.

Another issue with the re-locatable version was that after you load it but before you run it, you are to change the second line of the BASIC portion of the program to point to the desired starting address. But the instructions are somewhat vague about telling you to delete the default second line that is there. If you do not, when run, the program hits a 00H ‘break instruction’ and lands in the monitor program.

A few times when it was run, the server software would immediately hang the PET. But it always seems to work the next time after a hard reset or power cycle. Nothing’s perfect in life.

One other thing that is important to remember is that just before or after the server is installed, say at $7C00, one must reset the top of BASIC so that the server code will not be stepped on later on if other programs are to be run. This is done in BASIC 4 with:
POKE 53, 124 : POKE 52,0 : new : REM sets top of BASIC to $7C00

The last thing to remember is that the addresses used in cbmlink default to decimal. So to SAVE a ML program located at $7000 to $7FFF in the PET, one uses the command:
cbmlink –c pc64 0x378 –s,28672,32768 name.prg
Or you can explicitly reference hex:
cbmlink –c pc64 0x378 –s,0x7000,0x8000 name.prg

I transferred several 4K test files with test patterns to see if the data arrived correctly and it seems fine. Overall, it looks like a very good way to transfer files between the PET and a PC.

tezza
October 7th, 2009, 04:05 PM
Thanks for reporting Dave. That's useful stuff.

Tez

cosam
October 7th, 2009, 11:51 PM
Nice write-up, Dave.

Which version of Windows did you use? I remember that at least in XP you can't normally address the parallel port directly from userspace. I'm not sure this is an issue for cbmlink, but there are tools to "fix" this if it is.

I don't remember the type-in program being all that short when I last tried it. There are some programs which can supposedly translate BASIC code in ASCII into a .PRG, but I never got any of them to work. However, copy-pasting the code into VICE does work! I saved the result to a virtual tape and used audiotap to make a real one which loaded perfectly on my PET.

dave_m
October 8th, 2009, 07:03 AM
Which version of Windows did you use? I remember that at least in XP you can't normally address the parallel port directly from userspace. I'm not sure this is an issue for cbmlink, but there are tools to "fix" this if it is.

Very good point. I used Windows98 on an old computer. I'll update the writeup to mention it.



However, copy-pasting the code into VICE does work! I saved the result to a virtual tape and used audiotap to make a real one which loaded perfectly on my PET.

Nice, very clever.
-Dave

gsteemso
October 21st, 2009, 12:43 PM
Hello all,

I was hoping Anders would post contact information or some such for that guy he mentioned (on page one of this thread) who had preassembled C2N232 units. Does anyone know if he still has any available? Iíd _really_ like one, but I have no means of soldering very small connections, so I canít assemble one myself.

G.

carlsson
October 21st, 2009, 10:13 PM
Sorry, I have forgotten. Anyway the person I was going to contact will only sell the adapter in kit form. You would need to do the SMD soldering yourself, or find someone to do it for you. This is due to relatively new laws/regulations within the European Union which makes it very hard and expensive for someone to sell ready-made electronics devices. Kits you assemble yourself does not (yet) fall under the same regulations.

garypackwood
December 9th, 2009, 08:41 AM
Hi. Where can I buy a C2N232 adapter?

carlsson
December 9th, 2009, 10:21 PM
Oh.. time flies and I still haven't asked. Upon a closer look, the C2N232I is mentioned on his own homepage so I could just as well post a link to Nicolas page:
http://www.x1541.de/

Please note those adapters most likely would be sold in kit form and require SMD abilities to be assembled. Possibly there is someone elsewhere who would be willing to assemble a number of those, but I don't know.

dave_m
December 20th, 2009, 12:51 PM
This is due to relatively new laws/regulations within the European Union which makes it very hard and expensive for someone to sell ready-made electronics devices. Kits you assemble yourself does not (yet) fall under the same regulations.

Anders,
Is this due to the very strict regulations/certifications about using lead free solder in electronics? Or is there some other reason like product safety, etc?
-Dave

carlsson
December 20th, 2009, 11:16 PM
I think it all boils down to that the manufacturer is required to pay for and handle recycled products. You need to apply for a license which may even cost a lot of money to be a qualified producer and seller of electronics, but I haven't studied it further in detail.

dave_m
March 5th, 2010, 04:28 PM
I am the new owner of a Model 2040 dual floppy IEEE 488 drive for my Model 8032 PET. The disk has been updated with DOS 2 ROMs. It seems to work fine although I only have the performance test program meant for a 1541 single drive and so can only thoroughly test drive zero, but both drives seem OK. I can ďNewĒ the floppies (format) and read and write files.

Here is my problem. I tried to transfer disk file data from the 2040 to a PC via the cbmlink software and it does not seem to work. I also tried to copy a complete image in d64 format with no success. In fact cbmlink seems to do nothing except Ďhangí the PET when this is attempted. Cbmlink has commands for disk transfer but they donít seem to work on the PET. Are the disk commands for the Commodore 64 and the 1541 type drives only?

Has anyone successfully transferred data to/from a 2040 or 4040 drive using cbmlink?
I tried using no track numbers (default) and using 1 to 35 tracks for images to no avail. I think I may be missing something.
-Dave

cosam
March 6th, 2010, 03:55 PM
I've written images to a PET's 8050 using cmblink, but I can't for the life of me remember how. Maybe if you run us through the steps you took it'll bring something back. Does your procedure for transferring individual files still work and how does a disk transfer differ?

BTW: Is d64 the right format for 2040 images? I remember there was some messing about involved trying to generate d80 images for the 8050.

dave_m
March 6th, 2010, 09:05 PM
I've written images to a PET's 8050 using cmblink, but I can't for the life of me remember how. Maybe if you run us through the steps you took it'll bring something back. Does your procedure for transferring individual files still work and how does a disk transfer differ?
Hi Steve,
When I first used cbmlink, I did not have a disk so I only needed it to transfer program code from the PC to PET memory as vice versa. That works fine with the -l (load) and -s (save).
But now I tried the File Read command (-fr switch) which I thought would transfer a disk file from the 2040 (connected to the PET) through to the PC.


BTW: Is d64 the right format for 2040 images? I remember there was some messing about involved trying to generate d80 images for the 8050.
Here I was attempting to copy the whole diskette image to the PC as a .d64 file. The only examples in the instructions were for a .d64 file or as a binary file. This is done with a 'disk read' command -dr. The full command line I used was:
cbmlink -c pc64 0x378 -dr0, 3,1,35 FILE.D64
I specified disk unit zero, interleave of 3, track 1 to track 35. When this did not work, I used all defaults:

cbmlink -c pc64 0x378 -dr FILE.D64
This did not work either. The PET just hung up. When I reset the PET, the prompt on the PC came back. I was thinking that the PET diskette format is compatible with the 1541 disk drive? I need to do some more research on formats. I am glad to read that you had some success transferring data to an 8050 drive. That gives me some hope. Thanks, Dave

carlsson
March 7th, 2010, 10:17 PM
For what it is worth, in January I successfully read two floppy disks from a 8250LP drive. I used cbmlink with the C2N232I interface connected to a CBM 610 and a custom cartridge with code to enable the cassette port. As for your second question, 4040 floppy disks should be read compatible with a 1541 so you shouldn't have to take the detour around the PET to read those.

dave_m
March 8th, 2010, 09:09 AM
For what it is worth, in January I successfully read two floppy disks from a 8250LP drive.
Anders, if you were reading the full diskette image, do you remember if you specified the starting and stopping track numbers in the command line or did you leave them out?
Thanks, Dave

carlsson
March 8th, 2010, 11:06 AM
Actually I used Bill Degnan's CBMXfer, but I'm quite sure that program leaves the track numbers out. After all, the D80 format (in my case) should already have the tracks defined.

While I don't own a working 2040, 3040 or 4040, if you like I could take the trouble of attaching a 2031 to a PET and see if I can transfer files that way. Note however I would be using the C2N232I interface rather than PC64 like you seem to use.

dave_m
March 8th, 2010, 01:39 PM
While I don't own a working 2040, 3040 or 4040, if you like I could take the trouble of attaching a 2031 to a PET and see if I can transfer files that way. Note however I would be using the C2N232I interface rather than PC64 like you seem to use.

Anders,
Yes when you get a chance, please see if you can transfer a file from the disk drive to the PC and then perhaps a whole diskette image.

I'm still looking for a C2N232 cable as it seems more universally used.

Have you looked into the XU 1541 adapter that hooks up the 1541 drive to the USB of a more modern PC running WIN XP and OpenCBM software? I have a 1541 and am tempted to try this setup. If it worked, I think my PET 2040 drive could then read the diskette for transfer data to the PET that way.

carlsson
March 8th, 2010, 01:49 PM
No, I haven't considered the XU1541 since I have enough transfer cables and devices as it is, and almost all my PC's have onboard parallel ports anyway. Of course I have a classic XM1541 cable that goes to a 1541-II. I have previously used that setup to write 35 track floppy disks read on the 2031 (connected to a CBM 710).

Panther
March 9th, 2010, 06:00 AM
I've written images to a PET's 8050 using cmblink, but I can't for the life of me remember how. Maybe if you run us through the steps you took it'll bring something back. Does your procedure for transferring individual files still work and how does a disk transfer differ?

BTW: Is d64 the right format for 2040 images? I remember there was some messing about involved trying to generate d80 images for the 8050.

I'd love to know how to do this !!

I got an XE1541 cable and 1541 drive before I found out that images written on a 1541 are not compatible with the 8050 :(

I've got loads of pet software as .d64 files and can't get any onto the PET, I have only managed one program (Cosmic Cosmiads) by recording to tapoe and then loading, but cause it's machine code I can't then save back to disk !!!

carlsson
March 9th, 2010, 06:54 AM
You need a different kind of cable. The recommended one is a PC64 cable (http://www.zimmers.net/anonftp/pub/cbm/crossplatform/transfer/C2N232/cbmlink.html#cable-pc64) which connects the PC to the PET and will turn the PET into a slave. But as mentioned above, Dave had some problems using this kind of setup.

cosam
March 9th, 2010, 07:13 AM
I've got loads of pet software as .d64 files and can't get any onto the PET, I have only managed one program (Cosmic Cosmiads) by recording to tapoe and then loading, but cause it's machine code I can't then save back to disk !!!

There are various tools for manipulating at least d64 images, maybe even d80s, but I had the most success using VICE. The d64 can be attached as one drive and you can simply copy .PRGs over to a virtual 8x50 drive with a blank d80 attached. As far as I can remember the transfer of the d80 to a real disk was just a matter of following the cbmlink documentation.

And yes, you need the PC64 cable: DB25 at one end and PET user port edge connector at the other. Not hard to make (the pinout is in the cbmlink docs) but I did have a job finding a suitable edge connector.

dave_m
March 9th, 2010, 11:05 AM
I got an XE1541 cable and 1541 drive before I found out that images written on a 1541 are not compatible with the 8050

I am a little luckier I think because the 2040 is read compatible with the 1541 drive so I have more options.



I have only managed one program (Cosmic Cosmiads) by recording to tape and then loading, but cause it's machine code I can't then
save back to disk !!!

You should be able to do this if you are at all familiar with the machine language monitor that is built into ROM. From a fresh load from tape, go into the machine language monitor with a sys 1024. Using the memory display command (.m), check from 0401H in blocks of around 0800H untill you find some code (non hex AA pattern). That is the start of the program. Record that address. Then keep going until the code ends (hex AA pattern starts again). Record the end address. At this point you have the information the save the program to disk. Use the SAVE command (.s) with the following syntax:

.s "0:name_of_program",08,start address in hex,end address in hex

Use exit command (.x) to get back to BASIC.
If you are not familiar with the monitor program, go to this link:

http://generalthomas.com/PET/BATPRO_Ref.pdf

and check p.60 for info on the memory display command, and p.62 for info on the save command. Some of the other commands listed need a Batpro EPROM but these are OK without it.

Right at the moment I am having a hard time with the pc64 cable trying to transfer files to/from my PET 2040 disk using cbmlink but I hope it is just cockpit errors. You may have better luck with the 8050.
-Dave

Panther
March 11th, 2010, 12:15 AM
dave_m,

Many thanks for the tips, I'll give it a go as soon as I get chance, I've also enquired with a friend who's alot better than me with a soldering iron to see if he can construct a PC64 cable !!

Stu.

sjgray
March 12th, 2010, 02:42 PM
Actually I used Bill Degnan's CBMXfer, but I'm quite sure that program leaves the track numbers out. After all, the D80 format (in my case) should already have the tracks defined.

Anders, I'm hurt... you don't remember who wrote CBMXfer :-( LOL

Actually, as far as I can tell cbmlink continues until it gets an error on sector 0 of the current track. It increments the sectors until there is an error then moves to the next track, and when it gets an error on sector 0 it assumes it's done. I recently tried transferring a disk and it just gave up after a couple tracks with no error. Of course the banging noise told me there was an error, and the file size of the D80 was way too small.

Currently CBMXfer doesn't check the result but it's something I plan on implementing at some point.

Steve

carlsson
March 12th, 2010, 03:04 PM
Haha. Can you spell brainfart? Sorry, of course it should say Steve Gray's CBMXfer.

dave_m
March 17th, 2010, 11:41 AM
Anders/Steve,
I am getting nowhere with transfers to/from the 2040 disk drive (connected to a PET) and the PC using cbmlink via pc64 cable. The PET 8032 hangs up with no disk activity or lights. I am thinking of trying CBMXfer in case I am using the wrong syntax somehow with cbmlink and let it talk to cbmlink.

As a backup I have ordered a XM1541 cable from a company in Europe and, in a month or so when it arrives, hope to communicate with a 1541 drive (of unknown operational status) and the PC.

Then I could sneaker-net (walk) diskettes to the 2040 drive. And since 1541 drives are supposed to be read compatible with 2040/4040 PET drives, I should be able to load programs into the PET. And finally write the files back on 2040 formatted diskettes. What a process that will be as I had better remember to initalize the diskettes properly when I switch diskettes for writing or the diskette can become corrupted.

One problem may be how to format diskettes on the 1541 from the PC (I do not have a C64). Does any transfer software help with this issue? I do have a few old C64 diskettes but I would like to use new diskettes.
-Dave

carlsson
March 17th, 2010, 03:57 PM
Yes, OpenCBM (cbm4win, cbm4linux) includes formatting commands. Actually the 1541 is an intelligent device so you just send the command "go format yourself" and off the drive goes to format itself.

I will try to remember to conduct some more tests, but I fear either your PET is partly broken (bad VIA?) or your PC64 cable is not correctly made. Well, it could be your PC has a non-compatible parallel port too, something you will find out sooner or later after receiving the XM1541 cable. However your PC should be of a quite odd model in order for it to fail. Perhaps you can look it up or even better try another PC if you have one to make sure the problem does not lie on that side?

dave_m
March 17th, 2010, 09:55 PM
Anders,
OK good things to check. However my parallel port in on my WIN98 Toshiba laptop (Pentium II type) so while the port should be compatible, I don't think I can use OpenCBM to format as it works on XP class machines.

If you saw my pc64 cable, you would worry about shorts, but it does work for load and save commands (transfers to/from the PC to the PET RAM). But I'd better check the wiring. I may yet have to switch to the XU1541 USB cable so I can use OpenCBM with my WIN-XP machine.
Thanks, Dave

carlsson
March 17th, 2010, 10:47 PM
The XM1541 cable will work with Star Commander in pure MS-DOS. As far as I remember there is no software that runs natively in Windows 98, with the exception to running Star Commander in a command window and cross your fingers it will work.

dave_m
March 18th, 2010, 06:48 AM
The XM1541 cable will work with Star Commander in pure MS-DOS.
That's good to know. That should be easy for me to try.



As far as I remember there is no software that runs natively in Windows 98, with the exception to running Star Commander in a command window and cross your fingers it will work.

I will double check, but I think the cbmlink documentation says their windows version will work on Windows 98.

carlsson
March 18th, 2010, 07:47 AM
I'm unsure to what extent cbmlink supports the X-series cables, but in any case I would expect it to connect to a computer in the other end rather than a floppy drive. However I'll admit I never investigated what it can do. Perhaps you are familiar with the 64HDD software, which lets you connect a MS-DOS PC to a Commodore computer and use the PC like a virtual floppy/hard drive. That is far from your intended use, but it goes to show the IEC bus just as well lets you connect two computers together as one computer and one storage/printing device.

dave_m
June 28th, 2010, 08:18 PM
The XM1541 cable will work with Star Commander in pure MS-DOS.

Anders,
I purchased an XM1541 cable from Europe and hooked it up to a DOS PC and a CBM 1541 Disk Drive. With Star Commander, it works like a champ. I am able to transfer files to and from the floppies and the PC. The user interface seems a bit odd, but it works.

Then I am able to LOAD the file into my 8032 PET via the Model 2040 IEEE drive which is ďread compatibleĒ with the 1541. I then place a 2040 formatted floppy into the drive, initialize the drive to make sure the BAM is updated, and finally SAVE the file to the 2040 diskette.

It is a bit cumbersome, but for me, it seems more reliable than the cmblink/pc64 cable method which has a habit of hanging-up too often.
-Dave

Raven
June 29th, 2010, 12:26 PM
Can someone show me where these cheap plentiful Datasettes are? I can't find any here for less than $40, and most of them go for $70 or so - quite expensive if you ask me, and my Datasette is dead.

Disregard this post - I didn't see that there are many pages and the comments about plentiful Datasettes are from 2009.

carlsson
June 29th, 2010, 02:24 PM
Raven, if you like I can try to dig up a C2N and send to you for shipping costs. However since I'm overseas, it probably will get quite expensive. I can't believe they should be that expensive on the US market, but perhaps the early shift to floppy drives means less Datassettes were sold and remain than the situation is over here in Europe. Many of us European collectors are flooded in tape recorders, like for every new computer we obtain, we get two more Datassettes.

On regard of the C2N232, I had a long bout tonight but failed most operation. I can load simple files, but the cbmlink communication is intermittent. :-( I don't know what is wrong, but it is quite frustrating.

mark66j
June 29th, 2010, 03:59 PM
Can someone show me where these cheap plentiful Datasettes are? I can't find any here for less than $40, and most of them go for $70 or so - quite expensive if you ask me, and my Datasette is dead.

Disregard this post - I didn't see that there are many pages and the comments about plentiful Datasettes are from 2009.

I have a Datasette sitting in my attic that I'm not likely to use, and the shipping probably would be pretty small. It however may be a week or two before I can get up there to get it out.

carlsson
June 30th, 2010, 09:02 AM
C2N232 .. I can load simple files, but the cbmlink communication is intermittent.
Update: After switching from CBM 8032 and VIC-20 to using a CBM 710 (or a CBM 610 for that matter), it works much better. Those CBM-II computers have a cassette port but no ROM support to use it. I wonder if it means less routines may interfer with the cbmlink process. I gotta try a bit later, but for now the CBM-II are my 8250 gateways. :-)

dave_m
June 30th, 2010, 01:03 PM
Update: After switching from CBM 8032 and VIC-20 to using a CBM 710 (or a CBM 610 for that matter), it works much better. Those CBM-II computers have a cassette port but no ROM support to use it. I wonder if it means less routines may interfer with the cbmlink process. I gotta try a bit later, but for now the CBM-II are my 8250 gateways. :-)

Anders,
As best as I can guess, when the CBM utility (plain.prg) is launched (it loads in high memory), it operates as a daemon (background process) by wedging itself into the system timer interrupt chain which allows it to 'come alive' on a periodic basis and monitor for cbmlink commands from the PC. When it 'springs into action' based on commands from the PC, perhaps infrequently it can interfere with the CBM operations based on random or asynchronous activity, who knows. The code is good but not bullet proof although the concept seems sound to me.
-Dave

carlsson
June 30th, 2010, 02:39 PM
No idea. I've exchanged messages with my friend and the program's author Marko. He mentioned something about 16550 serial ports could cause problems, but I don't know if that is the case. However I wonder if the automated bootstrap method using c2nload is the optimum one. Perhaps it would work better if I save the server part to floppy disk or cartridge and load/run it locally instead of bootstrapping it.