PDA

View Full Version : Help finding serial card dos drivers/settings.



Phil
April 26th, 2010, 04:57 AM
I just got a Compaq Portable III which has a 8 bit serial card with 25 pin male d-sub connector. The markings on the card are: Copyright Microversal, SYNKARD, CJC-1187-01, REV 1.

Anybody know where to get DOS drivers and jumper settings from. I've searched the posts in this forum and googled till I can google no more but can find no info.

...
Phil

Chuck(G)
April 26th, 2010, 08:55 AM
Got a photo? Does it use an 8250?

Phil
April 26th, 2010, 11:35 AM
http://s872.photobucket.com/albums/ab282/lxPhilxl/?action=view&current=Microversal_Synkard.jpg

First time uploading a pic so hopefully the above worked. No biggy if it doesn't as I think I'm answering my own question below.

It doesn't have a 8250. The markings on the chip at top left are:
Z8530H-6PC
006D9XE
(C) 1986 AMD

So am I right in thinking that this is a 8530 serial chip and any generic 8530 DOS driver should do? There's also a total of 19 jumpers on the card . . . nope, missed one - make that 20 jumpers, obviously for IRQ and such. I don't have any use for the card at the moment but would like to store it along with the driver.

Chuck(G)
April 26th, 2010, 12:39 PM
The Z8530 SCC is a pretty exotic animal. My guess is that your card is made to be paired with a data-link application and not a general-purpose async. RS-232C device.

Most likely, it was part of an X.25 bisync, HDLC/SDLC setup. A little Googling shows that there's a Linux driver for it, search on "Z8530 HDLC".

There do appear to be DOS drivers (http://www.baycom.org/bayweb/tech/pciscc/pciindex.htm) for it if you have a use for it.

Minerva10210
April 26th, 2010, 12:56 PM
Hmmm, nearly made a peanut of myself on this thread.
I had the post open earlier to answer, and only got to it now, like 2 hours later.

I was going to say if it is a standard rs232 card, it should not need any drivers for DOS - oops! :blush:

Phil
April 26th, 2010, 02:05 PM
The Z8530 SCC is a pretty exotic animal. My guess is that your card is made to be paired with a data-link application and not a general-purpose async. RS-232C device.

Most likely, it was part of an X.25 bisync, HDLC/SDLC setup. A little Googling shows that there's a Linux driver for it, search on "Z8530 HDLC".

There do appear to be DOS drivers (http://www.baycom.org/bayweb/tech/pciscc/pciindex.htm) for it if you have a use for it.

Excellent info there Chuck, many thanks. Time for me to go doing some research on this unassuming little card and the HDLC/SDLC setup. That's one of the reasons I love this hobby; there's always something that comes along out of the blue and opens up yet another avenue of research, there's always something new to learn.

...
Phil

Phil
April 26th, 2010, 02:07 PM
Hmmm, nearly made a peanut of myself on this thread.
I had the post open earlier to answer, and only got to it now, like 2 hours later.

I was going to say if it is a standard rs232 card, it should not need any drivers for DOS - oops! :blush:

No such thing as "making a peanut" out of yourself Minerva. If we all knew all the answers the internet would be redundant and a lot of people at google wouldn't be best pleased.

...
Phil

Chuck(G)
April 26th, 2010, 02:37 PM
Excellent info there Chuck, many thanks. Time for me to go doing some research on this unassuming little card and the HDLC/SDLC setup. That's one of the reasons I love this hobby; there's always something that comes along out of the blue and opens up yet another avenue of research, there's always something new to learn.

The Z8530 touches on another tidbit. It's a Z8000 peripheral, yet was probably least-deployed for that CPU. Like the Signetics 2651, the peripheral was better than the CPU. The designer of the Zilog Z80 SIO/DART chips also designed the Intel 8274 (just compare the datasheets) and I suspect, the Z8530. I don't recall if Intel ever followed up with a product of their own.

Back in the days of leased data lines, synchronous communications ruled. If you wanted a 9600 bps link to somewhere, you called Ma Bell and she'd set up a connection at both ends with a 209 modem with a nice DB25 connector for you to hook your equipment to. A hookup between San Francisco and Chicago would run several thousand dollars a month, when a dollar was still a dollar. The telco would take care of the modems (leased to you) and the line quality issues. But it was synchronous and often, half-duplex, so it had to be block-oriented with a well-defined protocol.

I lost more than a bit of hair setting such connections up until well into the 1980s. Fortunately, synchronous protocols have been largely forgotten. I couldn't even find a photo of a Bell 209 modem on the web.

My hair grew back. :)

Ole Juul
April 26th, 2010, 04:08 PM
. . . Back in the days of leased data lines, synchronous communications ruled. If you wanted a 9600 bps link to somewhere, you called Ma Bell and she'd set up a connection at both ends with a 209 modem with a nice DB25 connector for you to hook your equipment to. A hookup between San Francisco and Chicago would run several thousand dollars a month, when a dollar was still a dollar. The telco would take care of the modems (leased to you) and the line quality issues. But it was synchronous and often, half-duplex, so it had to be block-oriented with a well-defined protocol.

I lost more than a bit of hair setting such connections up until well into the 1980s. Fortunately, synchronous protocols have been largely forgotten. I couldn't even find a photo of a Bell 209 modem on the web.

My hair grew back. :)

I've got a leased line modem, but I guess they're not interesting since this thread (http://www.vintage-computer.com/vcforum/showthread.php?16065-Paradyne-3440-modem&p=104736#post104736) didn't go anywhere. :) It looks really cool though and has built in line diagnostics.

Chuck(G)
April 26th, 2010, 05:49 PM
Paradyne was a good modem maker. Others wer Milgo, Telebit, Vadic, etc.

My first "fast" modem was a Racal-Vadic VA3451 "triple modem" (http://cgi.ebay.com/Racal-Vadic-VA3451-Auto-Dial-Modem-/320330436638?cmd=ViewItem&pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4a952e901e)

This was all high-priced stuff once--now, it goes begging for jumk prices.