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Lorne
January 26th, 2010, 07:48 AM
Does anyone have a real good IC / chip puller that they can recommend?
I've been using this one, ( http://www.cs-sales.net/et10.html ) and it sucks.
Sometimes only one side of the chip comes out when I pull up, and then half the pins get bent.
There must be something better out there.

ruthlessperson
January 26th, 2010, 08:09 AM
I use this one and love it, works really good. http://www.inoviq.com/products/tools/chip-puller/ sometimes the the best tool still yet is a super small flathead screw driver, like a jewelry one

tezza
January 26th, 2010, 08:51 AM
I have one like yours Lorne. It can be problematic if one side of the IC is so hard against the socket there is no gap to get the legs of the tool under it. In general though I find it ok for smaller logic ICs PROVIDED you clasp the IC firmly and gently rock it out. However, for larger chips I use a small flathead screwdriver as mentioned above. The biggest problem with the latter method is it can be difficult to angle the screwdriver in there on a crowded IC board.

Tez

Chuck(G)
January 26th, 2010, 09:15 AM
I use this one and love it, works really good. http://www.inoviq.com/products/tools/chip-puller/ sometimes the the best tool still yet is a super small flathead screw driver, like a jewelry one

I think Lorne was referring to DIPs not PLCCs. For years, I've used one I made myself--a simple J-shaped piece of steel, tapered on the horizontal end and with a very long vertical section. Start by slipping the horizontal edge under a chip, rock slightly, then slip more of the tool, rock a bit more, and out comes the chip, undamaged. Because of the slightly curved horizontal section, there's no problem in clearing adjacent chips.

Lorne
January 26th, 2010, 12:46 PM
Chuck is correct - I should be saying DIP puller.
I've been doing a little digging.
The yellow one that Tez and I are using is meant for thinner DIPs.

I've found a couple interesting ones that look like they're more suited to wider DIPs.

There's: http://www.stanleysupplyservices.com/product-detail.aspx?pn=118-939
but it's not cheap (cheaper than a busted IC though).

Then there's the Sunhayato GX line of IC extractors. (the GX-6 is mentioned in a few places on the web, and looks like a good one). http://www.uno.co.jp/seihin_info/catalog/pdf/0947.pdf
I wish I could read Japanese. I can't even tell how much it costs.

They're also available on an Italian website, but alas I can't read Italian either.
http://www.digivideo.biz/it/elettronica/attrezzatura/index.htm
It's the fourth one from the bottom.
I can get one in my shoping cart, but then I'm totally lost. :)

Now I know how foreigners must feel when they look at our Ebay.

mikerm
January 26th, 2010, 01:53 PM
as far as your Japanese one (I'm not that good at it), I believe:

GX-3 - 14/16/18 (20) pins - 1,800 yen, $20
GX-3L - 22/24/28 pins - 1,800 yen, $20
GX-4 - 22/28 - 1,800 yen, $20
GX-6 - 24 (28) - 1,800 yen, $20
GX-7, 24~64 - 2,500 yen, $28

but don't quote me :)

Lorne
January 26th, 2010, 02:21 PM
as far as your Japanese one (I'm not that good at it), I believe:



Thanks for the translation. You're an infinite number percentage better at it than I am.

If they're about $ 20, they're not far off the other one, which I've found cheaper ($ 18.90) at:
http://www.all-spec.com/products/OK%20Industries/Soldering_and_Rework%7CPCB_Service_and_Repair%7CTO L-08/

By the time you factor in shipping costs from Japan, the $ 18.90 is probably the way to go.
It sounds like a lot of money, but screwing up one BIOS chip in a vintage computer, for the sake of $ 20, would have me kicking myself for a long time.

per
January 26th, 2010, 02:51 PM
I usually just use the plain old flatheaded screwdrive for DIP's. I prefere the one with an appromaxely 5 mm wide blade.

I know it may sound a bit risky (it is a bit risky without practice), but if you are carefull enough you should be able to get it out without breaking anything. If you got the technique rigth, it's actually rather effective and safe. However, the drawback is that you have to be able to reach under the IC with the blade, preferable from both sides. If this is a problem, a tool should be used (either one you have bougth, or one you have made yourself; like the one Chuck(G) have made).

I have pulled a dozeen or so IC's this way, and none has broken so far.

Chuck(G)
January 26th, 2010, 03:24 PM
One can even improvise a chip puller by taking a couple of loose PC-type filler brackets (the L-shaped ones), slip as much of the short leg under the IC, rock the long leg from side to side to gently lift your IC out. If you're dextrous (unlike me), you can do this with two at the same time--one on each side.

Lorne
January 26th, 2010, 04:26 PM
Just as a follow up, I got this translation from a guy (Izumi) in Japan, who mentioned he had a GX-6 when he posted on another forum (an automobile forum!).

Sanhayato GX-6
http://www.sunhayato.co.jp/products/details.php?u=775&id=04540

Model# Pin# IC Wide Ext force Price
GX-3 14/16/18 0.3inch 3kgf $24
GX-3L 22/24/28 0.3inch 3kgf $24
GX-4 22/28 0.4inch 5kgf $24
GX-6 24(28) 0.6inch 7kgf $24
GX-7 24-64 0.6/0.75inch 10kgf $32

Maybe shipping cost (JP to US) is about $10-$15

mikerm's pricing is better. :)

I like the looks of these Sunhayato the best.
They just look like they make it easy to pull the DIP out (with one finger).

But then Chuck(G)'s idea whould work for any size.
With these things you could spend $ 125 to cover yourself in various sizes, and that's a lot of ICs.

dave_m
January 26th, 2010, 07:13 PM
I like the looks of these Sunhayato the best.

It is hard to tell with just a picture but it looks a littler sturdier than the OK Industries EX2 which I have. The EX2 is fairly flimsy but is OK for light usage.

Lorne
January 27th, 2010, 06:46 PM
Just as a follow up, I got this translation from a guy (Izumi) in Japan, who mentioned he had a GX-6 when he posted on another forum (an automobile forum!).

Sanhayato GX-6
http://www.sunhayato.co.jp/products/details.php?u=775&id=04540



I'm replying to my own quote which is weird, but I found out that the link provided above actually has an English version page (it's not very good though, and can sometimes revert to Japanese).
Through a little searching on that site, it turns out they do have a distributor in the US.
Based on other web searches, I'd say the US distributor isn't doing much distributing (or marketing for that matter).

MisterH
June 2nd, 2011, 06:12 AM
I have a sun hayato GX-8 IC extractor. I'm willing to sell it to anyone who wants it for a reasonable amount plus P+P.

It is suitable for 6/10" 24,28,40,42,600 mil 40 chips.

Email me if you're interested.

Rob

MisterH
June 6th, 2011, 05:48 AM
I have a sun hayato GX-8 IC extractor.


oops - it's a GX-6 sorry for the typo. I've put it up on eBay now

http://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/e12000.m43.l1123/7?euid=ceffb32aea5e4076aa6437398a8d989d&loc=http%3A%2F%2Fcgi.ebay.co.uk%2Fws%2FeBayISAPI.d ll%3FViewItem%26item%3D300564627035%26ssPageName%3 DADME%3AL%3ALCA%3AGB%3A1123

barythrin
June 6th, 2011, 12:47 PM
I guess I've never been unable to get the access I need to a DIP to do the job with a flat head screw driver. You just go for one side of the dip, put the tip in and twist slightly to nudge that side loose, then go to the other side do the same (prevents you from completely pulling one side out and bending the hell outta the pins). Once it's raised you just continue to gently pry it straight up from each side at a time (again to minimize bent pins).

Tetrium2
June 6th, 2011, 03:33 PM
One can even improvise a chip puller by taking a couple of loose PC-type filler brackets (the L-shaped ones), slip as much of the short leg under the IC, rock the long leg from side to side to gently lift your IC out. If you're dextrous (unlike me), you can do this with two at the same time--one on each side.

That's a good one actually, never thought of that ;)

I found out those blank slot covers are handy for Phillips screws if I can't locate my screwdriver

Anthony12
June 9th, 2011, 11:21 PM
I think Lorne was referring to DIPs not PLCCs. For years, I've used one I made myself--a simple J-shaped piece of steel, tapered on the horizontal end and with a very long vertical section. Start by slipping the horizontal edge under a chip, rock slightly, then slip more of the tool, rock a bit more, and out comes the chip, undamaged. Because of the slightly curved horizontal section, there's no problem in clearing adjacent chips.

Like ur post..............

GADFRAN
June 10th, 2011, 02:45 PM
For what it is worth – “my 2 cents ! “

Basically I agree with the “short, thin, narrow, small flat head screw driver method.”

Maybe all of this thread should be posted on the “ info wiki “ of this site for newcomers to our hobby to encourage them.

My collection includes varieties about 2” long with blades from 1 mm to 2 mm – that seem to work the best for me.

Some even from the Dollar Store – collection of about 10 – 5 flat + 5 Philips head – all for $1 – difficult to beat that price ! Of course, all can be used for many other projects also, as opposed to a “ dedicated “ chip puller.

Also the tiny screw drivers that come with the replacement screws for eyeglasses are very appropriate I found and readily available like the Dollar Store varieties.

I can even post a picture if necessary.

================================================== ============

I have had to remove many chips on our Kaypros, when they were not soldered in as in the early days before soldering became more prevalent. Advantages / disadvantages of course.

I tried many different methods, including some commercially available and even very expensive – I was desperate ! All had their issues – none worked well for all projects for me.

Bending back “bent” chip legs can be tricky, especially without breaking them off !

Then trying to solder them back on if they break off ??? Many issues.

Then to top it all off, if the chip is not readily available ???

So for those “ new and just starting out in this great hobby,” this can be a very big issue – there are many voices of hard won experience on this site ! Just ask !

You may want to practice on some of your “junk” boards with chips until you perfect your own personal technique.

For you fellow “old timers,” you know all this so well – for some of us it was a very big learning [“ bitter !” ] and expensive experience in so many ways !

================================================== ==============

Can have no bent legs, if you do it very slowly and carefully – first working on one end of the chip and then the other.

A slow gentle approach seemed to be the best, especially since in many older computers, the chips may have bonded in some way, especially by just friction and due to oxidation / corrosion, to make them very difficult to loosen and eventually release them from their sockets.

Even if you can just get the tip of the blade a little into the space between the chip and the socket, you can slightly and carefully twist the blade to slightly raise the end of the chip.

Then insert the blade in further and repeat until you can get the blade in enough to pull and / or push the blade up to further lift the end of the chip.

Big or smaller chips could have the same technique used – obviously, more effort for larger chips like the Z80’s – CPU, SIO, PIO, but less effort for those chips only about
“ long.

If chips were close together, adjacent ones could be very carefully used as “leverage” to gradually remove a chip.

Hope of some interest, use, etc.

All the best always – especially “ luck “ !

Frank

Caluser2000
June 10th, 2011, 06:28 PM
Having removed the riscPCs' roms recently a couple of times with a similar tool to the GX-6 I'd go for the flat blade/edge of some sort and lifting one end at a time slow gentle approach as well next time. When the chips are quite tight it can be quite easy to have one come out with quite a rush if you are not careful. Flung one ROM over my shoulder onto the floor due to the amount of force needed to remove it. Used a pair of tweasers to make sure pins were all aligned and vertical so they fitted into their sockets easier.

GADFRAN
June 14th, 2011, 05:39 PM
Welcome to the club !

All the best with the latest earthquake - so sad !

Let us know on this site even, we get so little info on that area in the world in our media.

But did have a nice article in our local newspaper about a vacation there !

You have no Walmarts ! Is that true ???

Too bad, I just picked up a bunch of 2 TB Seagate External HD drives in the clearance bin for only $60 each !!! - Good for my archiving.

All the best always !

Say hello to Tez also.

Frank