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billdeg
September 5th, 2011, 12:01 PM
http://vintagecomputer.net/Gateway/thm_Gateway2000_P5-75.jpg

I just didn't have the heart to scrap this computer, the cables were all disconnected inside, but I was able to get it back up and running today. It's got Win 3.11 installed with a 16/4 ethernet card used to connect with an AS/400.

The P75 is pretty early Pentium, I assume that there were some earlier Pentiums by Gateway, but not too many. So then I did some searching and according to this link:
http://www.fortunecity.com/marina/reach/435/comphis8.html
...it was the first commercial computer marketed with a Pentium chip installed. Is that true or close to true, I thought there were P60's that were sold, but I don't really know.

So I guess I will hold on to it...For the record I consider this "post-vintage historical".

Bill

Unknown_K
September 5th, 2011, 12:16 PM
I have a P5-60 or 66 (forget which) and those were the first Pentiums (different socket type then later models). Very nice cases.

billdeg
September 5th, 2011, 12:20 PM
was the 60 sold in a PC before the 75? With the floating point bug? A search of the internet shows no "first pentium PC" claims. Anyone?

Unknown_K
September 5th, 2011, 12:29 PM
The original Pentium "p5" was the 60 and 66 (5v chips) and a few companies made machines out of them (IBM PS/2 90, Gateway P5 series, Packard Bell, and some others I forget). It was a Socket 4 chip (pretty large chip in fact), don't think is was around that long.

The "p54c" was next at 75, 90, 100 mhz at 3.3V

billdeg
September 5th, 2011, 12:31 PM
Bill how about you check yourself...Good idea, thanks me.

Yes. There was a Dell Dimension XPS P60 advertised in the January 1994 Byte.

Unknown_K
September 5th, 2011, 12:43 PM
All the big players had one or more models, not that many left in the wild I would think since they were not upgradable and most sellers just used a big heatsink and the case fan blowing over it (they tended to overheat).

billdeg
September 5th, 2011, 12:55 PM
The first production computers that used Pentium processors were servers, and they most cost more than $10,000.

July 1993 Byte is the first magazine that I could find to reference actual Pentium models, AND were marketed as PC's and not as servers:

Compaq Deskpro 5/66M $9399
Unisys PW $10,000

So for now I would consider one of these two to be "first" Pentium desktops (not servers).

Bill

Chuck(G)
September 5th, 2011, 01:00 PM
HP Vectras and in particular, the VLB P75 minitower used just that arrangement--a plastic duct connected to the case fan. It was an extremely quiet system and I ran a 150MHz P1 in it for quite some time. All of the Vectras using that duct+fan (went well into the PIII systems) were very quiet, owing to a HP-unique power supply setup that throttled down the PSU fan speed according to a thermistor on the motherboard.

I detest those little 40 mm heatsink fans. They're often noisy and prone to failure. Worse are the little 25 mm units sometimes used to cool northbridge chips.

Krille
September 5th, 2011, 01:19 PM
It's got Win 3.11 installed with a 16/4 ethernet card used to connect with an AS/400.

Sorry for nitpicking but wouldn't that be a token ring card? ;)

Unknown_K
September 5th, 2011, 01:31 PM
This article states the first Pentium CPUs were shipped in March, 22 1993: http://www.zdnet.com/blog/hardware/first-pentium-cpus-shipped-14-years-ago-yesterday/331

The PB I have is a Legend 300CD, no ship date
The Gateway P5 is a P5-66 4/30/94 man. date

billdeg
September 5th, 2011, 01:33 PM
Sorry for nitpicking but wouldn't that be a token ring card? ;)

Yes...it was used to connect to an AS/400. My bad.

billdeg
September 5th, 2011, 01:38 PM
This article states the first Pentium CPUs were shipped in March, 22 1993: http://www.zdnet.com/blog/hardware/first-pentium-cpus-shipped-14-years-ago-yesterday/331



... yes the chip itself was available for some months before the first servers started sporting them.

Anyway, my first Pentium was a Texas Micro P90 laptop. I was so excited to get it. That was September 1995. I got it with Windows 95 installed. I used it every day for about 5 years, until I replaced it with a Dell Inspiron 8000 laptop (which I still use with Win 2000 and Ubuntu dual boot) because it has a serial port good for terminal emulation.

This post has no rudder, sorry.

Bill

dan951
September 5th, 2011, 05:25 PM
That was back in the day when gateway built a great machine. The case on that computer is very roomy inside. The older gateway tower is one of my favorite cases. I have a gateway P4d-66 tower and g6-266 tower in my collection both are great machines and were purchased new by me.

DOS lives on!!
September 6th, 2011, 03:49 AM
I have a P5-100 and a 4DX2-66E. Both have a lot of space and are very robust.

joseph456
August 10th, 2013, 08:21 AM
Any idea what the Gateway 2000 P5-75 Tower is worth? Is it worth keeping? Includes a tape drive, 3.5 and 5.25 drives, CD Rom

billdeg
August 10th, 2013, 08:44 AM
I have been working on a list of the "historical" Pentium machines hold onto or value. The P5-75 is an early Pentium but not of the first generation, there is nothing particularly ground breaking or historical. As a general rule if the pentium production date is before 1995 it is more desirable. Look at the chips' dates of your machine. Regardless, the Gateway P5-75 is more desirable than a no-name Pentium, and at this time Gateway was at its heyday. These have some value, eventually I could see a few collectors concentrating on the mid 90's early Internet stuff.

Unless it's in very good condition, fully working, have original boxes, etc. it's worth about the price of shipping it. I can't see these outpacing the price of shipping for at least 10 years.

joseph456
August 10th, 2013, 12:25 PM
Actually it is in very good condition, fully working and I have original boxes, manuals and disks from Gateway. It has the original WD Caviar 2850 HD (853.6 MB) and a Hard Drive that I added - WD Caviar 24300 - 4311.9 MB.

I took out the HDs for security.

Does that change anything? How much more would it be worth. I was getting ready to turn it in to the local computer store for recycling when I saw various ads actually selling these.

billdeg
August 10th, 2013, 12:45 PM
what the heck, see if you can get $200 for it on Ebay. It's probably worth something to someone, esp. with the boxes. Even without a hard drive.

Caluser2000
August 10th, 2013, 12:59 PM
Just wipe the smaller hdd do a fresh install and the system can be advertised software install is as shipped from Dell. As Bill mentions there is an interest, especially from those who used one as a kid.

arrow_runner
August 10th, 2013, 01:17 PM
I'd put the hard drive back in. I mean really, even non-wiped what would possibly be on that drive that anyone would really care about? Do wipe it anyway, I'm just saying I've picked up many used systems and not one has had secret bank codes that are still valid 20 years later with millions of dollars in them. I am, however, keeping my fingers crossed.

Clint
August 10th, 2013, 11:12 PM
That brings back memories, I used to run the UK service department for these Gateways until they pulled back out of the market.

joseph456
August 11th, 2013, 12:40 PM
Thanks for the review.

I also have another Gateway Tower which I am deciding whether to sell or recycle. It is a Pro SP 4-1400 (Listed by Belarc Advisor as E-4600), 1.40 GHz Pentium 4 Processor, 8 kb primary memory, 250 GB secondary memory, 768 MB Ram, _NEC NR-7700A [CD-ROM drive], LG CD-ROM CRD-8483B R/W, 3.5" [Floppy drive], IOMEGA ZIP 250 [Hard drive]. Very good to Excellent Condition. Hard Drive has gone bad.

Saw SP4 - 1500 for sale on EBay for $315.10

Opinion?

Old Thrashbarg
August 11th, 2013, 07:15 PM
Saw SP4 - 1500 for sale on EBay for $315.10

Opinion?

My opinion is that whoever is trying to sell one of those things for $315 must be on some very, very powerful drugs. Nobody is going to buy it at that price. Nobody is going to buy it at half, or even a quarter of that price. They're too slow to be useful, but too new to be retro. They may get a bit more attention in a few years just due to the fact that they use RDRAM and the unusual (and short lived) Socket 423, but at this point, they're $20 machines, at best. The memory is worth saving, the Zip drive could be handy, and maybe the optical drives if you happen to need some. The rest of it... not so much.

WMH
August 12th, 2013, 02:56 PM
My opinion is that whoever is trying to sell one of those things for $315 must be on some very, very powerful drugs.

$315! I agree, who knows what they're on... I can see someone who needs it paying $20-$30 for the RAM, and maybe $5-$10 for the Zip drive. The rest of the machine probably isn't worth that much. To illustrate, about a year ago I picked up a Dell Dimension at a church garage sale with a 1.6 GHz Pentium 4, 1 CD drive, 512 MB RAM, a floppy drive and a broken HDD. I only payed $2.