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machine
May 5th, 2005, 10:34 AM
Also here is another website which describes an Australian 'totalisator' machine from the 1920's.

http://members.ozemail.com.au/~bconlon/

The machine was used for calculating race results and were sold all over the world.

There's some nice pics on the site of the huge machine.

Here's a quote from that website:

"Doron Swade writes in his New Scientist magazine article dated 29 October 1987 titled A Sure Bet For Understanding Computers with reference to the London Science Museum. The Julius totalisator with its automatic odds machine is the earliest on-line, real-time, data processing and computation system that the curators at the Science Museum have identified so far."

The Julius totalisator organisation eventually became the Automatic Totalisator Limited (ATL) company.

ATL invested heavily in computers when it became obvious that an electronic method of calculating race results was faster.

The ATL company merged with AWA (Amalgamated Wireless Australasia) in the 90's and AWA finally died in the late 90's.

CP/M User
April 24th, 2006, 03:25 PM
machine wrote:

> Also here is another website which describes an
> Australian 'totalisator' machine from the 1920's.

Interesting machine, does anyone know how well it predicted
the results?

CP/M User.

Terry Yager
April 24th, 2006, 04:28 PM
100% accuracy, of course. Everybody knows that computers don't make mistakes. (Still, sometimes the ponies would not be very co-operative with the projected results).

--T

CP/M User
April 24th, 2006, 09:46 PM
Terry Yager wrote:

> 100% accuracy, of course. Everybody knows that
> computers don't make mistakes. (Still, sometimes the
> ponies would not be very co-operative with the
> projected results).

Course I should have realised, it's always the beasts fault -
like the old saying goes "You can lead a horse to water, but
you can't make them drink it".

But just suppose what would happen if the Moth incident
happened earlier than what it did?

CP/M User.

Marius Titulescu
October 8th, 2015, 12:00 PM
Computers don't make mistakes but I can't see any way one can predict results with no standard deviation.
____________________________________
Marius
totalizator PMC (http://www.pari-mutuel-computing.com/en/Central-system.html)