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CP/M User
November 4th, 2005, 12:53 PM
I used to have so much fun learning about all the early rock based stuff (I used to listen to on the radio) from the 60s (in particular) - sometimes it was seventies & it was even better when I found a CD for them in my local Music store.

Some of those include:-

* Normie Rowes (an Aussie) - Shakin' All Over (bit hit here in Oz. Circa 1965).

* Garry Pucket & The Union Gap - for me this was a suprise, initally I heard "Over You" on the radio, got the CD I was overwhelmed with some of the other stuff (one of my early great buys IMO).

* Sweet - Ballroom Blitz (yes a 70s song), I brought the CD - but I don't ever play it, why?!? I heard this song so much on radio - I simply got sick of it - perhaps the only other savour on that album I have is Fox on the Run (not to be confused with Manfred Manns version - listed below). Initially I thought it was an Alice Cooper song or something - but anyway.

* Manfred Mann - I got two CDs which represent two different era's from Manfred Mann. The Paul Jones (1964-66) with Do-Wah-Diddy-Diddy, If you're gotta go - go now, and Pretty Flamingo (last big hit for Paul Jones before moving onto a move career). Mike D' Abo came in & did some amazing stuff - Mighty Quinn got me getting their CD (1966-69) I had no idea they did that cover of "Fox on the Run" & "Ragamiffin Man", so it was great to get those songs too! ;-)

* Herman's Hermits - Got this CD just out of the blue (when I used to live in the Country - Bendigo I was litterally cleaning the music shops of all the old groups, their probably wonderning what happened to me?) for this sort of stuff. I heard a little snippet of "Mrs Brown you've got a loverly daughter" so I wondered what else they did. The suprise song which captured me was one of their last hits (well I think it was a big hit here) "My Sentimental Friend" - cause I know this stuff, but had no idea they performed! Great Stuff.

* The Hollies - Another Herman's Hermits but this time I knew they sang "Bus Stop" which was good enough for me. But then I heard "The Air That I Breath" instantly I reconised that Guitar - again wonderful song, had no idea they did. I had to go out of my way with my Mum 'bout "He Ain't Heavy, He's my Brother" telling her The Hollies had a bit hit with it.

* The Honeycombs (okay I'm going through my CD collection now - alphabetically! ;-) I was amazed to find a CD for this group, I got a hold of it - since I knew they performed "Have I the Right" again another big hit. Don't really know much else from this group, but some of it is good! Never seen another CD for them (though I haven't really been lookin' - which might obsecure the results).

* B J Thomas - I heard "Hoooked on Feeling" and strangely enough found a CD one day which looking through a pile of CDs discounted (obviously to have a spring clean). At the time I thought "Raindrops keep falling on my Head" was a bit of a dag, but I've kinda grown to like it. Some of his other stuff like "Mamma" is great.

* John Lennon - (who can dispute his solo), I heard "Mind Games" on the radio & decided it was time to get it.

* The Monkeys - can't remember what made me get them, think it was their big hit "Last Train to Clarksville" oh no, it was actually "I'm not you're stepping stone" which I heard on radio. Okay they weren't exactly a formal group, but the tunes were catchy & came with other lesser big hit tunes.

* Johnny Rivers - (yes I dedicated a thread to him), early on I got his Greatest Hits - just to have "Summer Rain", forgot about him singing "Poor Side of Town","Mountain of love" though great songs.

* The Animals - "House of the Rising Sun" for one CD, "Don't Bring me Down" for a second, in-between that I got another with their late 60s stuff - "Sky Pilot", "San Fransicso Nights" etc. This was how I ended up with 3 of their CDs (within a short period of time). The first CD (with some of their very early stuff - with the original group) had their other hits like "It's my Life" & "Please Don't let me be misunderstood" - again were songs I didn't realise were their's. Great to have though! ;-)

One More

* The Master's Apprentices (an Aussie group) which had "It's because I love you" which is perhaps their best known hit, they performed in UK at Abbey Road in the early 1970s & I believe John Lennon heard it - stating this'll be a big hit. Inspired me to get their CD - which all sorts of interesting stuff.

Anyway I leave it at that - might come back some other time & add more, if anyone has a favourite group of something which inspired you to get the CD & be mind blown by their other stuff as well, then do tell! Even if you want to keep it small.

Cheers,
CP/M User.

Terry Yager
November 4th, 2005, 01:49 PM
Anyway I leave it at that - might come back some other time & add more, if anyone has a favourite group of something which inspired you to get the CD & be mind blown by their other stuff as well, then do tell! Even if you want to keep it small.

Favorite late '60s - early '70s group = Frank Zappa & the Mothers! I never was much interested in "Pop" music at the time, my leanings were more towards hard-rock & acid-rock (psychedelic) music back then.

My ex-wife used to be a big Johny Rivers fan, but I've never cared much for his music.

I love the song "Ballroom Blitz" as performed by Dr. Hook & the Medicine Show (written by Shel Silverstein, IIRC)

I also love Manfred Mann & the Earth Band, especially thier covers of Bruce Springstein songs (Spirits in the Night, Born to Run, etc). The Boss has a tendency to slur the words very badly, but MM can shine thru all that crap.

The Monkees used to be "Required Viewing" back around '71, '72-or so. You just couldn't be considered "kewl" unless you watched them on a regular basis.

Of course, Gary Puckett as well as Herman's Hermits were also considered "required listening" "(Mrs. Brown You've Got A Lovely Daughter" is still one of my all-time favorites, to this day. I first heard/sang it around the campfire at "Summer Camp", accompanied by an old acoustic gituar).

As for The Hollies, the only song that comes to mind is "Long Cool Woman in a Black Dress", which I also love. (Did they do "Lola", which also has special meaning for me)?

John Lennon? What can I say...???

The Animals? Love all of thier stuff...

--T

CP/M User
November 4th, 2005, 02:37 PM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> Anyway I leave it at that - might come back some other time & add
> more, if anyone has a favourite group of something which inspired you
> to get the CD & be mind blown by their other stuff as well, then do tell!
> Even if you want to keep it small.

> Favorite late '60s - early '70s group = Frank Zappa & the Mothers! I
> never was much interested in "Pop" music at the time, my leanings
> were more towards hard-rock & acid-rock (psychedelic) music at the
> time. My ex-wife used to be a big Johny Rivers fan, but I've never
> cared much for his music.

> I love the song "Ballroom Blitz" as performed by Dr. Hook & the
> Medicine Show (written by Shel Silverstein, IIRC)

> I also love Manfred Mann & the Earth Band, especially thier covers of
> Bruce Springstien songs (Spirits in the Night, Born to Run, etc).

> The Monkees used to be "Required Viewing" back around '71, '72-or
> so. You just coyuldn't be considered "kewl" unless you watched them
> on a regular basis.

> Of course, Gary Puckett as well as Herman's Hermits were also
> considered "required listening" "(Mrs. Brown You've Got A Lovely
> Daughter" is still one of my all-time favorites, to this day).

> As for The Hollies, the only song that comes to mind is "Long Cool
> Woman in a Black Dress", which I also love. (Did they do "Lola", which
> also has special meaning for me)?

> John Lennon? What can I say...???

> The Animals? Love all of thier stuff...

Yeah, I stuffed up big time on the Title of this thread. It's not really obscure, well maybe some of it is - but John Lennon isn't obscure, neither is The Animals - Eric Burdon might have me shot if he found out I put him in a list of obscure music.

It should have been called "Yeah I remember that Song... Didn't realise they performed it" - if you can change the title to reflect that, then please do.

"Lola" was one of The Kinks big hits (early 1970s) - with Ray Davies. Which was another CD I'd got for that reason. Another big Kinks song I discovered when I got their CD was "Waterloo Sunset" truely well written & preformed, never realised it was The Kinks though - usuaully I just associated them with "You Really Got me", "All Day & All of the night" & "Sunny Afternoon".

Obviously since my original topic was a huge one, I've got many bands. This was how I initally started collecting CDs. I built a few more performers since I've moved to the big city, but I've been focusing more on the original albums from groups. One such group is the Byrds - for many years I just had their Greatest Hits album which was a CD of their original 1967 Album for the Greatest Hits. It's very limited in comparision when you get stuck into the albums - which is why there's more Best Of type stuff out there like the Essential Byrds etc which I'd probably recommend for those who are dinkie die fans of the group.
I think upto "Chestnut Mare" was one of the last real gems from their Untitled album in 1970. Course they had the "Byrdmanix" after that which was considered as one of their worst albums & "Father Along" which is interesting, but there's not much which really stands out - still "Father Along" is good. If I were to compare it with something like "Ballard of Easy Rider" though I'd certainally pick "Ballard of Easy Rider" over it.

But just getting back to the topic at hand, it doesn't have to be about one generation of groups at all. You could pick something entirely different from an earlier period (it could be a piece from one of your favourite composers - or it could be about an album based on a composer which was well preformed for example), or something from an entirely different period (like I said). For instance I didn't realise REM sang "Everybody Hurts" until someone told me - I thought it was so cool that I got their early Greatest Hits (unfortunately I didn't really enjoy it for some reason) - which sounds weird since some of their later stuff it very good IMO.

Course if anyone wants to know who sings what from the 1960s I might know (I'm kinda endeavouring to know more about the later psychelledic stuff - and have been looking at some Garage stuff as well).

CP/M User.

Terry Yager
November 4th, 2005, 05:43 PM
Oh yeah, The Kinks...I remember now. The mother of my firstborn was named "Lola" (and was (coincidentally) a lesbian as well). The song has special meaning for me.

If you like The Byrds, you gotta give a listen to "The Flying Burrito Brothers" (talk about obscure...).

http://ebni.com/byrds/spfbb1.html

--T

Terry Yager
November 4th, 2005, 06:05 PM
I heard The Burritos out in California,
Could fly...higher than The Byrds.
Roger McGuinn had a 12-string guitar,
It was like nothing I'd ever heard...

...Yet another even more obscure "Byrds" connection?

http://www.ibiblio.org/jimmy/mcguinn/

--T

Terry Yager
November 4th, 2005, 07:56 PM
Yet another even more, more obscure reference (with Charlie Manson overtones?)...


Helter-Skealter in a summer swealter,
The Byrds flew off from the fallout shelter.
Eight Miles High and falling fast...

--T

Terry Yager
November 4th, 2005, 08:35 PM
Rock-N-Roll trivia question:

Roger McGuinn and The Byrds have been inducted (collectively & individually) into the Hall Of Fame, but...

What group has never even been nominated, dispite thier having recorded 17 Platinum Albums? Hint: They're my favorite hometown band.

--T

CP/M User
November 4th, 2005, 08:52 PM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> Oh yeah, The Kinks...I remember now. The mother of my firstborn
> was named "Lola" (and was (coincidentally) a lesbian as well). The
> song has special meaning for me.

> If you like The Byrds, you gotta give a listen to "The Flying Burrito
> Brothers" (talk about obscure...).

I've actually got some of the Flying Burrito Bros. songs. Got no actual albums of theirs, but I've got some of the stuff they did with Gram Parsons & two songs they did while Gene Clark was shortly with them ("Tried So Hard" - which was actually a song Clark wrote initally with the Gosdin Brothers in 1967 & "Here Tonight" which I don't know too much about - except Clark is featured on it).

CP/M User
November 4th, 2005, 09:17 PM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> Rock-N-Roll trivia question:

> Roger McGuinn and The Byrds have been inducted (collectively &
> individually) into the Hall Of Fame, but...

> What group has never even been nominated, dispite thier having
> recorded "17 Platinum Albums"? Hint: They're my favorite
> hometown band.

Well I'm at a slight disadvantage cause I don't know where you're from
(unless that's the answer). Obviously it's an American group, Don Mclean
hasn't had 17 albums (studio stuff I'm referening too & discarding the
Best Of's... based albums). To me the closest group this comes to
is "Chicago" my book states they had 12 Platinum Albums, though this
book came out in 1992/3 - they might of had a few more since then. And
the Album charts seem to reflect quite a bit from them.

My understanding of the Hall of Fame has a lot to do with reconition a
group recieves after they stopped producing albums. I think there's a
time factor involved, though some groups e.g. The Who which were
producing stuff as late as 1982 were inducted into the Hall of Fame in
1990. Some seem to wait a lot longer before this happens (perhaps in line
of their success - which you'd think would work in Chicago's favour).
Perhaps since they were producing Platum stuff in recent times, that may
suggest they're been held off until it's noticed they haven't been elected.
Not quite sure how it works the ol' Hall of Fame, maybe people elect
them. e.g. The Tornadoes were a very well regared Instrumental group
(like the Shadows) basically because of the success of "Telstar" which
became the first UK track to top both sides of the Atlantic.
Everyone seems to praise the group for this & must admit it's still
interesting to hear to this day - it really hasn't aged much except due to
the fact that perhaps it's been done in Mono which has perhaps done most
of the damage - but even now it sounds good.

CP/M User.

CP/M User
November 5th, 2005, 02:27 AM
> I also love Manfred Mann & the Earth Band, especially thier covers of
> Bruce Springstein songs (Spirits in the Night, Born to Run, etc). The
> Boss has a tendency to slur the words very badly, but MM can shine
> thru all that crap.

What I forgot to point out (until I played one of my Hollies CDs tonight) is
one of their songs was written by Bruce Springsteen). Cause the Hollies
performed the song in 1975 right around the time of Born to Run &
Manfred Mann's Earth Band - I used to like that "Blinded by the Light" but
now I'm not so sure - it's fine if I compare it with some of the disco stuff
from the 70s!
The Hollies in particular preform "Sandy (4th of July, Ashbury Park)"
which is quite good - it sounds like one of those romantic songs you'd
play down by the lake! ;-)

CP/M User.

Terry Yager
November 5th, 2005, 05:10 AM
Well I'm at a slight disadvantage cause I don't know where you're from

Well if I told you that, it would give away the answer. OK, I'll narrow it down to Michigan, USA.

ANOTHER HINT: Rolling Stone Magazine has declared them to be "the worst band of all time"...

--T

CP/M User
November 5th, 2005, 12:21 PM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> Well if I told you that, it would give away the answer. OK, I'll narrow it
> down to Michigan, USA.

> ANOTHER HINT: Rolling Stone Magazine has declared them to be "the
> worst band of all time"...

Nope, still stumped tried searching for this in google, I found 3 peformers from Michigan:-

* The Supremes
* Bob Seger & The Silver Bullet Band
* Stevie Wonder

The page in question mentioned Bob Seger's 7 Platnum Albums (so I don't know where the other 10 would have came from).

I don't know too much about The Supremes, but to me were only around for a brief period, or were they around for a long period minus Diana Ross producing Platnum Stuff. And didn't you say this was one of your favourite groups?!?

Now Stevie Wonder is a thing in himself, born in 1950 (blind of course) - by the age of 12 had his first hit Fingertips (which I've never heard), a couple of years later had some more hits after incorporating the Motown style. If anyone has 17 albums it might be this guy, started at an early age & was still going in the 1980s. But why would Rolling Stone dub him as being the worst band - when it's clear he's another Solo genus.
Hard to tell if this guy would have been the equivalent of Chicago's Sam Cooke which manage to kick on - avoiding the psychotic girlfriends which tend to shoot you.

Yes I think I know where your coming from with the Hall of Fame. It could indeed be a cultural issue - anybody should have the same amount of rights. It's hard to believe that in shows like the Original Star Trek - they treat everyone as equals, though their only in the 22/3 centries & while we're closing in on them it's the older folk (not all surely) I see which ties culture issues into racial issues.

CP/M User.

carlsson
November 5th, 2005, 01:30 PM
Also, I would not categorize Stevie Wonder (or not even the Supremes) as rock'n'roll, so no matter how many albums they sold, they should not be in the rock'n'roll hall of fame. Maybe some other hall of fame though.

Terry Yager
November 5th, 2005, 04:04 PM
Also, I would not categorize Stevie Wonder (or not even the Supremes) as rock'n'roll, so no matter how many albums they sold, they should not be in the rock'n'roll hall of fame. Maybe some other hall of fame though.

Is there an R&B HOF?

--T

Terry Yager
November 5th, 2005, 04:15 PM
Most of the MoTown groups were Michigan natives, not to mention quite a few real rockers (Brownsville Station, Mitch Ryder, Ted Nugent, etc).

Seeger was finally inducted last year (his 3rd nomination). Kid Rock presented him with the award.

Even though they're considered the worst of all time, 17 platinum! Somebody bought all those records...

FINAL HINT: Thier initials are GFR (or GFRR, depending how ya spell it).

--T

ribbets
November 5th, 2005, 04:37 PM
Has to be GRAND FUNK RAILROAD

Terry Yager
November 5th, 2005, 06:53 PM
Mark Farner, Don Brewer, Mel Shacher...

Of course, I don't necessarily consider 'em my Homies. The only time I ever met Farner, he needed a serious attitude adjustment. I went for him, but "Big Bruce" was closer, so all I got to do was watch...

--T

CP/M User
November 5th, 2005, 08:11 PM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> Mark Farner, Don Brewer, Mel Shacher...

> Of course, I don't necessarily consider 'em my Homies. The only time I
> ever met Farner, he needed a serious attitude adjustment. I went for
> him, but "Big Bruce" was closer, so all I got to do was watch...

Of course, how stipid of me, you did say you were into the Metal thingy.
I've heard of the group but never heard them (if you know what I mean).
Don't think they had a large impact here though - even if they did have
17 Platinum Albums.

But what made me think you liked The Supremes? (must of been
somebody else). For some reason though they made it into my
Encyclopedia of Rock book under the Soul section. Sam Cooke would
have been the building blocks for this (even though he was killed at a
very young age in 1964).

CP/M User.

Terry Yager
November 5th, 2005, 08:24 PM
But, I do like The Supremes. I was raised on "Soul" music...

--T

CP/M User
November 5th, 2005, 08:38 PM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> But, I do like The Supremes. I was raised on "Soul" music...

Oh okay! :-)

CP/M User.

carlsson
November 6th, 2005, 11:36 AM
I wonder, does any group label themselves as fusion metal or maybe black death soul?

CP/M User
November 6th, 2005, 12:07 PM
"carlsson" wrote:

> I wonder, does any group label themselves as 'fusion metal' or
> maybe 'black death soul'?

I remember a clip from one of the early music shows which did had some
guy (insert name here if you know) do an interview with a early Pink
Floyd - with Sid Barrett at the helm. The interviewer couldn't get over
how "loud" they were & Barrett explained that they like to sound loud -
would that make them a "loud" rock band I wonder?!? ;-)

Another interesting character is the young Jimmy Page. He sounds like a
nice fella - yet he blazes his Guitar away!
Kinda reminds me of Alice Cooper. It's a bit strange seeing this - cause
then you go to other heavy metal people like Ozzy Osbourne who are just
the complete opposite!

CP/M User.

Terry Yager
November 6th, 2005, 02:48 PM
I've never heard any pre-Led Zepplin Page, but I am familliar with his post-LZ solo work. (I always thought he was a better gitaurist than Plant, but some of my friends used to disagree, which was the basis of many a (stoned) discussion in the wee hours).

--T

ribbets
November 6th, 2005, 03:01 PM
Saw Tull and Joplin in concert , I duh! think it was around 1970. But the warm-up band was really good Black Sabbath.

Terry Yager
November 6th, 2005, 03:42 PM
Saw Tull and Joplin in concert , I duh! think it was around 1970. But the warm-up band was really good Black Sabbath.

Never had the pleasure, but I did meet JJ at a party in Ann Arbor, MI, around 1969. I didn't get to shake her hand, as her hands were otherwise occupied. She was holding a bottle of Jose Quervo in her right, and a bag full of lemons in the left. The party, BTW, was to celebrate the release of Brownsville Station's (guests of honor) first single. I don't recall the song right now, but it was before Smokin' in the Boy's Room. I used to get invited to a lot of such parties during my mis-spent youth, mainly because I had a good connection to some good micro-dot acid. (The chemist's (alchemist?) baby brother was one of my best friends). I could get quantites of ten-thousand for around 10 cents a hit, so I was rather popular back then.

--T

CP/M User
November 6th, 2005, 08:01 PM
"Terry Yager" wrote:

> I've never heard any pre-Led Zepplin Page, but I am familliar with his
> post-LZ solo work. (I always thought he was a better gitaurist than
> Plant, but some of my friends used to disagree, which was the basis of
> many a (stoned) discussion in the wee hours).

Two bits of pre-Zepplin Page stuff I've got comes in the form of my
Crispian St. Peters album - "Follow Me (The Pied Piper)". His work on this
album is limited to the extent that he was used on one of the sessions.
The track I believe he is featured on is "Jilly Honey" which has a small
Guitar solo which seems to sound Page (there were another 5 guitar
players - including "St. Peters" himself, so it looks stickly stuck to the
sessions they performed in). Of course if anyone else remembers "St.
Peters" he'll only perhaps be remembered for the hits he had with "You
were on my Mind", "The Pied Piper" & "Changes" (not sure how big a
hit "Changes" was, but it's a fascinating track & I've definitely heard the
song being played here on radio - though it might of been a big hit here).

Page really got moving when he was with "The Yardbirds" which was also
in 1966. If anyone here has The Yardbirds - Roger The engineer (over
under sideways down) album with some bonus - one of them includes an
impressive "Happenings Ten Years Time Ago" (which I think was featured
in the movie "Blow Up" - with David Hemmings), this song features Page
on Guitar and my album also has the B-Side to it "Psycho Daisies" which,
again includes Page. I've also got some Page stuff on the BBC Sessions
of the Yardbirds, which is quite impressive.

Do you read or hear 'bout when the Yardbirds broke up in the middle of
some tour (Scandinavia I think) in July 1968, Page was left with the group
name, some contracts to fulfil & some gigs to perform (in Scandinavia) -
so Page got a band quickly together (incl. Plant) & performed as "The
New Yardbirds". This was shall I say how Led Zeppelin started. I think
some of that "New Yardbirds" material might be interesting to get a hold
of - should look to see if there's any albums.

CP/M User.

carlsson
November 7th, 2005, 03:07 PM
By the way, you heard that Led Zeppelin was awarded the 2005 Polar Prize?

Terry Yager
November 7th, 2005, 03:20 PM
By the way, you heard that Led Zeppelin was awarded the 2005 Polar Prize?

What's a Polar Prize?

--T

carlsson
November 7th, 2005, 09:28 PM
It is a prize invented by Stikkan Andersson of Polar Music (Sweden), the record company who made all of ABBA's records among other. Since 1992, they award two prizes per year; one to a classic performer and one to a popular music performer.

To be exact, it is the 2006 prize that Led Zeppelin (along with Russian conductor Valerij Gergiev) was awarded. The amount is one million Swedish crowns, about US$130,000 and the ceremony is on May 15th next year.

Previous winners include names like Paul McCartney, Dizzy Gillespie, Quincy Jones, Elton John, Bruce Springsteen, Ray Charles, Ravi Shankar, Stevie Wonder, Bob Dylan, Burt Bacharach, Robert Moog, Karl-Heinz Stockhausen and Miriam Makeba, to mention the best known ones. It is by the way the first time a group has been awarded the prize.

CP/M User
November 7th, 2005, 10:52 PM
"carlsson" wrote:

> To be exact, it is the 2006 prize that Led Zeppelin (along with Russian
> conductor Valerij Gergiev) was awarded. The amount is one million
> Swedish crowns, about US$130,000 and the ceremony is on May 15th
> next year.

> It is by the way the first time a group has been awarded the prize.

So does each performer from Led Zeppelin collect $130,000 US each, or do they have to share it amonst them (I'd imagine the later).

Be nice if it was US$130,000 for Page, US$130,000 for Plant, etc etc! ;-) They might prefer the ol' "" instead!

CP/M User.

carlsson
November 7th, 2005, 11:39 PM
They have to share the amount, or play poker about it.

By the way, I searched music resellers on Internet if there exists any arrangements of Led Zeppelin (mainly Stairway to Heaven) for concert band (wind orchestra). I didn't find any, except one Australian arranger who offered big band arrangements.

Then I begun looking for MIDI files to possibly use as a basis for an own arrangement (I do this in small scale as a hobby). I found several different sequenced versions, including the one on this site:

http://www.gtweb.org/media/toc.media.html

It is the first time I hear a MIDI file recorded as if it was live, with slight delays between notes, a few wrong notes here and there and so on. Rather charming, but unexpected.

carlsson
November 19th, 2005, 12:03 PM
A few years ago I bought a bunch of LPs at a store who have a permanent sale on many of their LPs. Dunno where they get them from though. Most are in very good shape, A++ to use eBay language. Some of the records I haven't yet even played.

Tonight I brought out one album by The Association: Stop Your Motor (1971). It turns out this was one of the (big??) folk rock bands, and it was their last record.

http://www.stylusmagazine.com/review.php?ID=1309
http://www.mp3.com/albums/23635/reviews.html
http://www.ccmusic.com/item.cfm?itemid=CCM03852
http://store.milesofmusic.com/Compact_Discs/A/Association/Page_1/28845_____CD.html

and so on. Rather OK so far, although I prefer a little more horn rock style a'la BST and later Chicago, or my personal favourites The Ides of March (also from Chicago), which happened to be on Warner Bros in the early 1970'ties like the Association, one of the reasons I picked in my pack of "buy ten, pay for one".

Terry Yager
November 19th, 2005, 12:15 PM
Blood, Sweat & Tears and Chicago are both great examples of "Chicago-Style Blues" which seems to have a heavy emphasis on the horn section. (My own personal preference is more along the lines of "Memphis Style" (Beale Street Blues)).

--T

Terry Yager
November 19th, 2005, 12:25 PM
Yes, BTW, I have done there, been that, of the whole "Highway 41" thang. You start out on Nw'awlins, and end up in Chi-Town, stopping at every joint along the way, especially St. Louis, Memphis, etc...
(Not to be confused with the "Duval Crawl, which takes place on Duval Street in Key West, Fla.).

--T

carlsson
November 20th, 2005, 11:22 AM
A green back dollar no' (?) is lighter than a pound,
but in London it'll buy anything around.
Now anything in London and Stockholm too,
but if you don't watch out, you know it's gonna buy you.

Either I don't understand the lyrics completely, or it seems these guys were not entirely familiar with the monetary systems used in Europe. I get the feeling that neither USD nor GBP were common currencies in Sweden around 1970-71. But cute to hear a reference to somewhere close to me.

CP/M User
November 20th, 2005, 02:04 PM
"carlsson" wrote:

> Tonight I brought out one album by The Association: Stop Your Motor
> (1971). It turns out this was one of the (big??) folk rock bands, and it
> was their last record.

Yes, I don't mind the Association - I think their a very poppy kinda group myself, but I do see some folk with their harmonies - but their beat suggests something else. I've only heard a couple of their hit songs - so perhaps this album has a change of rhythm for them (e.g. The Byrds were notorious, at first they had their Folk roots, then experimentation crept in with Psychelledic & even country - they even played around by fusing both of these together). If anyone is after a Byrds album which has a bit of everything in it, try listening to their "Younger than Yesturday" album. I think it's quite good - it's a bit of a pity it's missing Gene Clark though - one of the Jewels from the Byrds which left early, though he went on to do some great stuff with the Gosdin Brothers as well as The Dillard & Clark Expedition. The "Mind Gardens" track has to be one of the oddest tracks from the Byrds - found on their "Younger Than Yesturday", I usually flick past it (through the wonders of CD technology! ;-) the extended edition is made up for this by including some adding some wonderful tracks like "It's Happens each Day" & "Lady Friend" - also an early version (the B-side single to "Lady Friend") in "Old John Robinson", which was souped up & included on the "Notorious Byrd Brothers" album.

> and so on. Rather OK so far, although I prefer a little more horn rock
> style a'la BST and later Chicago, or my personal favourites The Ides of
> March (also from Chicago), which happened to be on Warner Bros in
> the early 1970'ties like the Association, one of the reasons I picked in
> my pack of "buy ten, pay for one".

Yeah, I don't mind BST & Chicago (Transit Authority) - but I by into all kinds of music. Personally I love the folky feel, but there are times where I need some change in music & these are part of the alternatives I've got when I need them! ;-)

CP/M User.

carlsson
November 22nd, 2005, 06:36 AM
I think tonight I might put on a record with Laura Brannigan or even Kylie Minogue (which also were the ones I picked in the pack of random 10).

ribbets
November 22nd, 2005, 06:57 AM
Is this the album with Gloria, Spanish Eddie and Ti Amo on it

carlsson
November 22nd, 2005, 09:47 AM
No, yes and no in that order. It is the "Hold Me" album, with a cover of Forever Young.

ribbets
November 22nd, 2005, 12:06 PM
No, yes and no in that order. It is the "Hold Me" album, with a cover of Forever Young.
I think I've got the greatest hits cassette..

Search for The Debbie Meyer Show sometime on the net and give it a listen

CP/M User
December 12th, 2007, 11:26 PM
Not sure if anyone has come across the Gene Clark album from 1974 - "No Other". I haven't played it all that much though because I felt the original album was doing too much with Gene Clark (with the exception of a couple of tracks - "Silver Raven" and "From a Silver Phial"), however I've got the Remastered & Expanded edition of "No other" and found that if I substituted the alternative versions of "Life's Greatest Fool", "No Other", "Some Misunderstanding" and "Lady of the North" the album gets interesting. The only really odd track seems to be "Strengths of Strings", though it has it's moments. Unsure if Gene Clark did an alternative version of "Strengths of Strings", the other alternatives basically simplify into a folkier song - it's a pity the CD can only hold 75 minutes of information (or this one does - the songs are quite long particularly "SOS" and "Some Misunderstanding so while some of the alternative songs are shorter than the album version their definitely of reasonible length - the shortest songs are just over 3 minutes!).

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carlsson
December 13th, 2007, 02:49 AM
Gene Clark thus had nothing to gain from entering the Eurovision Song Contest, as it has a limitation of max 3 minutes per song. :-)

CP/M User
December 13th, 2007, 01:31 PM
carlsson wrote:

Gene Clark thus had nothing to gain from entering the Eurovision Song Contest, as it has a limitation of max 3 minutes per song. :-)

Oh well it really depends what Gene had up his sleve, in the 70s Gene perhaps wrote songs which had a little bit more substance, though I can say that Gene also had the tendancy of reviving and/or reproducing a song where the length of it changes. A classic in that sense is a song he first started on in 1967 as featured on the "Gene Clark and the Gosdin Brothers" album is "Tried so Hard" which ran for 2:20 secs. Later Clark revived the song in 1970 and the Flying Burrito Brothers performed it (with Gene on Baking Vocals), the song I feel in both cases is very good, though The Flying Burrito Brothers version has more substance and runs just over 3 minutes.

I feel the real issue with Gene Clark though was travelling around via Aeroplane, a few people I feel dispute this as the true reason for why Clark left the Byrds around 1966, though the music for which he produced and performed I feel is of a high standard though didn't get a lot of reconition at the time because of the way Clark went about his business of being heard. In a way though I feel Clark was quite influential in the way he exploited folk as well as fusing Country and Rock together would have certainally inspired groups like the Byrds to do this as well as bring groups like the Flying Burrito Brothers and The Eagles in existance, though I'd have to say there was probably a process of groups to happen to create future groups.