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CP/M User
August 31st, 2005, 04:08 AM
Just out of Curiosity, I was just wonderning what does everyone here generally listen to with regards towards the type of music?

Also, Does anyone listen to anything which hasn't got any Rock influences - by this I guess you could say pre-Rock 50 years ago? (Perhaps Not).

Rock in itself has become diverse, within it are so many catagories of the main styles, Rock 'n Roll, Pop, Rock, Metal, Disco/Rap, that even so many of those have their own groups in style.

I think it'd be interesting to see what everyone listens to and let us know (if you can) what you may listen to most of all - as well as listing what else could fit in!

Cheers,
CP/M User.

vic user
August 31st, 2005, 06:36 AM
most of my listening is classical music, especially late 19th century early 20th.

i also listen to i guess what you could call experimental music.

i also love Soukous, as that style of guitar just blows my mind.

once in a blue moon i will tune into the local uni. station, to hear what's up on the indie scene.

i try to avoid commerical music like the plague, and as a result i have no cluse whatsover of any current bands and that.

chris

mryon
August 31st, 2005, 07:05 AM
sorting my iTunes my play count, at the top I see:

Great Big Sea, Ashley MacIsaac, die ärzte, The Russian Futurists, The Sex Pistols and Charlie Christian.

Charlie Christian would count as your pre 50s, non rock...and Ashley MacIsaac, sometimes.

Terry Yager
August 31st, 2005, 07:22 AM
Among the many other genres that I listen to, I like early Blues recordings, from the '20s & '30s, and Big Band/Swing from the '30s & '40s. I also like some older Ragtime stuff from around that same period, and oh yes, let us not forget, Jazz.

--T

Mad-Mike
August 31st, 2005, 09:13 AM
Typically I just listen to 80's Rock like The Police, Van-Halen, Metallica, ZZ Top, Journey, Rush, Loverboy, Rhoads era Ozzy Osbourne, Iron Maiden, as well as some 90's alternative early grungeish stuff like Nirvana, Bush, old old old Green Day, and Pearl Jam, and the Foo Fighters. But I also listen to lots of wacko experimental electronic music like Nintendo NSF files and old self-programmed midi's, I also make my own music using my computer and a multi-track recorder program, sort of a rock meets NES music sort of thing I have going on.

vic user
August 31st, 2005, 10:05 AM
I also make my own music using my computer and a multi-track recorder program, sort of a rock meets NES music sort of thing I have going on.

you might want to check this guy's site out:

http://firteen.com/

he is a fellow vic 20 user, and i think you and him have much in common.

chris

DimensionDude
August 31st, 2005, 05:30 PM
Looks like I go along with Mad-Mike.

My collection is mostly Rush, Yes, Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, U2 et al.

I'm not immune to newer stuff, either, like Muse, Era and Enigma.

Terry Yager
August 31st, 2005, 07:02 PM
I mostly play classic rock ('60s, 70s, 80, 90s), but when in the right mood, I'm liable to play just about anything...(ever heard 16th-century French chamber music?)...

--T

CP/M User
September 1st, 2005, 02:20 AM
It's funny that Pink Floyd should get a mention. A mate of mine was playing Eclipse rift(?) from the Dark Side of the Moon album & telling me how it has some sort of musical significance (which dated back from one of the composers). But as he was telling me, this idea came from The Beatles Abbey Road Album in which one of the tracks had a rift - believed to have been done to modernise some composition.

I'm more a Yardbirds fan myself, but their circumstances to disband while on tour left Jimmy Page with the Groups Name & in which he had some gigs to fulfil in Scandinavia, he quickly got a band together & performed as the New Yardbirds. This group would transform into Led Zeppelin - but I reckon it would be interesting to get a copy of that Scandinavian tour (Like they call it The New Yardbirds tour). Quite strange what happened to them (Yardbirds) though, since they were producing some interesting stuff as late as 1968.

> ever heard 16th-century French chamber music?

Is it anything like Harpers Bizarre?

Their like these 5 guys which sing in a chapel that I think had a hit with the Paul Simon song "The 59th Street Bridge Song (Feelin' Groovy)" & "Chattanooga Choo Choo". They perform a few Randy Newman songs (do you know him?). Guess if you heard the Theme song to the 2nd Season of Monk, you'd know Randy Newman.

CP/M User.

mryon
September 1st, 2005, 07:18 AM
True that, lots of Led Zeppelin and Yardbirds in my list these days as well.

....and Robert Johnson of course. ;)

Terry Yager
September 1st, 2005, 05:03 PM
Oop-boop-didum...dadum-wadum-choo! I remember Ish Kabibble...

--T

Terry Yager
September 1st, 2005, 05:39 PM
Actually, French chamber music was spun-off into french folk music, which was imported to America via Canadia, and evolved into Cajun (Accadian, from the Accadia area of Canadia they migrated from), and in particular, Zydeco music, which is where my interest in it began, tracing it's roots back into the 16th century.

--T

CP/M User
September 1st, 2005, 11:45 PM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> Actually, French chamber music was spun-off into french folk music,
> which was imported to America via Canadia, and evolved into Cajun
> (Accadian, from the Accadia area of Canadia they migrated from), and
> in particular, Zydeco music, which is where my interest in it began,
> tracing it's roots back into the 16th century.

Strange then that my Pete Seeger doesn't have samples of this French Folk Music, might of been too much to fit them all onto some Vinyl, he does some folk tunes from Israel (Road To Eliat), Germany (Gendanken Sind Frei), Korea (A-Ri-Rang), Irish (Kisses Sweeter than Whine), Scottish (I think Paddy Works On the Railroad is Scottish), Africa (Bayeza - A song with many parts flowing with it) - he does this Whailing Song demonstrating how they sang it in the West Indies & how they Sang it in America (which is quite interesting). Course he didn't get any Australian Folk stuff in either.

CP/M User.

Terry Yager
September 2nd, 2005, 02:00 PM
I just googled "French Folk Music" and there's lots of hits, including MP-3 d/l sites, if ya wanna hear some for yourself...

--T

Terry Yager
September 2nd, 2005, 02:04 PM
Oh yeah, Glen Miller's In the Mood is on my top-ten all-time favorites list (which usually seems to contain more than ten selections).

--T

CP/M User
September 2nd, 2005, 02:05 PM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> I just googled "French Folk Music" and there's lots of hits, including MP-3
> d/l sites, if ya wanna hear some for yourself...

'Fraid I won't be able to do this from home (my Computer's a bit slow at MP-3s), though the machines at school should be able to do this! Thanks!
:-))

> Oh yeah, Glen Miller's -In the Mood- is on my top-ten all-time favorites
> list (which usually seems to contain more than ten selections).

Yes I love that song myself, sadily I only know about it since it was a big hit in it's day, but never-the-less I love it down to the cow bell! I personally think it's a timeless song. Sad to see Glen Miller go so early though! :-(

CP/M User.

Terry Yager
September 2nd, 2005, 02:09 PM
Yowsa, yowsa, yowsah!

--T

Terry Yager
September 2nd, 2005, 02:24 PM
I personally think it's a timeless song. Sad to see Glen Miller go so early though! :-(

Yeah, I think GM's band was the equivalent of today's Rock bands...I'm sure he trashed a few hotel rooms in his day...(I mean, he even wrote a song about thier phone number)...

--T

CP/M User
September 3rd, 2005, 01:44 PM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> Yeah, I think GM's band was the equivalent of today's Rock bands...I'm
> sure he trashed a few hotel rooms in his day...(I mean, he even wrote a
> song about thier phone number)...

Do you think Glen Miller could have been bigger than "The Beatles" if he was around for much longer?
I guess not since the Rock scene was always going to happen. Though Folk seemed to squeeze it's way into the Rock era and I guess you could say that a little bit of Jazz did as well (if that's what you could put "Chicago" & "Blood, Sweat & Tears" into!).

CP/M User.

Terry Yager
September 3rd, 2005, 04:12 PM
Some music just can't be put into any single category.

--T

CP/M User
September 4th, 2005, 12:25 AM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> Some music just can't be put into any single category.

True, I think I mentioned earlier that many Rock groups might have an emphasis on another swing or in some events do something entirely different from one day to the next - usually has an impact when some changes to a groups line-up have occured, not always though.

CP/M User.

carlsson
September 5th, 2005, 01:59 PM
Most or all "popular" music is related to eachother and cross-bread. Folk, blues, jazz, rock, pop, country, hard rock.. the list can go on.

Funny that you should mention BST. One of my favorite groups are The Ides of March, based in Chicago since the mid 60'ties but got their big break in 1970 after adopting the BST horns and got one Billboard top position with "Vehicle". A few years later, they seemed to drift into country style and replaced a few members. Then the band took a break until the early 1990's and has since then recorded a few new albums and goes on yearly mini tours around Chicago. I found out about them by luck, when I found their second album (Common Bond) in a pile of LPs bought from the auction. Even more luck, my local record store had the other three albums in, all in very good condition. I might even consider to import the recent CD recordings.

Otherwise, I listen to most music. Classical music, marches, movies, musical, pop, rock, jazz, blues, novelty and so on. Playing in a concert band has to some extent opened my view for classical music, but I keep finding great works that are too complex or too traditional to play, so I have to live with only listening to recordings. :wink:

Terry Yager
September 5th, 2005, 02:08 PM
Carlsson,

What instrument do you play? I kinda like the sound of the oboe, although the clarinet is probably the most popular woodwind with most people.

--T

Terry Yager
September 5th, 2005, 02:13 PM
[quote="carlsson"]Most or all "popular" music is related to eachother and cross-bread. Folk, blues, jazz, rock, pop, country, hard rock.. the list can go on.

It's all fusion/crossover/derivative/influenced these days. Every artist/group "borrows" something from those who've come before (which is partly what keeps music "alive"...everyone adds a little of thier own to what has already been done).

--T

carlsson
September 5th, 2005, 02:27 PM
I play the alto saxophone, although I do have a resonably playable oboe in the closet. With playable, I mean that someone who knows how to play the instrument would be able to use it, not that I can play it. But I've tried!

http://www.anders.sfks.se/mp3/send_in_the_oboe.mp3

The ultimate goal for artists who mix and derive from known genres must be to create their own genre or at least variation. It seems almost all styles have sub-styles with its distinct followers. Take hard rock as an example. First, it divided into heavy metal. Then we got speed metal, slow metal, death metal, fairy tale metal (or whatever) and I'm sure those also have been tagged into sub-categories. As long as the band always plays the same kind of music, it is enough to make it just a little bit different from the other, and voila, you got yourself a new genre variation.

CP/M User
September 8th, 2005, 01:38 AM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> It's all fusion/crossover/derivative/influenced these days. Every
> artist/group "borrows" something from those who've come before
> (which is partly what keeps music "alive"...everyone adds a little of thier
> own to what has already been done).

I tend to think that everyone has been borrowing something for quite sometime. For instance Folk (which I'm kinda limited to) was present in POP groups back in the 1960s, Pete Seeger came before that - though played more Traditional Folk. Harry Belafonte did a bit of everything from Calypso to a bit of Folk as well. The Weavers though (with Seeger & Co. getting into hot water over), sets the scene for groups like Peter, Paul & Mary, The Springfields (before Dusty went Solo) & Aussies own Seekers. Dylan was writing his own brand of Folk. Guess it's different from borrowing something else - perhaps they were more previliaged! ;-)

Can't see how they Fuse Folk to something heavy - it just would sound right!

CP/M User.

carlsson
September 9th, 2005, 04:49 AM
I think Musette by Johann Sebastian Bach (from the Anna Magdalena Notebooks) would make a great punk/hardrock tune. Recorded from my rather dull sound card:

http://www.anders.sfks.se/mp3/bmusette.MP3

Terry Yager
September 9th, 2005, 07:53 AM
Not a bad sound. I like it.

--T

carlsson
September 14th, 2005, 02:04 AM
Speaking of which, I still have another SB Live! card in my desk drawer. So far, I've hesitated to install it after all the sh*t experience I had with the first Live, and live with an older SB AudioPCI. Maybe I should give it a try, as it should have up to three MIDI synths and possibly better audio output.

The bad one is a CT4830 from 1999, the untested one is a CT4780 from 2000.

CP/M User
September 15th, 2005, 01:40 PM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> I just googled "French Folk Music" and there's lots of hits, including MP-3
> d/l sites, if ya wanna hear some for yourself...

I did a search for this yesturday, but it came up with just a lot of sites with
the term "French Folk Music". I tried narrowing this down by including the
term "MP3" with "French Folk Music" though it just seemed to have sites
beiefly mentioning "French Folk Music" & suggesting other musical sites
with MP3s! :-(

I also tried www.mp3.com but couldn't really work out who performs this
type of music - I went into Folk on there, but just went into Tradional
Folk & Contempory Folk - they should of had a sub-category for French
Folk - but none to my avail. :-(

Terry, if you have more luck finding sites, artists for this - could you
please post them here.

Thanks,
CP/M User.