PDA

View Full Version : What is this? Wildcard 88?



pkmnct
July 8th, 2010, 08:26 PM
I recently, while digging through a bunch of computers at a junk yard, found a small card that says "Wildcard 88" on it. The connector looks like a 72 pin memory simm. The card itself looks similar to this (http://ummr.altervista.org/images/DSCN6445.JPG) but the chips are arranged differently and there are two connectors (one has a Daewoo BiOS in it) on the side opposite of the card than the "Wildcard 88" text. I will try to upload pictures of it tomorrow. It says "REV B," "ASSY. REV. E,"(C)INTEL'78'86," and "80C88AL" on it if that helps. I am very curious on what it is used for.

IBMMuseum
July 8th, 2010, 08:43 PM
I recently, while digging through a bunch of computers at a junk yard, found a small card that says "Wildcard 88" on it. The connector looks like a 72 pin memory simm. The card itself looks similar to this (http://ummr.altervista.org/images/DSCN6445.JPG) but the chips are arranged differently and there are two connectors (one has a Daewoo BiOS in it) on the side opposite of the card than the "Wildcard 88" text. I will try to upload pictures of it tomorrow. It says "REV B," "ASSY. REV. E,"(C)INTEL'78'86," and "80C88AL" on it if that helps. I am very curious on what it is used for.

CPU (80C88AL under the hermetic sealing) on a stick (surprisingly also a socket for an 8087). Well, more specific to a system (probably a laptop model) with the BIOS. I have two of these myself, never getting to the point of trying to use them.

Fredbug
July 8th, 2010, 08:46 PM
I dont have the exact specs on it, But basically its a XT motherboard on a simm.
There was a XT computer that used those, Leading edge I think. I think they
were meant for embeded computers.

Bruce

Chuck(G)
July 8th, 2010, 08:59 PM
ISTR that Intel tried to market these for embedded applications. There was a backplane with a few SIMM slots. Memory, video, disk, etc. were on other similar cards. While an interesting idea, it didn't catch on because of a few factors. One was the chip-bonded-to-the-PCB issue (no repair possible) and all the extras. It was simpler (and probably cheaper) to design your own conventional 8088 board.

A quick Google showed quite a bit on the web, mostly product announcements. I honestly don't know what you could do with just the BIOS-less card now.