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EddieDX4
August 2nd, 2010, 04:35 PM
Not sure if any of you have been following the few AT&T UNIX PC's that have been popping up on eBay the past few weeks. There's one that I've been eyeing for some time now, mainly because it includes the original software diskettes.

http://cgi.ebay.com/VINTAGE-AT-T-UNIX-PC-w-SOFTWARE-/200493773267?cmd=ViewItem&pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2eae5c31d3

From the pictures, overall, it looks to be in decent shape. The keyboard has some bizzare stains that almost look like burn marks (they almost follow of a patter of a small electrical spark). I do have a few questions for the seller, but before I venture into contacting and consequently making an offer to the seller, I was wondering what the general consensus is on these units.

It doesn't seem there's much that can be done with them, and aside from having development libraries available to write my own applications, there's not much in the way of programs to experiment with. I would put this in the category of "interesting machines", and not in the same league as those that still can serve a purpose or be enjoyed (e.g. IBM PC/XT class machines, etc...)

One that looked much cleaner, sold by the original owner, but did not include the original disks, sold with a single bid of $149 a couple of weeks ago.

It does not seem like there's an easy gauge beyond that. With the "suspect" markings on the keyboard, and the overall closeup pictures showing a bit of wear (albeit minimal), I would "appraise" it a tad lower for the system, but the software ups the value. I think it pretty much breaks even. I'd be willing to pay a bit more. However, with the latest streak of delusional eBay sellers, I'm not sure the seller would accept an offer in the $150 ~ $200 range. At the same time, I'm not sure if it would be sensible for me to even pay that much.

Any thought/opinions on this? Any fellow UNIX PC enthusiasts in the forums that could shed some light on the usefulness (or uselessness) of these vintages?

EddieDX4
August 2nd, 2010, 04:42 PM
I just sent a few questions on to the seller, including whether or not he's able to run any hard/fixed disk diagnostics from the diagnostics diskette, and also if he'd be willing to invoke the HDD park function from the diagnostic diskette as well.

billdeg
August 2nd, 2010, 07:35 PM
I recently did a UNIX PC demo at HOPE (2600 magazine), I believe I posted a thread about it here on this forum a few weeks ago. It was a very popular exhibit, many attendees at HOPE used the UNIX PC or knew about it. I have a full library of software for the UNIX PC, mostly development stuff, but also the standard office aps and games. A version of MS Word was published for the UNIX PC. You could run Lotus and many other DOS aps on this machine too. It's a very usable system even today, I think they're very historical.
Bill

EddieDX4
August 2nd, 2010, 07:43 PM
I recently did a UNIX PC demo at HOPE (2600 magazine), I believe I posted a thread about it here on this forum a few weeks ago. It was a very popular exhibit, many attendees at HOPE used the UNIX PC or knew about it. I have a full library of software for the UNIX PC, mostly development stuff, but also the standard office aps and games. A version of MS Word was published for the UNIX PC. You could run Lotus and many other DOS aps on this machine too. It's a very usable system even today, I think they're very historical.
Bill

Hi Bill,

Thank you for you input! I'm going to do a search for the thread about your demo, I'm very interested in reading up on it! I'm waiting for the seller to get back to me before submitting an offer.

I'd like to have one of these in my collection, and knowing that there's a few apps out there that could be useful today is reassuring.

I know these machines can read MS-DOS formatted floppies, but, how easy is it to create images of the original disks on a PC? I'd like to preserve the software for it, since I know these floppies won't last forever. Can they be imaged using a 360k drive on a PC? (I have one installed on my Gateway 2000 P5-133 XL now, which I'll be using to make disks for my Compaq Portable)

billdeg
August 3rd, 2010, 05:03 AM
Note that there are 2 major model types of UNIX PC, the 7300 and the 3B1. There are also variations of each. The 3B1 with the 67MB hard drive is the beefiest of them.

Here are some links about the AT&T UNIX PC from my web site

http://vintagecomputer.net/browse_thread.cfm?id=360
HOPE with AT&T 3B1 exhibit and pictures

http://vintagecomputer.net/browse_thread.cfm?id=305
Thread about my UNIX PC 7300

http://vintagecomputer.net/browse_thread.cfm?id=42
Thread about my UNIX PC 3B1

http://vintagecomputer.net/ATT/
Pictures of AT&T systems, repairs.

billdeg
August 3rd, 2010, 05:13 AM
Hi Bill,

I know these machines can read MS-DOS formatted floppies, but, how easy is it to create images of the original disks on a PC? I'd like to preserve the software for it, since I know these floppies won't last forever. Can they be imaged using a 360k drive on a PC? (I have one installed on my Gateway 2000 P5-133 XL now, which I'll be using to make disks for my Compaq Portable)

Check to see if the system you're interested in has the DOS emulation card installed, or you will not be able to easily read DOS disks in a UNIX PC. The add-on card was a hardware emulator with good but not complete DOS 3.1 compatibility. Some of the DOS commands are not available using the AT&T-supplied DOS diskette.

From DOS you can partition (in a manner of speaking) the system to connect with a drive called UNIX, which gives you the ability to send files to and from the UNIX system from the DOS emulator.

There is a GUI that comes with the UNIX PC. From there you can access utilities to copy disks, etc. All of the Foundation disks (OS build) I assume are preserved on the web. When you turn on the UNIX PC and you make it to the login prompt, type "tutor" [enter]. It should take you directory to the AT&T Office GUI. From there you can run and install programs. Tutor user does not have admin privs however, you'll have to log in as root or the equivalent and then run uA (IIRC) from root to get to the admin utilities provided by the GUI.

Rather than using the disk drive, most people with a UNIX PC were moving files through the modem or ethernet ports, via Kermit, etc.

Bill

glitch
August 3rd, 2010, 05:45 AM
You can back up UNIX PC diskettes in native format using ImageDisk, which does work with a 360 KB PC drive. Or you can dd them into a file using the UNIX PC and transfer them over the Ethernet/serial port to another machine. It should be interesting to see what sort of software comes with it!

EddieDX4
August 3rd, 2010, 10:20 AM
Check to see if the system you're interested in has the DOS emulation card installed, or you will not be able to easily read DOS disks in a UNIX PC. The add-on card was a hardware emulator with good but not complete DOS 3.1 compatibility. Some of the DOS commands are not available using the AT&T-supplied DOS diskette.

From DOS you can partition (in a manner of speaking) the system to connect with a drive called UNIX, which gives you the ability to send files to and from the UNIX system from the DOS emulator.

There is a GUI that comes with the UNIX PC. From there you can access utilities to copy disks, etc. All of the Foundation disks (OS build) I assume are preserved on the web. When you turn on the UNIX PC and you make it to the login prompt, type "tutor" [enter]. It should take you directory to the AT&T Office GUI. From there you can run and install programs. Tutor user does not have admin privs however, you'll have to log in as root or the equivalent and then run uA (IIRC) from root to get to the admin utilities provided by the GUI.

Rather than using the disk drive, most people with a UNIX PC were moving files through the modem or ethernet ports, via Kermit, etc.

Bill

I'm afraid the seller might not know enough to answer that question (as it stands, I've yet to receive a response to my more basic questions), but I do own a pair of Phone Line Simulators that I could use to connect the machine up to another via modem and transfer files using kermit.

Ethernet ports you say... These machines had Ethernet as well?

I'm checking out your site for more information. It's great to have resources such as yourself in the forums. :-D

glitch
August 3rd, 2010, 12:27 PM
Yes, there was at some point an Ethernet module made for the expansion slot, but good luck finding one! You're far more likely to find a 1 mbps StarLAN card. You don't need a phone line simulator though -- connect the UNIX PC to another machine's serial port and transfer files that way. You'll also not be limited to the 1200 baud internal modem's speed. You'll need a null modem cable or adapter, but those are cheap to buy and easy to make, if you don't already have one.

EddieDX4
August 3rd, 2010, 01:48 PM
Yes, there was at some point an Ethernet module made for the expansion slot, but good luck finding one! You're far more likely to find a 1 mbps StarLAN card. You don't need a phone line simulator though -- connect the UNIX PC to another machine's serial port and transfer files that way. You'll also not be limited to the 1200 baud internal modem's speed. You'll need a null modem cable or adapter, but those are cheap to buy and easy to make, if you don't already have one.

I happen to keep a null modem adapter handy for such occasions... Good call! Well, we'll see if I end up getting it at all... No response from the seller, yet, and I don't want to submit an offer to stress about it for 48 hours, only for it to expire on its own instead of at least being declined. I am also not paying $400 plus $55 shipping for it. :)

Lord Moz
August 4th, 2010, 05:04 AM
I have 2 UNIX PCs and 1 set of docs/disks. I may be willing to part with one of the machines and copy the software & docs for you if interested. Most of the documentation is 3 hole loose-leaf, and I could feed it through my HP auto-duplex sheet fed scanner to make a bunch of PDFs for ya. I had been planning on doing that eventually anyway.

I'm not looking to make a profit, just don't want to lose anything. I acquired the first machine in the mid-90s from a salvage shop in Portland for ~$20 IIRC, and the 2nd in mid '09 (for ~$140 shipped) just because it was sold with all the disks and books. So, I don't need the second machine, and would love it to go to someone interested.

Both machines are 20MB and have 1MB ram, however one has the full 1MB onboard, and the other has only 512KB onboard with the other 512KB on an expansion card. No other expansions are installed, but both are (or were last I checked, will boot up both soon to verify) fully functional and loaded with 3.51 system software.

I can post or email pics if interested. Both are in pretty good shape with no serious discoloration or blemishes, other than the 512/512 machine having some engraving on it from the university it came from. I'll have to look, but I seem to remember it being a WA state school.

I think the UNIX PC has quite a bit of class, and I remember being excited when I saw one in the movie "The Secret of My Success (http://www.starringthecomputer.com/computer.php?c=50)" back in the day.

That 512/512 UNIX PC was my very first taste of Unix and was my motivation to get interested in Linux and FreeBSD in HS. After getting it home and starting it up, my dad and I spent the longest time trying to figure out how to log into the thing, before learning about "root" from a guy at our church at the time. The internet wasn't what it is today in the mid-90's, but I did learn about the "tutor" login, and managed to get to a shell prompt from tutor. The root login was password protected, and we didn't have the password, but the UNIX PCs version of Unix has next to no security, and I managed to copy the /etc/passwd file to a new file, edit the root password out, and then somehow copied it back. I don't remember if it was exactly that easy, but that was the gist. Was amazed at my "mad hacking skills" and at the machine's terrible security :p

Anyway, just let me know if you are interested in the machine and/or copies of the disks and docs.

__
Trevor

EddieDX4
August 4th, 2010, 11:05 AM
I have 2 UNIX PCs and 1 set of docs/disks. I may be willing to part with one of the machines and copy the software & docs for you if interested. Most of the documentation is 3 hole loose-leaf, and I could feed it through my HP auto-duplex sheet fed scanner to make a bunch of PDFs for ya. I had been planning on doing that eventually anyway.

I'm not looking to make a profit, just don't want to lose anything. I acquired the first machine in the mid-90s from a salvage shop in Portland for ~$20 IIRC, and the 2nd in mid '09 (for ~$140 shipped) just because it was sold with all the disks and books. So, I don't need the second machine, and would love it to go to someone interested.

Both machines are 20MB and have 1MB ram, however one has the full 1MB onboard, and the other has only 512KB onboard with the other 512KB on an expansion card. No other expansions are installed, but both are (or were last I checked, will boot up both soon to verify) fully functional and loaded with 3.51 system software.

I can post or email pics if interested. Both are in pretty good shape with no serious discoloration or blemishes, other than the 512/512 machine having some engraving on it from the university it came from. I'll have to look, but I seem to remember it being a WA state school.

I think the UNIX PC has quite a bit of class, and I remember being excited when I saw one in the movie "The Secret of My Success (http://www.starringthecomputer.com/computer.php?c=50)" back in the day.

That 512/512 UNIX PC was my very first taste of Unix and was my motivation to get interested in Linux and FreeBSD in HS. After getting it home and starting it up, my dad and I spent the longest time trying to figure out how to log into the thing, before learning about "root" from a guy at our church at the time. The internet wasn't what it is today in the mid-90's, but I did learn about the "tutor" login, and managed to get to a shell prompt from tutor. The root login was password protected, and we didn't have the password, but the UNIX PCs version of Unix has next to no security, and I managed to copy the /etc/passwd file to a new file, edit the root password out, and then somehow copied it back. I don't remember if it was exactly that easy, but that was the gist. Was amazed at my "mad hacking skills" and at the machine's terrible security :p

Anyway, just let me know if you are interested in the machine and/or copies of the disks and docs.

__
Trevor

Thanks, Trevor! I might take you up on that offer, if the eBay one falls through the cracks (which is looking like as of yet...no response from the seller).

There's a lot more people knowledgeable on UNIX PCs in the forums than I anticipated. It is a great thing.

EddieDX4
August 4th, 2010, 05:05 PM
So I had missed it but the seller did respond to me... Stated that he did not run the HDD diagnostics and have not tested HDD functionality (and, made it sound as if no further testing will be performed).

However, he did offer to run any HDD heads park function off the diagnostics disk if I were to buy it and sent him the instructions. (hmmm...so why can't he run through the HDD diagnostics?)

I have a feeling it has a dead HDD (otherwise, why would he be booting off the diagnostics disk, and not even running the HDD diags?) So I'm not sure I want to take the gamble. The amount I'd offer is much lower than the asking price (I was thinking more in line with the really clean one that sold recently). I have a feeling this might offend this seller.

So, I think I might skip. The included original disks, though, seem enticing.

barythrin
August 4th, 2010, 09:53 PM
Yeah, original disks are always fun to have although those disks I think all come with manuals IIRC so while it's probably a nice set of software (actually if the seller doesn't get a sale they might consider breaking them up and lowering the initial bids) they may come again. I have no idea how common the systems are. I bought mine a few years ago at a ham fest. I don't remember the price (I completely assumed they would be asking a fortune for it) but it was a good deal (maybe $120) but it was up and working. Only after I was already ecstatically getting ready to carry it to my truck did he whip out a box "Oh, this goes with it too" and original manuals/software. It was great lol (one of those few great grab stories I have). So it may or may not hurt their feelings, but if you want throw them a low offer and maybe they'll realize you were the only offer/bid and reconsider or skip the risk and perhaps Trevor is your good save here. The gentleman I bought it from also was more so wanting to have it end up in good hands so we both lucked out as well. Even while I carried it out to the truck I was stopped several times by folks asking and commenting about how neat of a system it was.

EddieDX4
August 4th, 2010, 11:30 PM
Yeah, original disks are always fun to have although those disks I think all come with manuals IIRC so while it's probably a nice set of software (actually if the seller doesn't get a sale they might consider breaking them up and lowering the initial bids) they may come again. I have no idea how common the systems are. I bought mine a few years ago at a ham fest. I don't remember the price (I completely assumed they would be asking a fortune for it) but it was a good deal (maybe $120) but it was up and working. Only after I was already ecstatically getting ready to carry it to my truck did he whip out a box "Oh, this goes with it too" and original manuals/software. It was great lol (one of those few great grab stories I have). So it may or may not hurt their feelings, but if you want throw them a low offer and maybe they'll realize you were the only offer/bid and reconsider or skip the risk and perhaps Trevor is your good save here. The gentleman I bought it from also was more so wanting to have it end up in good hands so we both lucked out as well. Even while I carried it out to the truck I was stopped several times by folks asking and commenting about how neat of a system it was.

Love the great grab stories! That is the best case scenario... A good deal, plus documentation to boot. :)

glitch
August 5th, 2010, 07:34 AM
If the hard drive /is/ dead, you can replace it with any old MFM drive. The hard drive setup/format program allows you to specify the C/H/S of the drive if it's not in the lookup table (they have several common drives pre-configured). I plan on replacing the dead 20 MB drive in my UNIX PC with a Seagate Wren II when I've got the time.

EddieDX4
August 6th, 2010, 01:15 AM
If the hard drive /is/ dead, you can replace it with any old MFM drive. The hard drive setup/format program allows you to specify the C/H/S of the drive if it's not in the lookup table (they have several common drives pre-configured). I plan on replacing the dead 20 MB drive in my UNIX PC with a Seagate Wren II when I've got the time.

That's really good to know... Makes me consider it even more. I keep getting cold fit just as I'm about to confirm the offer, so I haven't submitted it. Maybe I should listen to my instinct and forget about it.

Lord Moz
August 6th, 2010, 03:33 AM
That's really good to know... Makes me consider it even more. I keep getting cold fit just as I'm about to confirm the offer, so I haven't submitted it. Maybe I should listen to my instinct and forget about it.

"What's the matter McFly, are ya CHICKEN?" :p *revs engine* :cool:

__
Trevor

EddieDX4
August 6th, 2010, 10:19 AM
"What's the matter McFly, are ya CHICKEN?" :p *revs engine* :cool:

__
Trevor


NOBODY.....CALLS ME.....CHICKEN!

*goes and submits a ridiculously high offer*

antiquekid3
August 6th, 2010, 12:26 PM
I have offered several low-ball offers and have been very surprised with the good outcomes from them! However, I've also had those experiences that make me wonder how crazy people really are. I submitted a request for old telephones a long time ago into a section of our local newspaper called "Good Neighbors." A guy called me saying he had some wall-mounted magneto phones. I was really excited! He described them as being in good shape, so I posed the question: "how much?" He said some extraordinary amount (maybe $1000), and when I explained to him that I was only 14 or so, he said "Oh." and hung up the phone!!

When I posted an ad for vintage computers, a guy called with an original Compaq portable. He originally said $100, but after I explained that I like to find old things and restore them (I rarely say "collector," as that would imply I have money! Haha!), he said I could take it for $15. However, he was about an hour drive, which was too far away for me. Oh, well!

I happen to be in Mürren, Switzerland right now, and two days ago I was in Interlaken. There was an antique jewelry store across the street from where I was staying. I rang the doorbell, and the lady comes to the door and asks if she could help me. I said I'd just like to look around. She says it's by appointment only. I can't imagine in such a touristy area a store like that surviving very long, but she seems to have been there for a long time. I asked her if she had any antique watches, and she looked at me like I was an idiot and explained that this was a jewelry store. Hmph.

Sorry for the off-topic-ness. But I feel better after saying that! :) Good luck with the UNIX, whichever you decide to get!

Kyle

Lord Moz
August 6th, 2010, 08:31 PM
NOBODY.....CALLS ME.....CHICKEN!

*goes and submits a ridiculously high offer*

:D Good luck with your offer, and my offer of copies of the docs still stands, even if you get that machine. I had been considering scanning it all and archiving it anyway, but haven't had any good motivation to do so yet.

I've been kicking myself for the last year ever since I missed a DOS card for the UNIX PC. Seems to happen too frequently... I tend to snipe things on eBay, but haven't ever gotten around to using any automated tools. As happens too frequently for me, I got distracted around the end of the auction and completely forgot to bid, and to make it worse, it sold for a steal (something like $15 or something, but I don't remember).

Win some, lose some I guess :P
__
Trevor

Lord Moz
August 6th, 2010, 10:29 PM
Looks like the machine sold, for full price too... was that you Eddie?
Hope the seller packs it well for whomever bought it. I had the guy who sold me my second pack the 'neck' extra carefully. Even when stationary, the monitor isn't really very solid on the machine.

I booted up my second 7300 and remembered/rediscovered that it has a 40MB drive in it with 75% space free still.
I am almost positive the other machine has a 20MB drive in it though.

Both of my machines suffer from a fair amount of "stiction" on the HDs. After sitting unpowered for any great length of time the platters will settle and need "unstuck."
With these machines being so unpleasant to open, toggling the power switch a few times seems to work, even if not the best for the power supply. When I powered up the 2nd machine today, the HD didn't spin up the first try, so I toggled the power just once and it spun up on the 2nd try. Both machines boot fine however, after un-sticking.

Any better fixes for sticktion?

__
Trevor

Ole Juul
August 7th, 2010, 01:33 AM
Any better fixes for sticktion?

There's not a lot you can do if you can't get inside the box easily, but you can try giving it a whack at the same time as turning it on - I've done that. It's probably too heavy, but twisting the box quickly as you hit the switch might be just enough. I've had that be mildly effective on a laptop with a sticky MFM drive. If you have the machine open, then a hair dryer can warm up the drive enough to giddiup. There is no permanent fix that I've heard of, and it only gets worse. I've heard of sticky drives going for a long time like that though. More experienced people here will hopefully be more informative.

EddieDX4
August 7th, 2010, 12:02 PM
Looks like the machine sold, for full price too... was that you Eddie?
Hope the seller packs it well for whomever bought it. I had the guy who sold me my second pack the 'neck' extra carefully. Even when stationary, the monitor isn't really very solid on the machine.

I booted up my second 7300 and remembered/rediscovered that it has a 40MB drive in it with 75% space free still.
I am almost positive the other machine has a 20MB drive in it though.

Both of my machines suffer from a fair amount of "stiction" on the HDs. After sitting unpowered for any great length of time the platters will settle and need "unstuck."
With these machines being so unpleasant to open, toggling the power switch a few times seems to work, even if not the best for the power supply. When I powered up the 2nd machine today, the HD didn't spin up the first try, so I toggled the power just once and it spun up on the 2nd try. Both machines boot fine however, after un-sticking.

Any better fixes for sticktion?

__
Trevor

Nope, that wasn't me. I wouldn't pay $400 for that machine, but I guess to someone the software was worth a whole lot. I never even sent an offer (my previous statement was in humor...because of the whole Back to the Future bit...) :)

I always wondered about the neck bit... How were these machines originally shipped by AT&T? Was there a foam "brace" surrounding the neck?

I'm sort of on a "portables" kick at the moment, trying to find a decent (e.g. none of the ones currently on eBay) IBM 5155 to modify. Part of the reason I didn't send an offer to the eBay seller for the UNIX PC is that I have space constraints. But I'm going to start listing a few of my machines on CL and eBay to make up space for one. Hopefully you'll still have one available. :)

Lord Moz
August 7th, 2010, 04:25 PM
I'm not really actively thining/selling anything right now, but there are a few machines/items that I have duplicates of because they were sold in bundles with things I wanted.
I really have zero use for 3 Color Computer 2s, or 4 Color Computer 3s for instance. Most things that I have multiples of are only duplicates, so it's not [i]too[/] bad... right? :p

I did just pick up a very beat up but working Kaypro 4 (as painted on the case) that seems to be an '83 model that I will likely try to sell after cleaning it up. With over 100 machines now (inc. multiples) and many accessories all stuffed into a ~1300 sq. ft. house, I'm having a few space issues as well :p
Gotta start building that extra room in the back yard...

So... about that portable kick you're on... I hear Kaypro's are nice...:cool:
__
Trevor

EddieDX4
August 9th, 2010, 12:24 PM
I'm not really actively thining/selling anything right now, but there are a few machines/items that I have duplicates of because they were sold in bundles with things I wanted.
I really have zero use for 3 Color Computer 2s, or 4 Color Computer 3s for instance. Most things that I have multiples of are only duplicates, so it's not [i]too[/] bad... right? :p

I did just pick up a very beat up but working Kaypro 4 (as painted on the case) that seems to be an '83 model that I will likely try to sell after cleaning it up. With over 100 machines now (inc. multiples) and many accessories all stuffed into a ~1300 sq. ft. house, I'm having a few space issues as well :p
Gotta start building that extra room in the back yard...

So... about that portable kick you're on... I hear Kaypro's are nice...:cool:
__
Trevor

Kaypros look interesting... I've never actually used one before. I've always thought they have a very industrial weather-proof look to them, like they could survive a windstorm.

Once I clear up some room, I'd like to revisit the idea of acquiring one of your UNIX PC's (If the timing is right and you happen to be wanting to part with one, that is).

Out of curiosity, what part of TX are you from? I lived in North Texas for 3 years (Denton, then Irving/Las Colinas). Mom and dad live in The Colony. Sister, her husband, and my niece and nephew live in Frisco. I was just down there in February, I'll be down there again possibly for Thanksgiving, if not Christmas.

Lord Moz
August 10th, 2010, 04:09 PM
I'm stationed at Fort Hood, which is right next to Killeen, between Waco and Austin.

As mentioned before, I'm not from here, just stuck here by the Army. There are better places to be, but there are worse as well.
I'll be glad when I can leave though... :p

Chances are high that the UNIX PC will be available later. As I mentioned, I have not really actively been trying to sell anything. It just happens that there are some parts that I'm willing to part with, and some of those that I know I /should/ part with.
I'm patient though (that's what we'll call it :D), and can wait for the right buyer...

__
Trevor

EddieDX4
August 10th, 2010, 04:15 PM
I'm stationed at Fort Hood, which is right next to Killeen, between Waco and Austin.

As mentioned before, I'm not from here, just stuck here by the Army. There are better places to be, but there are worse as well.
I'll be glad when I can leave though... :p



Oops, I knew that... Should have asked "What part of Texas do you live at?". I remember you mentioning you lived or were originally from the PacNW... :-}

leaknoil
August 24th, 2010, 06:53 PM
I wouldn't pay what this guy wants for a broken 3B1 but, if you want to see the very hard to find ethernet board I think I see it there in the back. http://cgi.ebay.com/AT-T-PC-7300-Unix-PC-Nice-/200503622062 His definition of 'nice' is different than mine.

Finding the driver disks and tcp/ip stuff might be interesting. I know about the collection of disk images on Bitsavers but, is there any other archives of 3b1 disk images or scanned manuals ? Bitsavers doesn't have any of the manuals and they probably should.

EddieDX4
August 24th, 2010, 07:17 PM
Remember this topic's unit? Well, it appears it has been relisted: http://cgi.ebay.com/VINTAGE-AT-T-UNIX-PC-w-SOFTWARE-/200511914685?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0

I wonder what happened...? I thought it was a bit weird that someone decided to just BIN it with more than a day left on it, and a "Make Offer" button available, so I'm guessing it was either a troll account, or someone with clicking fingers faster than his brains.

billdeg
August 24th, 2010, 07:18 PM
that's the internal modem.
http://vintagecomputer.net/att/7300/AT&T_PC-7300_rear-left.JPG

billdeg
August 24th, 2010, 07:22 PM
Here is the source of the files that I have installed on my UNIX PC's.
http://unixpc.taronga.com/STORE/
http://unixpc.taronga.com/STORE/README

billdeg
August 24th, 2010, 07:30 PM
Vintagecomptuer museum is on this forum, ...so mr vintagecomputer museum - how about a picture of Ebay auction 200503622062 that shows the item is actually working? $479 is a lot of bread without proof that it works or any software.

UPDATE
..I'm sorry, I see now that the "Hard Drive has been removed for security reasons"

I see....hmmmm

leaknoil
August 24th, 2010, 08:04 PM
that's the internal modem.
http://vintagecomputer.net/att/7300/AT&T_PC-7300_rear-left.JPG

Your looking at the wrong spot. First expansion card to the left. There's an AUI port on the expansion card. The expansion slot next to the combo card. A million years ago I had a 3b1 with one, a voice power card, and a maxed combo card. Ended up in the trash =(

mikerm
August 24th, 2010, 08:37 PM
I HATE when hard drives are removed from systems like that. Not only do they usually contain the software you need to run the thing, they probably are really hard to find/replace. I personally don't care about any personal or company information, as I delete that crap anyway. It's still one of my pet peeves.

I mean, right now, that machine is almost a giant paperweight. It's in non-working condition. I wouldn't plop down that much money for something that I don't even know if it works all the way, or if I probably won't ever get the right hard drive, or even worse, find the software, at all.

Apparently it uses an MFM hard drive, there's another large cost. Finding someone with a copy of the OS is going to be a real treat. I'm sorry folks, but you have to adjust your prices accordingly. And please, stop separating hard drives for "security reasons". The information on that drive is going to be severely out of date anyway (not to mention, nobody cares.).
</rant>

eBay Auction: http://cgi.ebay.com/AT-T-PC-7300-Unix-PC-Nice-/200503622062?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0

leaknoil
August 24th, 2010, 08:51 PM
I HATE when hard drives are removed from systems like that. Not only do they usually contain the software you need to run the thing, they probably are really hard to find/replace. I personally don't care about any personal or company information, as I delete that crap anyway. It's still one of my pet peeves
</rant>

eBay Auction: http://cgi.ebay.com/AT-T-PC-7300-Unix-PC-Nice-/200503622062?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0

It is frustrating but, I understand why. I got a 20 year old AS/400 box they didn't, thankfully, take the drives out of. Still, it was for a large manufacturing business. It actually still had the name, social security number, home address, and union membership and status of over 500 people on the drives. It would have been almost impossible to delete as it was just in a database that was part of their accounting program. They would have to delete each record individually in the software or have pretty serious as/400 skills. The machine hadn't even been turned on in 10 or more years. Nobody was left that even knew how to use it. Even though the info was over 20 years old all that info was just as sensitive as the day it went in there.

Unknown_K
August 24th, 2010, 08:54 PM
The HD could have been removed ages ago when the data was important, or the seller could be a recycler in an area where HD's need to be wiped or removed before resale. Sometimes the drive with software could be worth more then the machine they pulled it from (maximizing profit). I collect laptops and quite often the drive and more importantly the sled are removed, making the system useless until you find another custom mount.

If you don't like working on or completing old system, finding parts and old software, then you will pay a MINT to find 100% complete and working systems plus miss out on the fun of making an incomplete hulk into a functioning system.

Lord Moz
August 24th, 2010, 10:34 PM
For what it's worth, and to those interested, I do have copies of the system set (v3.51) and a few other packages for the PC 7300/3b1/UNIX PC and the original documentation. My offer before still stands to anyone interested regarding copies of the disks or docs.

I get frustrated when I find machines like that too, with various essential components removed. I especially like how he says he has no way to further test, but has a 2nd fully functional machine he's listing at about 2x the price.

It's really not difficult to swap the drive to the new machine for testing purposes, and after tested working, 1/2 height MFM drives aren't that expensive. He could sell it for a lot more if he did minimal testing.
Most of his auctions are listed at crazy prices with terrible pictures and matching descriptions. I seriously get the feeling he is using eBay as more of a showroom for his museum than as any serious marketplace.

I could be wrong though...
__
Trevor

leaknoil
August 24th, 2010, 10:48 PM
I could use copies of the docs for sure. I'm sure bitsavers.org would be a good place for them too. They have requirements on how they are scanned though. I'll take scans in any format ;)