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per
August 7th, 2011, 12:11 PM
I have been interested in Youtube user "vomitsaw"s (http://www.youtube.com/user/vomitsaw) chassis-mods, especially the ones where he buildt entire NES machines into old toasters. I was so inspired that I actually made one myself just recently.

The idea is simple enough; you just replace the internals of a toaster with a NES cirquit board, and find some way to mount everything securely into place. This may sound easy enough, but there is quite a lot of practical work involved. How much work depends from toaster to toaster, and basically how you want the final product to function. The two major factors is the toaster size, and which kind of trigger mechanism it has (if you decide to use it). I had quite limited posibilities, so I had to go with our old toaster, which is quite small and uses an electromagnet-based trigger mechanism.

The final Nintoaster works just fine, allthough the trigger is not always locking properly. I'm using 5V for the electromagnet, which may be too little compared to the original design. When the trigger locks, however, it stays locked.

carlsson
August 7th, 2011, 03:02 PM
So, will that mechanism save the connector from additional wear and tear? I've come to learn the NES is the cartridge based console or computer that most often suffers from a worn out connector. Some remove it and cook to clean and shrink it, some just replace with a new part as those are still manufactured by 3rd party. It is thought the original push into place mechanism on NES is what wears it out more than other cartridge connectors.

Personally I sawed and filed down a Sega Megadrive (Genesis) cartridge tonight in order to accomodate a loose MSX cartridge board, but that is a completely different story.

per
August 7th, 2011, 03:20 PM
So, will that mechanism save the connector from additional wear and tear? I've come to learn the NES is the cartridge based console or computer that most often suffers from a worn out connector. Some remove it and cook to clean and shrink it, some just replace with a new part as those are still manufactured by 3rd party. It is thought the original push into place mechanism on NES is what wears it out more than other cartridge connectors.

Personally I sawed and filed down a Sega Megadrive (Genesis) cartridge tonight in order to accomodate a loose MSX cartridge board, but that is a completely different story.

The original connector could not be used here for several reasons: 1. As you mention, it's of terrible quality and it barely worked in the first place, 2. It simply wouldn't fit due to the space restrictions and 3. It's not designed for top-loading usage. What I ended up doing was to use a connector desoldered from a GameGenie cartridge extender.

facattack
August 18th, 2011, 04:52 PM
When I read the thread title I somehow thought "toaster" as in a video editing suite. I was like "an NES that can edit video? NENEAT!" :D

lutiana
August 18th, 2011, 04:59 PM
Are you using the plunger as an on/off switch?

per
August 19th, 2011, 06:48 AM
Are you using the plunger as an on/off switch?

Yes. As I mentoned, it works most of the time by just pushing it down normally, and it works about always when you hold the plunger down for about a second after pushing it down.

Here is a picture of the device in action:

barythrin
August 19th, 2011, 07:23 AM
Hm.. didn't think about that circuitry behind keeping the handle down. Guess it's not much fun if it pops your game out after 5 minutes? I'm surprised that the cartridges are so high and wouldn't just fall into the unit. Did you mount the slot somewhere higher? Did you take any pictures while you made it?

per
August 19th, 2011, 08:13 AM
Hm.. didn't think about that circuitry behind keeping the handle down. Guess it's not much fun if it pops your game out after 5 minutes? I'm surprised that the cartridges are so high and wouldn't just fall into the unit. Did you mount the slot somewhere higher? Did you take any pictures while you made it?

It's rather simple. The problem isn't keeping it down after it locks, but to make it lock. The mechanics are based around an electromagnetic latch, and mechanical switches. When the lever is pulled down, it closes the two switches, and current will flow to the cirquit board and the electromagnet. The electromagnet then tigthens a latch that locks the lever down. If you let go of the lever before the latch settles, it may not lock and the lever will immediately pop back up.

The connector for the cartridge is mounted as high as it is because it made it easier to fit the wiering behind it, and because it makes it easier to remove or insert cartridges. Unfortunately I see that I should have mounted everything in the opposite direction, so that the buttons and controller ports would be in the front instead of the cartridge connector.

I don't got any pictures of the construction process, but I have made a brief scetch of the internals. The wires between the cirquit board and the cartridge connector are not shown either.