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Computer Collector
June 20th, 2005, 05:04 PM
Im not sure what its like where you live, but around here we have a lot of thrift stores called Goodwill. A few years ago these stores were real interesting, I could go in and find all sorts of vintage stuff. But lately they have been going a bad direction around here. I spoke with a manager and my suspicion is confirmed: They dont sell any computer stuff anymore. They automatically throw it away. Although I have rescued some of it from the dumpster (some nice and perfectly good working stuff, by the way) utimately, this is a problem. I cant make it out to the dumpsters of all the stores every day, and who knows what they are throwing away; TRS-80s, Wangs, who knows? They have changed the appearance of their stores. now all the Goodwills around here want to be pristene consgnment clothing stores. They try to keep the stores neat and clean and dont want to sell computers. The problem is, some of the stores fence off their dumpster and I cant get to the computers that are doomed.
They ought to sell it so that I can go in and buy the stuff. I bet all sorts of good old Commodore software has been thrown out. The people just keep giving the stuff to them! I think Im going to make an advertisement that says "dont give your old computer to a thrift store that will just throw it away. Give it to me - free pickup" :D

barryp
June 20th, 2005, 05:50 PM
Im not sure what its like where you live, but around here we have a lot of thrift stores called Goodwill. A few years ago these stores were real interesting, I could go in and find all sorts of vintage stuff. But lately they have been going a bad direction around here. I spoke with a manager and my suspicion is confirmed: They don't sell any computer stuff anymore.

I'm not sure how Goodwill works here, but lately I've given them a bunch of stuff.

I do know how the Salvation Army works; they have a store where folks can buy stuff, but they also have auctions where they sell the leftover stuff that doesn't make it to the store. I used to go to their auctions before my space disappeared.

vic user
June 21st, 2005, 04:00 AM
They ought to sell it so that I can go in and buy the stuff. I bet all sorts of good old Commodore software has been thrown out. The people just keep giving the stuff to them!

yep, i know how you feel.

the goodwill near my place now only accepts 486's and up, although they used to be a gold mine for finding all kinds of older goodies.

any older machines they chuck in the bin.

i wish they held auctions like that sally-ann does near barryp's place.

thankfully the goodwill still displays any computer books they get their hands on.

i try and grab any comp. book that looks neat, even if i don't think i will have a use for it, since i can hopefully give some away to other vint. comp. people.

chris

Computer Collector
June 21st, 2005, 07:42 PM
WELL THE GOODWILLS NEAR ME DITCH ALL COMPUTERS. LIKE, ITS THEIR POLICY TO NOT SELL THEM. SO GUESS WHAT I FOUND IN THE DUMPSTER TONIGHT?

I FOUND A NEW HP PAVILION CPMUTER WITH A 50.9GB HARD DRIVE AND PENTIUM 4 PROCESSOR AND WINDOWS XP. IT ALSO PLAYS DVDS AND HAS LIKE 6 SLOTS TO PLUG IN MEMORY STICKS.

I LITERALLY JUST MADE OUT WITH A PERFECTLY FINE WORKING NEW COMPUTER FOR FREE!

MY WIFE AND I JUST WATCHED MY DUKES OF HAZZARD DVD ON IT.

ITS ACTUALLY BETTER THAN MY REGULAT COMPUTER (THAT IM USING NOW)

WHAT A DEAL!!!!!!!!!!!

ahm
June 21st, 2005, 09:01 PM
Sounds like a nice score.

I used to really like Goodwill. I discovered my first store after a friend of time told me about it, and I would go there about once a week to buy toys. After a while the sales people got to know me and when I would walk in, they'd tell me about things I might be interest in that had arrived during the week. I slowly found out about other stores, closer to home. At one point, there was a Goodwill almost literally around the corner from my house. But the stores were closing down, one by one. At first, they seemed just to be moving, but during the last year all the ones I knew have closed. I was down to one store. I had almost stopped going there because it was far and there were less and less "good things" there anymore. I was going to go over there last week, but something told me I should call ahead first; sure enough, the number was disconnected. There must be something going on. I wonder if it's gotten too expensive to have a store anymore? Or maybe they're not getting enough donations? I don't know.

I can tell you that most of the salespeople I met there wanted NOTHING to do with computers. They appeared to be genuinely fearful of them. It was as if clothes were okay because they were easy to understand. But computers were... well, the devil.

Having said that, I did manage to score a computer at Goodwill once, but by accident. One time, my friendly sales person asked me if I had "seen this game" and pushed something across the counter that looked alot like a laptop. I suppose he thought it was one of those kid's V-tech toy laptops. Upon closer inspection, I discovered it was actually an HP OmniBook. It didn't have a power supply but there was enough of a charge on the battery that it would start the POST. So I asked how much. "Ten bucks". Uh... okay, I can do that. When I got it home, I rigged up a power supply (and of course this is one of the few laptops that takes TWENTY ONE VOLTS instead of the usual TWELVE) and the thing booted. Long story short, I was able to get a power supply on eBay and I still use the laptop occasionally. Sure it's only a 486DX50 but it runs DOS fine and in a pinch, it's a great serial terminal. (I may still hook it up as a lap counter for my slot car track).

The other day I discovered a Salvation Army "Family Store". There were computers in the side room with all the stereos and TVs, but really nothing to write home about. They were all recent vintage "white boxes", running XP.

I'm just curious - what part of the country are you in?

carlsson
June 22nd, 2005, 12:10 AM
Over here, the goodwill - and 2nd hand - stores barely have any electronical stuff at all. Probably it takes more space than they can get money out of it. At best you find something on a flea market, but that is a different matter.

We have a recycling station - ┼terbruket - which I've mentioned before. You are not allowed to pick up or buy anything from the garbage other people dropped off, everything goes to recycling. However, earlier this year there was a petition to make the recycling station a reseller of dumped goods, and it would be up to each one dropping their stuff if they allowed it to be resold or recycled. I haven't heard about the matter for a while, but sometimes the stuff left to recycling looks perfectly fine, albeit a little outdated, so it could work. I respect people who don't want their personal belongings end up in someone else's house.

mryon
June 22nd, 2005, 08:45 AM
I've seen the same situation, Goodwill and their ilk just don't have the goodies they used to. They used to be an especially good place to buy calculators. I bought an HP 41c at a Salvation Army store for US$1.

-mikol

Computer Collector
June 22nd, 2005, 03:31 PM
FLORIDA

EvanK
June 23rd, 2005, 10:16 AM
FYI, this article is from the March 21, 2005 issue of my Computer Collector Newsletter ( http://news.computercollector.com ):

---------------------------------

Recently there's been discussion of finding vintage computers at Goodwill stores, via the classiccmp.org's cctalk mailing list. How can we as collectors ensure that significant items aren't disposed of?

Goodwill Industries International, the umbrella organization for 200 independent agencies, does not set master policies for the operations of its 1,874 stores in the U.S., 75 in Canada, and one online (the address is http://www.shopgoodwill.com, but it's up to each store to determine which items are posted). About two-thirds of the stores accept computers, although there is no master list of which stores specifically. The only way to find out is to contact the stores -- information is at http://locator.goodwill.org and (800)664-6577.

But what can computer collectors do to salvage, say, a pre-release prototype of an IBM 5100? "Shop early and shop often" is the approach taken by collectors of most sorts, spokeswoman Christine Bragale noted. Bargains for computer collectors are especially likely to be found at the Goodwill Computer Works stores in Santa Ana, Calif.
(http://www.ocgoodwill.org/computer_works/index.html) and Austin, Texas (http://www.austincomputerworks.org/contact.html) -- the Austin location even has its own computer museum slated to re-open in May.

Store managers are generally alert for valuables, at least since someone found an original Picasso etching in a $3 throwaway pile a few years ago, Bragale said. "The donations attendant who had sorted it saw a broken frame and a picture of a nude," hardly something Goodwill would normally carry, she explained. Luckily that was noticed in time and sold at auction, she said. Vintage computer hobbyists are encouraged to volunteer for sorting duty at their local stores.

Computer Collector
July 22nd, 2005, 11:07 PM
I was dumpster diving last night and found the video "Close encounters",
a late 70s film about aliens coming to the U.S. It was my first time ever seeing the movie, alothough I have like 5 different versions of the the theme song on various records (have have hundreds of records from the 70s). Anway, my wife and I though the movie was very weird. but what I liked most about it was the computers! In the movie, you get to see some old computers, and the big, old tape drives, etc. This just made me want to get a super computer even more! their probably close to impossible to find these days, though.

WishboneDawn
July 23rd, 2005, 05:16 AM
I haven't made any great finds on old computer at a Salvation Army but some of the older software I've gotten is fantastic. Starflight with all the original disks, manual, map, etc. 'Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego' in the box, etc.

I did drop off a Commodore 64 one day (I have 3) but I deeply regret that. I suspect it ended up in the garbage.

MystikShadows
July 23rd, 2005, 06:20 AM
Maybe some of you can help me here. About a month ago, at a thrift store I picked up an 17 inch IBM monitor. I was glad to have found it. Usually IBM monitors are good quality and all....brought it home only to find out it didn't have a standard 15 pin VGA cable.it had what seemed to be 3 parallele ports or 2 and a round weird thing in the middle of the other two .... anyone know what I'm talking about? My first thoughts were that this was a sparc station monitor...but I don't know for sure...I don't have the monitor right now so I can't tell you the model number.

ahm
July 24th, 2005, 06:36 PM
Sounds like you're describing a 13W3.
(Google for "13W3", switch to "images" and see if that's what you have).

MystikShadows
July 24th, 2005, 07:45 PM
Nope...looking at those images it's really 3 seperate connectors on the back of the monitor...at least two look like parralele ports (maybe smaller in design but 25 pins each) and the other, in the middle is either smaller or just looks smaller because of the way they are layed out
_
\ /

but the angle woudl be more like 30 (more slanted) and same on the other side

Terry Yager
July 24th, 2005, 09:20 PM
Nope...looking at those images it's really 3 seperate connectors on the back of the monitor...at least two look like parralele ports (maybe smaller in design but 25 pins each) and the other, in the middle is either smaller or just looks smaller because of the way they are layed out
_
\ /

but the angle woudl be more like 30 (more slanted) and same on the other side

Could it be a terminal with two serial ports and one for the keyboard? (Are the 25-pin jacks male or female?)

--T

MystikShadows
July 25th, 2005, 05:09 AM
In the back of the monitor they are female. all of them. there's no symbol or drawings or labels to indicate what they are...:-)

Terry Yager
July 25th, 2005, 08:49 AM
Hmmmn... Did you find a model number yet?

--T

MystikShadows
July 25th, 2005, 09:24 AM
Well the number 5825 comes to mind..but that's just off the top of my head.

carlsson
July 26th, 2005, 04:44 PM
An image would defintely help. So there are two 25-pin DSUB or similar, and then a round (?) DSUB in the middle? The IBM 3192 terminal has a CRT which takes a 25-pin DSUB for video, but I doubt they made 17" CRTs to go with terminals..

I was also going to suggest 13W3 or some other odd connector with big "cannons" (I know some IBM RS/6000 used a DSUB-ish connector only consisting of three big ones), but this clearly is not the case.

Here are some other common pinouts:
http://pinouts.ru/pin_Video.shtml

I suppose your monitor also can not be related to AT&T PC6300, an old 286 which according to the page above uses 25-pin DSUB as well (?) as 8-pin (round) mini-DIN.

Uranium-235
December 6th, 2008, 06:21 PM
HaH. I love ressurecting old things (including threads), which is kind of the point here I guess.

Anyways, i've been volunteering @ our local Goodwill computer works (hopefully to be hired this upcoming year) and I found this dead system, I brought back to life (motherboard replacement, the new one barely fit), its not vintage, but its rare. Comes with everything you see here

on the subject of vintage, I found some nice old 8" floppies lying around haha. I'll keep my eyes open for older stuff, I know we have some pretty old stuff lying around. I already saw a commodore and Kaypro2, but thats no big deal to me as my family has already owned both of those, too bad we're missing some keys off the commodore

NathanAllan
December 6th, 2008, 08:32 PM
I remember the hot wheels computers!! I have a chassis for one here, but no outer case. Weird, without the outer case the drives have very little support. And getting a power supply to fit is a challenge. I was thinking of using as an accessory slaved box, maybe scsi, but maybe USB, who knows.

To follow up on the goodwills and thrifts around here, most of them throw away computers and I can't catch any. Lots of cops have been called on dumpster divers, and with the local gang crap coming from Mexico, I can't blame them. But still...

The thrifts are the best places for computers, as overpriced as they seem to be, they're the only ones that have anything anymore. The stores are pretty good for games and programs and the odd video game oddity (found a Blip! from '77 for $2).

No thread is dead, merely "vintage." :)

NathanAllan
December 6th, 2008, 08:42 PM
double post, oops.

yrfoxtaur
December 7th, 2008, 11:44 AM
hmmm.
never see comp stuff in local goodwills, but we have St. Vincent De Paul's....
Bet good will could give any comp stuff they have to them

Chuck(G)
December 7th, 2008, 01:30 PM
You can also visit http://www.shopgoodwill.com for the occasional vintage item. Right now, there's an Atari 65XE on the list.

NathanAllan
December 7th, 2008, 04:46 PM
You can also visit http://www.shopgoodwill.com for the occasional vintage item. Right now, there's an Atari 65XE on the list.
Tempting! I wish they would tell shipping on things. I tried to estimate shipping but it didn't work and returned an error. I'll keep an eye on it, though.

Nathan

docred
December 7th, 2008, 05:16 PM
Our local Salvation Army doesn't ever seem to have much in the way of computer stuff anymore, but over the years Value Village (similar in some ways to Goodwill and Sally) has been a pretty good source of stuff for me. Last year or two though they haven't been taking much computer stuff, and its slowed down a lot. I think its just the way the wind is blowing as some of the items we want get even more 'vintage' unfortunately. I've had some good luck over the years with hanging out a shingle at the local corner store 'any and all computers and parts wanted - will pay cash'.

NeXT
December 7th, 2008, 05:27 PM
Kamloops is horrible.
It either ends up in the hands of very aggressive recyclers (they called the cops on me once because I kept going to their annual community computer recycling drives and offering money for computers they were getting) and and anything that ends up in the donation bins at the local second hand stores is either thrown out on sight, stripped and then sold as overpriced parts or sold for insane prices. Our local Value Village sells NES games for $20 per game (and it looks like people buy them as the games seem to vanish from shelves), The salvation army usually throws their computers out and the other less notable places don't know a Commodore 64 from a toaster and somethime they put the stuff on the shelf or put it behind the counter with a $100 pricetag.
The best place I managed to find notably vintage computers was my local landfill and to get them I had to wait until they closed and then manouver myself over an electric bear fence to get at them.
Kamloops is a terrible place.

nymetropolitans
December 8th, 2008, 01:40 AM
The Goodwill by me (Bellmore, NY) doesn't stock any computer stuff, new or old. They donate the newer ones and toss the old stuff (like more than 5 years old). In fact, I've never been to one that had any real electronics....but I used to buy some nice furniture at the one in Colonie when I lived in Albany....

Do they have Savers thrift stores in other parts of the country? These places are scattered all over NYC and LI and are grimy as hell but they sell any and everything they get in. I've seen old Atari gaming systems and Commodore 64/128s on the shelves many times....and usually dirt cheap too.

willowmoon93
December 8th, 2008, 05:00 AM
Yep, there's a Savers store here in Appleton, Wisconsin. Don't find much for older computer stuff in the way of hardware but every once in a while a vintage computer game will be there.

My best find at a Savers was a Nintendo Virtual Boy system, complete in box, with four games, one of them complete in box as well. They only charged $15 for the whole lot.

That was a really really good day for me.

Dwight Elvey
December 8th, 2008, 05:55 AM
Hi
One of the big problems for these stores is hard drives.
Since most people wouldn't by a machine with the
hard drive removed and the people at the store don't
know how to clean the data from them, the end up just
tossing all computers.
There have been a few cases of sensitive personal
data on hard drives. I suspect this is part of the
reasoning. I do realize that a vic20 shouldn't be
an issue but I suspect it is easier to just set an
overall policy than to sort out.
It used to be that goodwill was only interested
in items that needed some minor repair so that
they could provide jobs for a few poor people
and help them learn a trade. now days, most
are just used clothing stores.
Dwight

docred
December 8th, 2008, 08:55 AM
Definitely a good point...I picked up an old PC at Value Village a few years ago complete, took it home, booted it up, and found it untouched - all files still there, including a very full My Documents folder with what looked to be all sorts of personal and professional info. Weird coincidence, it was someone I knew (through work) a local politician. I gave him a call and let him know what happened, and that I was destroying the hard drive for him. People don't realize sometimes...

zane
December 8th, 2008, 10:54 AM
I can add a bit to this vintage thread.
shopgoodwill.com shipping is actual ups cost + 5% high bid,
I won a big one once and got the s&h and was like wtf!
Not sure bout now, been years, but they often do not show everything. I use to get original boxes and manuals 50% of the time and had no idea, big smiles.

GW is trying to recycle all the computers, major areas in full effect already.
So it may be a good idea to make up a business card to present to your local goodwill, ie., Homers Computer Recycling Co.

I made a living for 3 years from the local goodwill, they had auctions weekly, next town over was daily. I would buy shopping carts full of old comps for 2-3 dollars, among other things. Once the recycling set in, bye bye so much good stuff. I could only look into crates and see classic gems headed for the shreader after that, OHH and I SO WANTED TO GRAB! But 4 kids to feed, hands stay firmly in pockets.

No computers where I live now either, prices have gone up on electronics, shelves use to stay pretty bare, I swear it will fall soon from all the overpriced crap building on it now.

Unknown_K
December 8th, 2008, 01:43 PM
Recycling is going to slow down alot now. Since the economy has slowed to a crawl so has the demand for recycled material, companies are having problems finding buyers and prices have sunk to record lows.

NeXT
December 8th, 2008, 03:04 PM
Definitely a good point...I picked up an old PC at Value Village a few years ago complete, took it home, booted it up, and found it untouched - all files still there, including a very full My Documents folder with what looked to be all sorts of personal and professional info. Weird coincidence, it was someone I knew (through work) a local politician. I gave him a call and let him know what happened, and that I was destroying the hard drive for him. People don't realize sometimes...

Yeah however like in the case of my IRIS Crimson, not only did they take the drive but also the sleds and that makes the system pretty useless.

Chuck(G)
December 8th, 2008, 05:39 PM
Years ago, I picked up a computer that had been given up because the owners lost the boot diskette. I had one and discovered the complete records of the state dental association. I let them know that I would be wiping their hard drive.

Some people still believe that a high-level format wipes out all data.

Terry Yager
December 8th, 2008, 08:27 PM
I once picked up a computer at a county auction which contained the complete(?) tax records for the county from about ten years earlier. All kinds of kewl info that a less honest person could have exploited, names, addresses, tax assessments, income, etc. I think it's experiences like these that have made people so paranoid nowadays.

--T

MikeS
December 8th, 2008, 08:32 PM
I once picked up a computer at a county auction which contained the complete(?) tax records for the county from about ten years earlier. All kinds of kewl info that a less honest person could have exploited, names, addresses, tax assessments, income, etc. I think it's experiences like these that have made people so paranoid nowadays.
--T
-----------
Especially when you tell them; why bother, just wipe it and let them sleep at night.
Ignorance is bliss...

nblsavage
December 8th, 2008, 08:50 PM
Something to check for in your area is a Goodwill Outlet. This is basically where items that didn't get sold in regular Goodwill stores wind up. Everything just gets dumped in a bunch of bins and rolled out to the floor. At mine computers usually go for $5-$10. Most parts/floppy software are priced by weight so that comes out dirt cheap. My Apple II+, Amiga 1000, Osborne Executive, C128, and many vintage game consoles came from there.

Micom 2000
December 8th, 2008, 09:41 PM
When I lived n Toronto the main source of my collecton was thrift stores. The second was curbside putouts which meant you had to get out late at night or early in the morning before the rest of the recyclng vultures get out. Some of my finds were amazng. The bowng out of thrift-stores from offerng computers started back in the mid-90s, since most of their personnell hadn't a clue of what the computers were and would toss a DEC Rainbow while retaining a trashy Packard-Bell XT. And of course it would remain on the shelf unwanted. Most times thier pricing reflected that same lack of knowledge which favored me if I got there before they threw the good stuff out. That was were i got my original MICOM 2000 with all peripherals, software and documentation. It had belonged to a lawyer and even had a form on disk to make a will. At one point there were about 12 DEC Rainbows with keyboards for $5 each, while their old PCs and Macs were offerred for $15-$20.

I had a nice Rainbow at the tme. But couldn't resist and did buy two, but at one move put one of them on the curb along with a Wyse 101. Hope someone knowledgeable got them. The other I traded for an Atari Mega-4 many years later. I still have my original DEC R-B many times upgraded. A computer with a hard drive CPM and Dos partitoned and the ability to do MSDOS and numerous versions of CPM. Woo-Hoo. And with a color card and monitor. Still one of my favorite computers.

The small villiage and area in which I now live is far from any major city and while there is a thrift store it sells mostly used clothing to support Mennonite ventures in Africa. The thrifty local citizens rarely toss anything and even a C-64 can be offered for $50 because it IS a COMPUTER.

Fortunately there is a town dump which some local wags call our "TOWN SHOPPING MALL".
There I managed to scoop 2 DEC PRO 350s discarded by a local Oil-dealer when he upgraded( in 2005 !!). I sold one for $150 a couple of years ago before shippng costs went thru the roof and kept the other which had a hard drive. I also managed to trade a VGA monitor for a complete Adam with manuals, and original tapes, as well as some disks and cartridges for the Colleco-Vision which was part of the package. Later at a yard-sale in Vancouver where I was visiting I scooped a large box of Colleco cartridges.

I visited Vancouver several times in late spring, ostensably to visit friends and grand-children but also to scour the massive discards of the spring "all garbage accepted clean-up" and had some great finds. Unfortunately I didn't have enough room in my not-small Chrysler 2-door to take all of them over the Rockies and across the prairies to my central-Canada home, but for a few I convinced my friends I would arrange transport or shipping if they would store them. I also provided some of my grandsons there wth newer working game-machines including one with a Grand Theft Auto disk, to the displeasure of my daughter-in-law.

I imagine there are simliar events around US cities but one must be off work those BONANZA days, or get up early to take advantage. With computers becoming a hazardous item and thrift stores refusing them, curbside could now be collectors best source.

Lawrence

Unknown_K
December 8th, 2008, 09:58 PM
Some of my great finds were from people moving unexpectadly and ditching things before they got trashed, or kids who got nice finds but got bored with them after a month and found something new. Also fellow collectors who snagged items for little during the good days and want to pass them on to somebody who will use them and not ebay them.

The local computer reseller who gets old stuff dumped on him is a great place for vintage items (usually free).

Chuck(G)
December 8th, 2008, 10:39 PM
Also, don't forget posting a "wanted" on your local Freecycle, if it's an active list. I've picked up a couple of systems that I needed that way. The "wanted" sometimes jolts people into remembering that they've got an old piece of gear that they've forgotten about.

zane
December 9th, 2008, 09:44 AM
I second freecycle.org! Ask and you may receive(pick up):)
Great place to unload stuff too.

I breed fish as a hobby, gonna pick me up some hot tubs from freecycle this spring, seen at least 6 given away this fall so far. They make great outdoor tanks. :fish:

rebeltaz
December 15th, 2008, 08:49 PM
I just wanted to let y'all know about the policies of our local thrift store. Here we have "America's Thrift Store," formerly "Alabama Thrift Store." This place is run by a man named Buford Salmon who operates as a charity with "money and donations going to Hannah Home and King's Ranch." I used to work for one of their stores as an electronics technician, so I know form where I speak.

First, this place over charges on almost everything that they sell. I have seen used items there being sold for more than the same product brand new at Wal-Mart down the street.

That's not the immoral part - unethical maybe, but not immoral. I see where you of you mentioned "dumpster diving." One of my all time favorite pastimes I must say, but... When items are unfit for sale, they go in the dumpster behind the store. This includes clothing. No I know for a fact that there have been several homeless in need of clothing. They couldn't afford even the Thrift Stores so-called bargain prices, so they just took the clothing they needed from the dumpsters. Innocent enough you might think. I did. Until the management of these stores actually called the police and pressed charges for theft. Not very Christian or even moral, if you ask me.

The whole point of this, aside from just general ranting, was to point out that in my area, if anything electronic hits the dumpsters after being donated to one of these stores - it is gone for good. :(

As a side note, having said all of that, if any one in the Shelby or surrounding areas of Alabama are think about throwing anything out, I mean donating to the Alabama Thrift Store, you could always donate it to me!;)

NathanAllan
December 15th, 2008, 08:58 PM
A friend of mine went to the new goodwill and they told him that any kind of computer or video game goes immediately online for sale. Sounds like they are trying to maximize profits. Along that vein of thinking, shipping is going up again,


http://www.antiqueradios.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=100807

great. And GW's prices will go up accordingly to cover the overhead. So no more local computer sales in this town from GW :(

Druid6900
December 15th, 2008, 09:05 PM
Yeah, I just got the annual Commercial Account pricing increases (which they call "price changes", although none of them actually went DOWN) for Canada Post the other day.

I believe when they say that "it is competitive with industry pricing" they are trying to say "when someone else raises their prices, we ALL do"

They sent it by Canada Post courier.

willie8605
December 16th, 2008, 06:27 AM
I wonder why they toss old computer stuff and keep old video game stuff? I just found a SNES with 20 games and 2 controllers for 20 dollars. A heck of a deal.

I'll have to check the dumpster more often...:D

barythrin
December 16th, 2008, 08:01 AM
Nice find. Ironically .. well .. maybe not ironic, I dunno but NES and SNES are both holding some value now. Guess enough closet vintage collectors are realizing they'd like to play their favorite games from the 80's again. It's an interesting thing that a lot of young adults are starting to get a little vintage bug in them now.

Luzur
December 16th, 2008, 11:44 AM
its not an vintage bug, the 80's are on its way back. ;)

and yeah i "rescued" alot of Nintendo and Commodore stuff from the local recycling station here, even saved a 1977's Atari Superbug ROMset (or what it is called, anyway the rest of the arcade cab was too big for me to sneak off with. :( ) luckily for me my neighbour is working there so he can set aside the more interesting stuff since one isnt allowed to take stuff from there (altough those employed can take whatever they want it seems...)

willie8605
December 16th, 2008, 12:05 PM
Nice find. Ironically .. well .. maybe not ironic, I dunno but NES and SNES are both holding some value now. Guess enough closet vintage collectors are realizing they'd like to play their favorite games from the 80's again. It's an interesting thing that a lot of young adults are starting to get a little vintage bug in them now.

As far as video games go, I have always had a NES and SNES. Well, I once traded in my NES, SNES, Sega Genesis, and Sega Dreamcast to EB Games for a discount off of a new XBOX, but that was a horrible idea and I obtained another NES and SNEs very soon afterwards (which I still play vs. the XBOX which is in storage).

However, I have been getting more interested into old computers solely because I am an electrical engineering student and a lot of things I learn (both with hardware and software) can be seen in the older computers easier than in the newer, more complex machines. It's a good way to learn outside of class. Nonetheless, I still get a good feeling when I get to tinker with old computers :cool:

BuggZ
December 16th, 2008, 01:24 PM
I used to pick up computers at some local surplus sales before they contracted that all out. at one, I got a computer that had been used in a car sales office and had customer's information that included loan applications, and sales contracts. I notified the office the computer originally came from, but they thought the hard drive had been removed. When I returned the hard drive, they insisted on a reward that was more than I paid for the computer. They were so paranoid about liability for loss of customer's private data, they would have done almost anything to get the drive back.

Mad-Mike
December 16th, 2008, 03:13 PM
Here's the thrift report from Everett WA this year....

Goodwill here seems to be cutting down on the amount of computer stuff they carry, as well as the age of the stuff seems to be getting younger. A few years ago, I stocked up on PILES of AT, AT/XT, and quality PS/2 keyboards, and even found an XT keyboard around that time as well, since then, I've started finding more and more modern cheap rubber dome PS/2 and USB keyboards, most of which are the same pack-in's found at Wal-Mart, and most of which are apparently also ditched brand new. I've also been hoarding all the Serial Mice I can find as well. The newer Goodwill is the worse of the two, the other one seems to still carry vintage video games far more often.

Value Village on the other hand, has been a golden epicenter this year and last year for finding older IBM compatible gear. Thus far, between 2006 and 2008 I have found......
- At least 10 AT keyboards
- IBM PS/2 Model 30
- IBM PS/2 Model 59 SL/2
- Holt Office Systems 486
- Macintosh SE FDHD
- Macintosh 6400/180
- AST Premium 386 SX
- Olympic Computers 486 tower
- Several generic AT towers with 486 era parts in them (despite being Pentium II level)

There's another place down near the DMV called "Liquidation Store", which still has an IBM PC 5150 Power Supply for $20.00. There have also been 486 VLB full sized AT EISA boards, Pentium boards of both Socket 5 and Socket 7 design, I also got an AMT 486 from there, and another generic 486 from that shop as well. Their prices however, are kind of steep at times for old hardware, but they tend to have the most interesting stuff including "build it yourself" memory SIMM modules (30 pin), lots of connectors, and various other hardware.

I have not checked out the Salvation Army in Lynnwood in a long time thus far, and usually they are not too good for vintage computer hardware. The oldest PC I saw there was a Packard Bell Legend Pentium I based system with Windows 95, however, they did have a redeeming quality in having Microsoft BASIC for the Macintosh on 800K Diskettes, and a whole slew of 5.25" 360K Floppy Diskettes for my Tandy 1000s both new and used, and some with interesting software on them.

My present haunt for vintage PC stuff is a place called Rich Man, Poor Man computers near the mall. They don't get AT class machines too often back there, but I do find them once in awhile, take them home, and cannibalize them for parts for my older AT class machines, since a lot of those Upgraded Pentiums and K-6's they get in were once 286-486 based machines at one time.

Druid6900
December 16th, 2008, 06:41 PM
its not an vintage bug, the 80's are on its way back. ;)



Oh, good, I'm a little foggy on what happened during the '80s the first time around :)

NathanAllan
December 16th, 2008, 10:28 PM
Oh, good, I'm a little foggy on what happened during the '80s the first time around :)
Oh good, I thought I was the only one. Guess too much Tang and hairspray. And WHAM! tapes.

Luzur
December 17th, 2008, 06:46 AM
i never listened to WHAM!, i listened to Europe. maybe thats why i remember more from those years. :P

Mad-Mike
December 17th, 2008, 10:07 AM
Never listened to Wham, only experimented with Hairspray once (and it did not do much), but I love the 80's, as if not already obvious by my wanton buying/collecting of old 80's Pea Seas.

Druid6900
December 17th, 2008, 11:35 AM
Ewwwwwwwwwww to Tang, Wham and hairspray !!!

If you can't afford the REAL stuff, it's not worth it LOL