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View Full Version : OMG so I guess the world really is burnt out on Lisas!!!



tipc
August 26th, 2011, 12:26 PM
Look at the prices on ePay. Look at completed listings. And some idiot is trying to get 300$ for a box!

I still have mine in storage. Don't think I ever even plugged it in. First thing I'll likely do is scrape the battery acid and rust and retrobleach it. Whenever.

tezza
August 26th, 2011, 01:16 PM
Look at the prices on ePay. Look at completed listings. And some idiot is trying to get 300$ for a box!

I still have mine in storage. Don't think I ever even plugged it in. First thing I'll likely do is scrape the battery acid and rust and retrobleach it. Whenever.

Actually it's probably not that idiotic. If you look at vintage computer trading from a purely investment point of view (which incidently, I don't), adding a box to a good condition Lisa may well increase the value by more than $300. You would recoup your investment on the box and put the item up there in the collectable investments category.

Tez

GottaLottaStuff
August 26th, 2011, 01:21 PM
Hmmmm the local Goodwill has a Packard Bell monitor with it's original box for $20. Maybe I should buy it, toss the monitor, and eBay the box and foam for $50.

geoffm3
August 30th, 2011, 11:49 AM
Hmmmm the local Goodwill has a Packard Bell monitor with it's original box for $20. Maybe I should buy it, toss the monitor, and eBay the box and foam for $50.

lol... well, that's a bit of a different scenario. An Apple Lisa which is highly sought after and uncommon, and generally don't come with all the extra paraphernalia (box including) or a POS Packard Bell monitor... hmm..

DOS lives on!!
August 30th, 2011, 01:43 PM
I have all the original boxes for my Apple //c and my old Packard Bell machine. Wonder hou much they' go for? 3000 or 4000, according to that guy?:)

geoffm3
August 30th, 2011, 01:54 PM
I have all the original boxes for my Apple //c and my old Packard Bell machine. Wonder hou much they' go for? 3000 or 4000, according to that guy?:)

I agree that would be ridiculous. However I have seen a Coleco ADAM box sell for over $100 that was in mint condition. Some boxes like that one are very unusual and also full color, and due to the outrageous dimensions most have suffered a lot of damage or thrown away in the interim (I have one that is in bad condition, but I'm glad to have it nonetheless).

To me its the same thing as folks that will spend large sums of money to get a collectors car into concourse condition. Who gives a crap if it's got a new old stock OEM fan belt on it? Some folks do apparently. :)

tezza
August 30th, 2011, 03:00 PM
To me its the same thing as folks that will spend large sums of money to get a collectors car into concourse condition. Who gives a crap if it's got a new old stock OEM fan belt on it? Some folks do apparently. :)

Yea, and that's the whole point. Some hard-core collectors do care, which is why trying to sell a Lisa box is not that silly.

Tez

twolazy
August 31st, 2011, 06:30 PM
There's also another perspective...

Consider this. Think how rare a Nintendo NES or Sega mega system box is today. Most were thrown out. Given the numbers they sold, its rare you find one. I easily say 1 in 5000 people managed to save one. Now take the Lisa, its even more rare having been a flop. Given its sales numbers were low, using the same math, we would see the numbers show not many boxes would be about, minus New machines that remained unsold still in the box. So the fact a great condition box even exists, makes it all the more rarer, and worth the intrinsic value. Rarity comes at a price, and with it comes great bragging rights to all fellow nerds who share the same interests.

Maverick1978
September 1st, 2011, 06:59 AM
Tez and twolazy are spot-on. I've benefitted from those types of collectors from time to time for machines that I didn't care about (such as a LNIB Coleco Adam about 12 years ago, for instance).

Of course now I'm wishing I had held onto that Adam, as literally, some of the pieces had never been used. Then again, $165 12 years ago for that machine was a princely sum. And it went to a female proprietor of a computer repair shop in Arizona who kept a small living "museum" in her shop of classic 8-bit machines. Her first first computer was an Adam, and she planned on making it her centerpiece. Hopefully it's still enjoying that home.