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Toto
July 21st, 2003, 01:16 AM
Hi !

I'm a french guy and i wonder if 'vintage' has special meanings.
I found in a dictionary it means 'old' of course, but isn't there any other i didn't get ?

And by the way, is my 386 pc one of those 'vintage computers' ?

Erik
July 21st, 2003, 05:54 AM
Vintage does just mean "old" but it has connotations of old with some retained value.

Vintage items are just a subset of old items.

As for your 386, it depends on the machine and who you ask. Some folks consider pretty much any running machine over 10 years old to be "vintage" and others are far more discriminating in what they think still holds value (not necessarily monetary value, either).

If you still value your old 386 then it is a vintage machine!

Erik

CP/M User
July 29th, 2003, 05:12 AM
"Erik" wrote in message:

> Vintage does just mean "old" but it has connotations of
> old with some retained value.

> Vintage items are just a subset of old items.

> As for your 386, it depends on the machine and who
> you ask. Some folks consider pretty much any running
> machine over 10 years old to be "vintage" and others
> are far more discriminating in what they think still holds
> value (not necessarily monetary value, either).

> If you still value your old 386 then it is a vintage machine!

386's well?, most people who perhaps use one, might be able to
get it to do what it does. But most people who still have one
(like me), use it as a hobbyist machine. For the record it can
do a bit of internet surfing, so in that sense it may not be!

But hey it's been discussed in comp.sys.ibm.pc.classic, so it's
welcomed here! :-) (oops, sorry Erik I was discussing the
options with the original poster Toto! (-:)

Here's a puzzle for you Erik, the Amstrad PCW16 is less than
10 years ol', yet uses a Z80 & has a GUI (which looks like a
mac). It was introduced in 1994! :-) Oh well, I guess it falls
into that category since it uses older hardware.

Cheers.

Erik
July 29th, 2003, 06:01 AM
Here's a puzzle for you Erik, the Amstrad PCW16 is less than
10 years ol', yet uses a Z80 & has a GUI (which looks like a
mac). It was introduced in 1994! :-) Oh well, I guess it falls
into that category since it uses older hardware.


I think it falls into the category just for the coolness factor of pasting a GUI on top of a Z80 when there were more powerful chips around.

Besides, it's just about 10 years old by now, isn't it? What's a few months amongst friends! :D

Erik

CP/M User
August 3rd, 2003, 03:39 AM
"Erik" wrote in message:

Hi Erik,

>> Here's a puzzle for you Erik, the Amstrad PCW16 is less than
>> 10 years ol', yet uses a Z80 & has a GUI (which looks like a
>> Mac). It was introduced in 1994! :-) Oh well, I guess it falls
>> into that category since it uses older hardware.

> I think it falls into the category just for the coolness factor of
> pasting a GUI on top of a Z80 when there were more powerful
> chips around.

> Besides, it's just about 10 years old by now, isn't it? What's a
> few months amongst friends! :D

Heh! Well I don't exactly have one of those machines myself, but
well it's part of the PCW family of business machines, even
though this uses a GUI instead of CP/M (I think - I'll have to
recheck).

The Amstrad CPC computers also have a GUI called DES (Destop
Environment System - even some applications were written for
this). This came in a number of forms, either Disk (the Public
Domain version, or commercial version) or ROM. The beauty with
the ROM version was that it could bypass the bootup to BASIC
(on power up), which mean't you had DES as soon as you turned
on your computer. It's not like these newer IBMs which take time
to bootup Windows from the Hard Disks! ;-)

Cheers.