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View Full Version : what is this Amiga 600 going to do for me and my longevity?



Chris2005
May 20th, 2005, 12:24 PM
I know nothing about Amigas. Are they still useful for anything these days? I read somewhere online that the 600 was no slouch, not inferior to the 500 anyway.

vic user
May 22nd, 2005, 03:15 AM
i know very little about amigas.

from what i gather, there is still a huge amount of people all around the world that use them.

you might want to try amiga.com and go from there.

always wanted one myself!

chris

Terry Yager
May 22nd, 2005, 07:37 AM
I knew a guy (now deceased) who ran an Amiga BBS all the way up into the late ninties, long after all the other BBSs had disappeared. His large membership was world-wide, and none seemed to mind the LD charges to log-on, probably because it was a "pirate" board where you could obtain any Amiga program you wanted, commercial or otherwise.

--T

Jorg
May 22nd, 2005, 08:19 AM
AFAIK there is still a huge amiga community around

http://www.amiga.org/modules/mylinks/viewcat.php?cid=12

Unknown_K
May 23rd, 2005, 02:10 AM
Do a google search for EAB (English Amiga Board), its very active in the Amiga comunity.

As far as the A600 goes, not too many people like that model. The A500 is better for playing non AGA games plus it has a full keyboard.

Chris2005
May 24th, 2005, 12:08 PM
personally I'd prefer a 500 also, or a 2000. But one thing the 600 does have going for it...it's the latest model, and not likely to have as much use.

carlsson
May 24th, 2005, 11:22 PM
Two things going for the Amiga 600: it has a PCMCIA slot and if I recall correctly, also a 2.5" IDE interface. On the other hand, it has one fewer external expansion possibilities than the A500+ and no numeric keypad. Compatibily wise, the A500+ (ECS chipset) and A600 should be close to identical.

Just like the Commodore 16, the Amiga 600 is a model I never quite liked or understood the motives behind. Surely people have found use of it, and probably it was a test bed for the upcoming AGA enhanced Amiga 1200, but considering how soon after the Amiga 500+ model it was released, with no ground breaking improvements, it only confused a potential buyer.

Chris2005
May 26th, 2005, 04:23 PM
I thought the 500 also took 2.5" ide drives. :?:

Unknown_K
May 26th, 2005, 05:04 PM
The A1200 and A600 took internal 2.5" IDE notebook drives.

The A500 needed an external (still somewhat expensive) sidecar with scsi controller and room to mount a 3.5" scsi HD and on some models extra ram too.

Chris2005
June 1st, 2005, 08:04 PM
In terms of logical progression, a Macintosh is the next step after an Amiga. But then there's the SGI stuff. Has any of you old Amiga users moved on to something like that? Hey this is a vintage forum. And the SGI stuff is getting pretty cheap these days. Keep in mind though, Linux (if anyone wanted to know) won't run on the Purple IMPACT 10000 Indigo 2 systems. You're stuck with IRIX. Whether or not it'll ever be ported, who knows.
I just thought I'd ask because I picked up a heap of old SGI stuff. Don't quite have an operating system yet though. Need IRIX - anyone got it for sale?

Kaptain Skitzo
June 2nd, 2005, 04:58 AM
The A1200 and A600 took internal 2.5" IDE notebook drives.

The A500 needed an external (still somewhat expensive) sidecar with scsi controller and room to mount a 3.5" scsi HD and on some models extra ram too.

Actually, there was a card you could plug onto the A500's motherboard called "Ad-IDE" and replace the internal floppy drive with an IDE Hard disk. I picked it up on the cheap, but never actually installed it...so I really don't even know if mine works.
Personally, I think the A600 came out much too late to be of much use. I heard there are some compatability issues, but since I never used one...I can't verify that.

carlsson
June 2nd, 2005, 12:32 PM
Yes, the 600 came too late, or put in other words: the 1200, 4000 and CD32 should have come when the 500+, 3000 and 600 came. It may have been technically impossible (unless development of a new graphics chip was not initiated earlier), but imagine such a market leader the 1200/CD32 could have become in early winter 1992, or at least for the summer.

As far as I'm concerned, Commodore Amiga once was the market leader around 1986-89. Then came more powerful Intels, VGA, SoundBlaster, Windows etc and Amiga sadly fell behind. When the AGA generation was ready to be introduced in 1993, the rest of the world were moving to 486DX or better, SVGA and so on. Only Amiga owners would be really thrilled with new Amigas. CD32 had competition from CD-i, Sega Mega-CD and so on, and one and a half year later Sony PlayStation killed them all. Maybe another year on the market for the Amiga console would not have made a difference, given that Commodore was going down by then.

Kaptain Skitzo
June 2nd, 2005, 03:57 PM
Yeah, Carlsson....the more powerfull intel machines were rolling out sporting their faster processors...but the OS helped bog the machine down so badly that they actually ran about 1/10th of their touted clock speed....at best. The problem was partially in the American consumer(I can honestly say that...since I am one :oops: )...Americans saw "200 Megahurtz" and thought, "WHOA! That's FAST! Why should I buy this expensive 25 Megahurtz machine, when I can get a 200 Mhz machine for SO much less money!?" Functionality didn't matter worth a damn. I know people who owned BOTH systems(a moderately stocked Amiga 3000 or 1200 and a fully loaded 266 Mhz P-I with Windows 95)...and they swore that the Amiga still had the speed advantage....and had run benchmark tests to prove it.
Something else that helped kill the Amiga, was some rather dirty tactics from M$. I know for a fact that some deals were made with computer stores(chains, of course) to "buy" shelf space for M$ compatable software only. Of course, this was done "legally"...but it amounts to the same thing.
It left little shelf space for Mac and Amiga software to be displayed/sold...the lower the margin for the "competition", the higher the "payoff".

BTW- I've been meaning to ask you, do you use a translation program to read the forums, or are you fluent in English? I'm curious, because I know that most European countries have moved to bi-lingual...so it's a toss up. It doesn't matter, I'm just the curious type. :D

Unknown_K
June 2nd, 2005, 04:13 PM
x86 machines cost less then the Amiga and Apple machines of the day. There were dozens of companies developing hardware and software for x86 (open platform), much more then for Apple and Amiga.


Dominance in computers comes about by a large user base, not from better technology or OS.

Erik
June 2nd, 2005, 05:04 PM
x86 machines cost less then the Amiga and Apple machines of the day. There were dozens of companies developing hardware and software for x86 (open platform), much more then for Apple and Amiga.

Dominance in computers comes about by a large user base, not from better technology or OS.

The main reason for this, and the thing that Apple forgot, is that an open architecture is the easiest way to get a lot of folks making stuff for your platform and a lot more folks using it.

E

Unknown_K
June 4th, 2005, 10:42 AM
A completely open architecture is a good way to lose your platform to some other company (like IBM lost out to Compaq and a long line of others).

Apple would have beat out IBM if their prices were lower even if they kept the hardware proprietary. The IBM PC did not realy catch on untill the cloners came about and started dropping prices because of competition. People love Mercedes but most buy Fords.

Once the buying public has made clear the winning platform (simple sales distributions), everybody else (hardware and software venders) jumps on board.

Erik
June 6th, 2005, 07:33 AM
A completely open architecture is a good way to lose your platform to some other company (like IBM lost out to Compaq and a long line of others).

IBM still did fine against Compaq and others. If anything the clones helped IBM sell more machines.

It wasn't until they came out with the PS/2 line and closed the architecture of the MCA that they started slipping. In the end they got burned by the same bad idea.


Apple would have beat out IBM if their prices were lower even if they kept the hardware proprietary. The IBM PC did not realy catch on untill the cloners came about and started dropping prices because of competition. People love Mercedes but most buy Fords.

But enough buy Mercedes to keep them in business, right? Not that the analogy follows through that strongly.

But you do remind me of another Apple failing (followed again by IBM) - overcharging for machines. There's something to be said for charging a premium for quality, but overpricing will always kill you in the end.

E

Terry Yager
June 6th, 2005, 11:13 AM
IBM may have screwed up badly with the whole MCA thing, but they redeemed themselves in the 90's with the best-selling line of laptops ever. They have made a pretty good comeback, but may have blown it again by selling off the ThinkPad business, only time will tell.

--T

Kaptain Skitzo
June 6th, 2005, 03:38 PM
It's still sad though, because back in the day, Commodore ruled the roost in home computers. The C=64 is STILL listed as the top selling model computer of all time....and given the state of advancement these days, will remain so for the foreseeable future. I really wish someone would take a poll and find out how many of the units are still in use today. That would be a pretty interesting statistic, don't you think?
Especially given the fact that many programmers took it way beyond what was thought(by the designers) was possible.

carlsson
June 8th, 2005, 06:51 AM
Americans saw "200 Megahurtz"
Not until 1995-96, if my memory serves me right. By then, there was no Amiga anymore. :(

do you use a translation program to read the forums, or are you fluent in English?
Feh. It would take ages to use a translation program. Maybe if I encounter some important message in German, French, Spanish etc. Sometimes I use a dictionary to look up words I don't know, forgot spelling or are unsure if they mean what I think they mean..

We study English in elementary school for seven years (when I went there, today it is nine years IIRC) plus up to three years in gymnasium, which is something inbetween high school and college. Of course you can continue with language studies in the university too, but I only took one course in Technical English from which I didn't learn so much other than getting exercise in writing e.g. technical reports.

Kaptain Skitzo
June 8th, 2005, 04:08 PM
Actually, the Amiga's were still around here in the states(via die-hards) until about 2001. It was a niche market, but a viable one none-the-less. I've recently heard of the Amiga-One being produced....though I believe the support for this machine is VERY hard to come by(if it exists at all). Even though Commodore went belly up in 1993/4(can't remember which, at this point), there was still support for it, by 3rd party companies, as well as ESCOM, GMBH(the German company that bought it). Of course, by then, it was too late. Like today, only die-hards are still on board.

I wasn't meaning to be insulting about the "language" question, and I hope you didn't take it that way. I know a bit more about Germany than other European countries, as my fiance' is from Germany...and from her, I know that English is a required language there. I wasn't sure about Sweden, although I suspected as much. I also know that "American" and "English" are similar, but many "slang" terms can be misinterpreted. Should you run across anything you don't understand, please let me know....I'll be more than happy to try and help. "American English" is my first language, and German is my second(though I'm not very fluent with it). I understand more than I can speak it, let's put it that way.
I'll be in Europe this Sept, my fiance' and I are going to Germany, the Chech Republic, and possibly Amsterdam.

carlsson
June 9th, 2005, 11:31 PM
As a niche, the Amiga (and the 8-bit Commodore brand) still lives, although with two different owners. I'm not up to date what specs you can get on an Amiga One, but something tells me it can not compete on price or features with a modern PC or Macintosh even (in particular if the Mac is going X86 - not that we know if it will drop the price).

I would say that Swedish people generally speak better English than German people, partly due to that the German population is larger, it still is considered a world language on its own and therefore the need to learn a different language was much less. It is fourteen years ago I had a German incident, so things and school may have changed, but as it appeared in West Germany in the early 1990's, knowledge in English - or at least dare to use it - was a rare thing even among teenagers. In Swedish school, French and German were considered optional 3rd language (Spanish, Russian etc 4th languague), but it may have changed recently so you are required to pick up a 3rd language for a while.

BTW: with English you mean British English? I guess you can get some misunderstandings inbetween too, in particular slang usage unknown on the other side of the big sea. You also have Australian, New Zeeland and many other variations..

Kaptain Skitzo
July 16th, 2005, 04:44 PM
Yeah. The base language is the same, although with regional accents and slang, it can get a bit confusing. Hell, here in the USA, there are at least 4 distinct versions of English being used. Generally, we can pretty much understand each other. If you happen to run across something you don't understand, don't hesitate to ask....if I know, I'll tell you.

Terry Yager
July 16th, 2005, 05:29 PM
Yeah. The base language is the same, although with regional accents and slang, it can get a bit confusing. Hell, here in the USA, there are at least 4 distinct versions of English being used.

Does that includs Ebonics (or U-bonics, to a Southerner)?

--T

Terry Yager
July 16th, 2005, 05:30 PM
I have to listen very carefully when conversing with a Canadian-speaking visitor.

--T

80sFreak
July 17th, 2005, 05:55 PM
plus up to three years in gymnasium, which is something inbetween high school and college.

Interesting use of the word "gymnasium"... Where I come from it means a place or room that is inside where your do physical education.. It is sometime shortened to just "gym".

Cheers,

Bryan

80sFreak
July 17th, 2005, 05:59 PM
I have to listen very carefully when conversing with a Canadian-speaking visitor.


How aboot that, eh?

Cheers,

Bryan
(Canadian)
:D
Who would love to get his hands on an ICON....

carlsson
July 23rd, 2005, 05:12 AM
Uh, right. We have gym too, which would come from gymnastics. I believe gymnasium may have athletic bounds too, from the Latin, where people would take higher education and training to be fit at the same time (well, not literally at the same time). I think the same level of education is called gymnasium or similar in both Holland and Germany.

Regarding people from Canadia (heh), I have the impression I would in general understand their spoken language better than I understand most US people, and even better than I understand some British (even English) people.

Anyway, Amiga is derived from Spanish, I think..

Kaptain Skitzo
August 4th, 2005, 11:38 AM
Yeah. The base language is the same, although with regional accents and slang, it can get a bit confusing. Hell, here in the USA, there are at least 4 distinct versions of English being used.

Does that includs Ebonics (or U-bonics, to a Southerner)?

--T

Yeah....Ebonics, Redneck, Street Slang(Older version of Ebonics), Yuppie, Kidspeak(the white-suburban teenage slang), Yankee....as well as region specific dialects.
For example, people here in Baltimore, use the word "Hon" alot. It's pronounced "Hawn"(an example of the Dundalk accent). Everyone is a "Hon". "Haws ya dooin dere, Hawn?" = "How are you doing, hon?"
Someone actually wrote a lexicon of Baltimore-ese...and how to "communicate with the natives". Pretty amusing, but highly accurate.

Terry Yager
August 4th, 2005, 02:16 PM
I haven't seen that page, but I did stumble on a "PhillySpeak" page once...

--T

marcfrick2112
September 18th, 2005, 01:46 AM
Hello all,
A stock Amiga 600 was not terribly useful....but there were some expansion options. My father had an A600 with an '030/50Mhz CPU add-on with 32 MB RAM, DCTV semi-24-bit graphics unit...(load and save 24-bit, but displayed about 5 million color via Composite), Epson Stylus Photo printer...etc. He Loved that machine, and so did I. Sadly, the HD controller and floppy controller died on it almost the same time, a few years back...
I saved the Hard Drive, just in case I can ever find another 600.....

carlsson
September 18th, 2005, 03:34 PM
Woo, a video card expansion on a '600. I always thought those things were for owners of 2000/3000/4000. The hard disk should probably work really well in a 1200 too, if you find it and have the space for it.. the numeric keyboard takes some valuable desk space. :wink:

marcfrick2112
September 19th, 2005, 11:56 PM
Hello Carlsson,
Technically, the DCTV is not a video card per se, but a device that solved the problem of getting 24-bit graphics ability on virtually any Amiga (except Amiga 1000) It doesn't have true 24-bit output, but has slow-scan digitizing ability. These units were $500.00 US when new.... now with real graphics cards available for the Amiga, they are sold for about $50.00 tops. Nevertheless, they are truly useful gadgets. We (my dad and I) have 4 DCTV units in the house, one for each Amiga! The software for these units was (and still is) very useful.
My dad's current machine is a 1200 HD, and as you said, the extra space for the numeric keyboard made it tough to fit in the space, but it works.

Zmatt
January 2nd, 2006, 08:49 PM
The whole different language thing is quite interesting because in a perfect world we should all be able to understand each other more or less because all western languages save a few are indo-european based ex: brother,bruder. I took some german in high school and I got the hang of it preety quickly because english is closely related to most european languages.
A point a curiosity, i'm not much of a programmer but over here the commands are based on english words or partial words, is it the same there or is BASIC in Germany based on German?

carlsson
January 3rd, 2006, 02:05 AM
is BASIC in Germany based on German?
I can't speak for Germany, but generally all dialects of a programming language use the same vocabulary. Home made extentions and hacks may differ. I have a translated version of C64 Basic, but it doesn't make you happier only because you can use Swedish keywords - rather the opposite as you need to know which keywords it supports and in the case of a listing, translate from "English" to "Swedish". Some computers had Basic with error messages translated, but the keywords unchanged. It would yield funny results in case an error message relates to a keyword, such as NEXT WITHOUT FOR or RETURN WITHOUT GOSUB.