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alegro
March 12th, 2010, 04:43 PM
I think this is a module for an early 1980's IBM keyboard. Any info is welcome.

Chuck(G)
March 12th, 2010, 04:54 PM
Chicony sold a lot of IBM PC clone keyboards.

Could be anytime during the 1980's; flip it over and I could probably tell you if it was from an XT or AT Chicony keyboard. Probably AT, though.

alegro
March 12th, 2010, 06:08 PM
Thanks for the info. Unfortunately there is no text on the underside.

Is this card of any collectible value?

Chuck(G)
March 12th, 2010, 06:23 PM
What I wanted to see was the traces on the bottom.

But no, I don't think that there's any collector's value to the card. :(

alegro
March 12th, 2010, 06:31 PM
How about this one?

linuxlove
March 12th, 2010, 06:35 PM
I'm not sure but it looks to be a 16-bit MFM controller.

alegro
March 12th, 2010, 06:42 PM
Is something like this of collectible value? I don't have much pre-Pentium frame of reference.

Chuck(G)
March 12th, 2010, 06:59 PM
It's a Western Digital MFM controller about 1989 or so, from what I can see from the photo. The floppy part is unpopulated.

As for the collectability, it might be useful to some of forum members here. But MFM controllers, even at this date, aren't rare.

per
March 13th, 2010, 06:34 AM
When considering collectible value, it really depends on the individual. In my own case, I collect most cards because of the use and to have spares in case I need one. I have however shown a sligth interest in collecting especially 8-bit ISA cards from IBM, but that's because the IBM cards are quite well documented and supported (at least most of them).

Some cards that are worth quite a lot is cards that have a function in demand for many collectors, or cards that can be defined as "landmarks" from companies that has sucseeded quite well today. The last group of cards worth quite some is unique cards. By unique, I mean that the function has been spesialized for a narrow market, and the cards weren't supposed to sell in great amounts.

The majority of valuable cards are in the first group, as most of us collectors actually use our cards in our old machines. There are also a lot of cards in the second group, and the buyers here are mainly the trophy-hunters. Some of the cards in the second group can also be defined in the first group too. Only a fraction of the cards (nobody really knows) are in the thrid group, even they are in fact the rarest ones. The problem there is that almost nobody knows about the cards there, and due to spesialized functionality those cards does not usually go into the two other groups. This means that there are very few buyers, hence low demand.

But the vast majority of cards in general aren't worth more than from $5-$25. Those are the common cards created for the mass-market, and the quality differs from company to company. This group of cards often clones functions from IBM's cards, or combines/enchantes them.

alegro
March 13th, 2010, 07:46 AM
~Chuck(G), I have attached a photo of the traces on the chicony module.

~per, Chuck(G), and linuxlove, - thanks for the info/education.

I've posted photos of a Paradise video card. I'm guessing its either in the first group, or the fourth group (mass produced, common).

Also I've posted photos of another card which is apparently similar to the WD controller card? It says CD-ROM, so I'm guessing it adds CD drive functionality. Therefore it falls in either the first category (useful to afficianados), or the fourth (common) ? Am I getting this, or am I way off?

per
March 13th, 2010, 08:41 AM
~Chuck(G), I have attached a photo of the traces on the chicony module.

~per, Chuck(G), and linuxlove, - thanks for the info/education.

I've posted photos of a Paradise video card. I'm guessing its either in the first group, or the fourth group (mass produced, common).

Also I've posted photos of another card which is apparently similar to the WD controller card? It says CD-ROM, so I'm guessing it adds CD drive functionality. Therefore it falls in either the first category (useful to afficianados), or the fourth (common) ? Am I getting this, or am I way off?
When I was defining the first group above, I was more thinking of extremely usefull uncommon cards like the Central point Option board Deluxe or the 8-bit Silicon Valley ADP-50 16-bit IDE controller.

The paradise VGA card is in fact quite usefull, and it's sligthly uncommon being the 8-bit-only version. However, despite it's quite usefull, a lot of 16-bit VGA cards (far more common) can be used for just the same thing, so I would only put it in the upper half of the $5-$25 range.

About the CD card, it's problably either using a panasonic interface or a ATAPI (or IDE) interface. It seems to be quite recent, and it's problably using PnP. PnP cards aren't really regarded too well among collectors, as older computer obivously doesn't do PnP. I would say it's in the lower half of the $5-$25 range.