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arfink
November 17th, 2009, 04:22 PM
I need to ship a big computer for someone. It's my HP 64110A, and I have finally found someone who would like to buy it but am not sure how to go about packing and shipping it. It's a big fellow, probably 28" long, 20" tall with the top pack all full, and about 24" wide. So, 28x24x20.

It's also very heavy. I don't have a scale so I'm not sure exactly how heavy. I'd say around 50 lbs. I'm worried that the box will get destroyed. I'm also concerned about what kind/amount of padding is appropriate for this. The machine is pretty ruggedized, but it has a glass CRT and all kinds of other possibly easy to damage bits inside.

So, what kind of box will I need, where can I get it, what kind of packing material will I need, etc.

Thanks!

Lorne
November 17th, 2009, 05:27 PM
Take it to the UPS store or FedEx and have them pack and ship it.
If they pack it, they're responsible for using the right burst strength packaging, padding, etc.

If you don't want to do that, at least go to their website, and find out the requirements because even if you insure it, if you don't use the packaging specs they call for, you won't get paid on the insurance if something happens.

VintageComputerman
November 17th, 2009, 05:34 PM
Home Depot usually has a good selection of packing and moving boxes. Some are 24 x 24 x 36". You might need two spliced together. You will need bubble wrap to wrap it in to. Try an office supply store. Crumpled news papers and Styrofoam popcorn for filler to. Clear 2" wide shipping tape for the seams. Wal-Mart has shipping supplies and boxes too.

Otherwise, the UPS store or some other similar place that packs it and ships it for you.

Sometimes driving down a back ally in the commercial districts will yield boxes and packing materials for free.

Leave like 4 to 6 inched of packing room around the item and mark the exterior as fragile and/or this end up. Leave room for a few hand holes on the side for easy carrying

Tupin
November 17th, 2009, 06:13 PM
Yeah, definitely make sure the box has hand holes.

I'd wrap the whole thing computer in bubblewrap, line the inside of the box with several layers of bubblewrap, and fill in corners with crumpled up newspaper. Put FRAGILE on all sides and THIS SIDE UP on the top of the box.

Dwight Elvey
November 17th, 2009, 06:22 PM
Hi
A couple layers of big bubble wrap and then seal in
plastic 1 mil sheet. Then use that fill stuff that you get
from the hardware store that foams up and solidifies
( for get what it is called ). Do this in two pours so that
it is like a clam shell. Use more sheeting to separate
unit and halves.
CRT should be shipped face down. This may require
additional bracing with cut cardboard because many
of these machines have their keyboards in front.
You want to distribute the weight to the frame so it is
not all on the edge of the keyboard.
Use this side up and fragil stickers.
Dwight

arfink
November 17th, 2009, 07:18 PM
Well, thanks for all that input so fast!

This thing won't be able to ship monitor down though, it's all one unit and I don't think it'd be too smart/balanced to ship it with the CRT facing down.

Still, your suggestions were all very helpful. Thanks!

Dwight Elvey
November 17th, 2009, 08:55 PM
Hi
If you choose to ship it flat, see if the yoke
can easily be removed. There are many cases
of terminals and computers with the CRTs broken
because of the weight of the yoke.
Dwight

Chuck(G)
November 17th, 2009, 09:14 PM
You signature doesn't state where you live. But I'd be tempted to secure all loose parts, take it to Craters&Freighters, have them strap it to a pallet and ship it depot-to-depot truck freight.

nige the hippy
November 18th, 2009, 01:02 AM
I've found double boxing works well, you wrap the computer in thin bubble wrap then pack it into a box, filling all the spaces around it so it can't move in the box. that protects all the knobs switches & all protrusions, & turns it into a "brick". Then you pack the brick in bubble wrap, polystyene Ss or even crumpled newspaper balls or suchlike into a bigger box that's to absorb the shock when it gets thrown out of the lorry.
What Dwight was saying about the CRT is very true, but I'd be tempted to substitute "CRT base board" for yoke, even bent pins can fracture the neck. I'd be tempted to open it up & carefully pack inside too (pink anti-stat bubble wrap) but make sure the recipient knows this before powering up!

arfink
November 18th, 2009, 07:39 AM
Well, the seller seemed to be well versed in this and told me that closing up the front of the machine would be enough to protect the CRT since HP had already designed it to be able to withstand getting bashed around... I'm not so sure.

Here are some pictures of the beast if you don't know what it looks like.
http://picasaweb.google.com/arf.at.sjv/HP64110APortableMainframe#

Oh yes, the the buyer in question is one of the guys running www.hpmuseum.net so he wants it shipped to Utah and then from there he's apparently going to be shipping it to Australia.

Lastly, I'm in the Twin Cities, MN.

Chuck(G)
November 18th, 2009, 08:44 AM
Geez, that's not big! It even has a handle on it. "Big" is what comes in one or more 6 foot EIA racks and is far too heavy to lift, even for Andre the Giant.

Get a double-walled cardboard box, some 1" styrofoam insulation from a home center, construct a "box within a box" with the styrofoam (much denser than normal stuff) and fill a plastic bag with styrofoam "peanuts" and place it between the CRT face and the styrofoam wall of the box. Alternatively, use a partially-deflated beach ball. If the weight is a problem for the box, cut a sheet of 1/4" plywood to fit the bottom.

Use blocks of styrofoam to brace the thing such that it cannot move within its container. Movement while shipping is what causes the most damage.

arfink
November 18th, 2009, 09:40 AM
Didn't you read the dimensions I had listed? They're about right.

Anyways, that sounds far more doable, though the keyboard folds up to cover the display, so that extra padding might not even be necessary.

Also, this is big for me, being that I haven't ever shipped something like this and despite it's size it's still ridiculously heavy.

MikeS
November 18th, 2009, 08:04 PM
Geez, that's not big! It even has a handle on it. "Big" is what comes in one or more 6 foot EIA racks and is far too heavy to lift, even for Andre the Giant.

Yeah, isn't "Portable Mainframe" an oxymoron? Sure stretches the definition... ;-)

arfink
November 18th, 2009, 08:41 PM
I didn't make it up, HP did. :) It's in all their literature on the machine.

Ole Juul
November 18th, 2009, 09:19 PM
Isn't that around the same time period that they made one ton TV sets that needed an engine hoist to get them up on the coffee table but were advertised as "portable" because the had a handle? In other words, in the parlance of the day, "handle" = "portable". :)

Dwight Elvey
November 18th, 2009, 09:21 PM
Didn't you read the dimensions I had listed? They're about right.

Anyways, that sounds far more doable, though the keyboard folds up to cover the display, so that extra padding might not even be necessary.

Also, this is big for me, being that I haven't ever shipped something like this and despite it's size it's still ridiculously heavy.

Hi
The reason for shipping it face down isn't to protect the face ( that is
actually quite strong ), it is to protect the neck inside. There is often
quite a bit of weight in the yoke and sometimes additional circuitry
hanging on the socket. These are not well supported by the neck
of the tube and the types of impacts in shipping are usually dropping
on the bottom of the container. This puts a lot of side thrust on
the neck and on the CRT mounting.
I've see several people complain about, an otherwise well packed
machine, that they found the CRT had ripped from its mounting
and the neck was broken.
Dwight

arfink
November 29th, 2009, 01:48 PM
Hi
The reason for shipping it face down isn't to protect the face ( that is
actually quite strong ), it is to protect the neck inside. There is often
quite a bit of weight in the yoke and sometimes additional circuitry
hanging on the socket. These are not well supported by the neck
of the tube and the types of impacts in shipping are usually dropping
on the bottom of the container. This puts a lot of side thrust on
the neck and on the CRT mounting.
I've see several people complain about, an otherwise well packed
machine, that they found the CRT had ripped from its mounting
and the neck was broken.
Dwight

OK, that makes more sense then. Well, since shipping on it's face isn't going to be an option, I'll have to open it up and secure the tube properly.