PDA

View Full Version : Yahoo offers 1gb mailbox



joe sixpack
May 5th, 2005, 06:19 PM
this might be old news but i've just now seen the jump on my account
yahoo now gives 1gb mailbox's

did a search and found a souce however they date the anoucement march 22
funny i have not heard anything about it.
http://news.com.com/Yahoo+bolsters+e-mail+storage+to+1GB/2100-1032_3-5630773.html

Erik
May 5th, 2005, 06:41 PM
Google upped their mailboxes to 2GB recently and have said that they will continue to up the limits as people use the service.

I'm not sure it matters, though. Most people don't packrat email and those of us who do like to store it locally! :)

Erik

joe sixpack
May 5th, 2005, 06:52 PM
ya i had heard about google it's about the only mail service you hear about
but im a bit supprised i did'nt know yahoo was boosting the mailbox's
at any rate the source article said 2 weeks i just now seen my box go up.
my first thought was this will be a good way to store files i need to use
or send a lot.

i dont plan to ever use google's gmail.. if i do it will only be to abuse it, F***'em hard. :twisted:
the whole invite thing is bull #@*$ i dont want any part in it.
they say it's because of being beta but thats crap as they give already
members a crap load of invites and there's no real screening process
i like there search engine but i have a feeling google will turn sinister sooner or later.

machine
June 28th, 2005, 03:35 PM
Gmail accounts are now 2.337 Gb and increasing daily. Google said they'd just keep on increasing it.

I suppose that is one way to keep ahead of your competitors. Yahoo responded by going to 1 Gb. But a Yahoo mail account is considered 'low-class'.

I have been using my Gmail account to place backups of my important files.

CP/M User
June 28th, 2005, 03:52 PM
"machine" wrote:

> Gmail accounts are now 2.337 Gb and increasing daily. Google said
> they'd just keep on increasing it.

> I suppose that is one way to keep ahead of your competitors. Yahoo
> responded by going to 1 Gb. But a Yahoo mail account is
> considered 'low-class'.

> I have been using my Gmail account to place backups of my important
> files.

Initially I tried getting a Gmail thingo', but they denied me, now the shoe is on the other foot - so I just deny getting one, only because I had a Google Groups account - but aparantly that didn't make any difference as to why I wanted a Gmail account!

So when I signed up for some Geocities Webspace - they gave me a yahoo account - with that 1Gb compacity. But why do they have to give me a measly 20Mb of Webspace? I'd much rather have 1Gb of Free Webspace (but that would make it too easy wouldn't it?!) for my Images - instead of Uploading them to Imageshack(tm). Oh well - better than nothing! ;-)

CP/M User.

joe sixpack
June 29th, 2005, 01:58 PM
But a Yahoo mail account is considered 'low-class'.
how do you figure that?

CP/M User
June 29th, 2005, 07:33 PM
"machine" wrote:

>> But a Yahoo mail account is considered 'low-class'.

"joe sixpack" wrote:

> how do you figure that?

Yeah, I was wonderning about that too! Since I've set this account up, I've got no spam in it. Must admit though that some of the other forum e-mailers made it think I was being spammed.

The only other thing I can think of is that people in the past abused the yahoo e-mail system & as a result a number of ISPs were designed to block Yahoo e-mail - only because some group abused it, but I think it maybe better controled nowadays.

CP/M User.

Terry Yager
June 29th, 2005, 09:38 PM
The only other thing I can think of is that people in the past abused the yahoo e-mail system & as a result a number of ISPs were designed to block Yahoo e-mail - only because some group abused it, but I think it maybe better controled nowadays.

CP/M User.

That's true, some ISPs do block Yahoo mail, but I think what JS meant is that certain snobbish people look upon a Yahoo account with disdain, like it ain't worthy or thier high standards. But then again, who cares what those idjits think?

--T

CP/M User
June 29th, 2005, 10:47 PM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> That's true, some ISPs do block Yahoo mail, but I think what JS meant
> is that certain "snobbish" people look upon a Yahoo account with
> disdain, like it ain't worthy or thier "high standards". But then again,
> who cares what those "idjits" think?

Sorry, JS wasn't referning to Yahoo as "Low Class", Machine initally mentioned this.

I'll change my previous thread to reflect who said what.

CP/M User.

carlsson
June 30th, 2005, 01:29 AM
I don't know if Yahoo ranks any lower than Hotmail, or AOL for that matter, when it comes to spamming and other matters. However, I know that Yahoo has a dog slow email system when it comes to signing up for new accounts, new groups and things like that. To wait an hour to get the email may be reasonable, but sometimes it took a whole day or even more. One would think the confirmation email got lost and will try to resend it, but eventually it trickles in.

No idea if GMail or other providers get their outgoing mail faster to other parties though. I know that the fault was not on my side, as I in the mean time received plenty of email from other places.

CP/M User
June 30th, 2005, 04:27 AM
"carlsson" wrote:

> I don't know if Yahoo ranks any lower than Hotmail, or AOL for that
> matter, when it comes to spamming and other matters. However, I
> know that Yahoo has a dog slow email system when it comes to signing
> up for new accounts, new groups and things like that. To wait an hour to
> get the email may be reasonable, but sometimes it took a whole day or
> even more. One would think the confirmation email got lost and will try
> to resend it, but eventually it trickles in.

> No idea if GMail or other providers get their outgoing mail faster to
> other parties though. I know that the fault was not on my side, as I in
> the mean time received plenty of email from other places.

Personally, I haven't tested my Yahoo mail account thoughtly enough to notice any time fallouts with e-mail. I used to think that e-mail was this wonderful system where mail is received when it's sent & visa-versa. But now I'm not so sure, occasionally with the regular e-mail system I use, I get e-mails from locals here which are recived at odd-hours of the night! They thought I was mad when I ask them if I'd been up all hours sending e-mails - even though I got someone from perhaps a forum or just overseas in general who checks his e-mails throughout the night (sleeping in between naturally) & replies to them all. Sometimes you can tell though. One e-mail came from my mates business through the night - so I knew then that he didn't send it then, though when I asked about it, he said there's a delay in sending external e-mail!

I used to think the e-mail was a bit better at getting stuff imediately, but perhaps the traffic on the internet is slowing this process? (mearly a quess).

CP/M User.

Terry Yager
June 30th, 2005, 05:38 AM
Yesterday, my g/f sent me an SOS email from her work. Seems her electric window got stuck in the open position, and it was pouring rain, so she wanted me to come and see if I could help. The email was sent from her .gov account at around 5pm, and it was delivered to my .net account at around 9pm last nite, way too late to do any good.

--T

Terry Yager
June 30th, 2005, 06:12 AM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> That's true, some ISPs do block Yahoo mail, but I think what JS meant
> is that certain "snobbish" people look upon a Yahoo account with
> disdain, like it ain't worthy or thier "high standards". But then again,
> who cares what those "idjits" think?

Sorry, JS wasn't referning to Yahoo as "Low Class", Machine initally mentioned this.

I'll change my previous thread to reflect who said what.

CP/M User.

Oh, sorry Joe.

--T

joe sixpack
June 30th, 2005, 06:36 PM
no prob Terry,

I have had one yahoo account or another for 5 or 6 years.
I use to have problems with late emails but i've not had that problem
for some time.. year or so. A lot of places use to block yahoo not
sure if they still do or not i've not had my email blocked for a while.
It's a shame people always look to abuse free service.

I remember when they offered free pop3 access with there accounts now
you have to pay for that.

btw anyone noticed some ISP's blocking access to SMTP servers?
Total BS if you ask me, But thats another subject.
I can'nt believe the problems we have caused with email.. it's such a simple system.

carlsson
June 30th, 2005, 11:16 PM
When it comes to SOS and other acute issues, I would rather make a phone call than sending an e-mail. I don't know if it is heavy load, policy or an unfortunate path of routers to cross that make some e-mails take hours to deliver while other take less than a second (yes, I've experienced that and it was e-mail to a different country).

Regarding SMTP servers, the idea is that you should use the outgoing server of your ISP. Some servers have the option to login or give a special password to access it, but it is difficult for your ISP to determine if they should let you have access to a specific external SMTP or not. Of course it is for spam and virus issues there have been more restrictions on not being able to send e-mail through a random server on the outside.

The only good reason I've heard of to require access to a different SMTP is in the case you want authority on your outgoing e-mail by saying that all my e-mail is being sent by this server, which is configured in such a way that no-one else can have access to it and use my sender address. Those of you who have been playing with e-mail hacking know how relatively easy it is to spoof sender address and many other issues. If you in that case are forced to use a common SMTP server, there still lies a risk that someone else (on the same network) pretends to be you and send out false e-mail. Otherwise I have a hard time to come up with a good reason why you should be able to contact someone else's SMTP server directly instead of letting your ISP's server transport the message. Maybe Joe can give me a very good reason?

joe sixpack
July 1st, 2005, 09:35 PM
When it comes to SOS and other acute issues, I would rather make a phone call than sending an e-mail. I don't know if it is heavy load, policy or an unfortunate path of routers to cross that make some e-mails take hours to deliver while other take less than a second (yes, I've experienced that and it was e-mail to a different country).

Regarding SMTP servers, the idea is that you should use the outgoing server of your ISP. Some servers have the option to login or give a special password to access it, but it is difficult for your ISP to determine if they should let you have access to a specific external SMTP or not. Of course it is for spam and virus issues there have been more restrictions on not being able to send e-mail through a random server on the outside.

The only good reason I've heard of to require access to a different SMTP is in the case you want authority on your outgoing e-mail by saying that all my e-mail is being sent by this server, which is configured in such a way that no-one else can have access to it and use my sender address. Those of you who have been playing with e-mail hacking know how relatively easy it is to spoof sender address and many other issues. If you in that case are forced to use a common SMTP server, there still lies a risk that someone else (on the same network) pretends to be you and send out false e-mail. Otherwise I have a hard time to come up with a good reason why you should be able to contact someone else's SMTP server directly instead of letting your ISP's server transport the message. Maybe Joe can give me a very good reason?

we talked about this a few months ago. anyway most SMTP's
nowa days wont let you send your email unless it is tagged as coming from
and returning to your own account. so for example:
if i try to send a email using my ISP's SMTP smtp.bigisp.com
and the msg is taged as comming from and returning too joesixpack@oddballserver.com the smtp will reject it.
This is not always the case but a lot of servers are being setup this
way now days. flip side is a open relay. With a open relay you can send
email even if you do not have an account. pretty much no rules.
Of course the smaller isps are lot less strict on there SMTP use.
With webmail all the rage these days POP3/SMTP is becoming less and less
important for the typical user to access. I make it a point not to use
any services from my ISP. they provide the connect i'll do the rest.
But the biggest reason i want access to outside SMTP's is I PAID FOR IT.
I pay for a connection to the internet. What i do with it is my business.
A lot of ISP's in the fine print say you can't run any type of server, ping is a 4 letter word.
and some even have parts in there about having the right to penetration test your system.
Not to mention the rights they give them self to collect information.
WoW for example use to have it in there contract that they could keep your records for up to
15 years after you are no longer a customer. Road Runner gives them selves
the right to limit your access to the service if they deem you to be using
to much bandwidth in any way they seem fit without prior notice. lol nice!
Just take a few hours to read the fine print you would be supprised what they sneak in there.
I've not had any problems from my ISP they are rather good in the overall but
the minute they try to stop me from what i want to do they are gone
toast outta here i dont pay them to lip off to me.

carlsson
July 5th, 2005, 01:28 PM
if i try to send a email using my ISP's SMTP smtp.bigisp.com and the msg is taged as comming from and returning too joesixpack@oddballserver.com the smtp will reject it.
Ok. Poorly configured SMTP, as was my conclusion last time too, IIRC. Those home ISP's I've encountered seem to filter outgoing on IP address rather than e-mail domain.


some even have parts in there about having the right to penetration test your system.
Wow. That is something I've never seen in the fine print. On the other hand, it is not only home ISP's who have strange conditions. Some cheap web hotels also have been reported to suddently shutting off paying customers when the hotel decides the user has exceeded a limit, even in the case where it is clear that no file or transfer quotas were exceeded. It only appears like the hotel wants the customer to upgrade to a larger capacity in the middle of contract. In particular if you're (legally!) doing small business within your web hotel space, some providers seem eager to catch you. Almost maffia methods.