PDA

View Full Version : Anybody using a Pentium prior to the 133?



Unknown_K
September 6th, 2011, 05:40 PM
From what I remember the Pentium took off (home use) around the time the P133 was released, before that systems were kind of pricey and people were still using high end cheap 486's. The older models (especially the 60/66) were not that common and judging by what I had seen at recyclers most pentium systems were 166 and 233MMX with a few Cyrix in the mix.

So how many people actually have the older models in their collection (machines not just CPU) and what do you use them for if anything?

krebizfan
September 6th, 2011, 05:52 PM
I have a Pentium-90 that I use occasionally. Big nearly indestructible Micron tower which stores lots of spare parts with PCI, EISA, SCSI for a good system to test old hardware. I used over the past few weeks for the identification and reading of floppy disks. It is unfortunate that I haven't been able to find a very cheap source of a second CPU because sometimes OS/2 SMP seems like something fun to try.

Ole Juul
September 6th, 2011, 06:10 PM
I don't have a "system" but one of my two main DOS boxes has a P60 gold top. I had originally used that MB and chip because I thought it would work w/o a CPU fan (my P133 does just fine), but it's a bit flaky without the tiny fan (no heat sink) that I added.

Unknown_K
September 6th, 2011, 06:13 PM
I don't have a "system" but one of my two main DOS boxes has a P60 gold top. I had originally used that MB and chip because I thought it would work w/o a CPU fan (my P133 does just fine), but it's a bit flaky without the tiny fan (no heat sink) that I added. I never seen a heatsink/fan combination on a P60/P66 they seem to use a glued on huge heatsink for cooling. I wonder if Pentium 1 heatsink/fans are going to get rare (have a few new ones in stock).

Ole Juul
September 6th, 2011, 06:19 PM
I never seen a heatsink/fan combination on a P60/P66 they seem to use a glued on huge heatsink for cooling. I wonder if Pentium 1 heatsink/fans are going to get rare (have a few new ones in stock).
Lots of nice gold tops which look great, were ruined by those glue-ons from what I've seen.

carlsson
September 6th, 2011, 10:38 PM
I recently installed Windows 98SE on my Pentium 75 with 16 MB memory. It was painful both to install and use. Actually that one is better off in MS-DOS land, and I should rather save Win98 for my stripped Pentium 200MMX.

Tor
September 6th, 2011, 11:42 PM
My personal mail handling computer is a Pentium 90. It replaced my 486 machine when that one's scsi board failed and took the motherboard with it. It runs and runs. Current uptime 441 days.
Disks are even older than the original 486 (1990 and 1991, the oldest scsi disk from 1989 finally gave up a while ago).

-Tor

Ole Juul
September 6th, 2011, 11:44 PM
I recently installed Windows 98SE on my Pentium 75 with 16 MB memory. It was painful both to install and use. Actually that one is better off in MS-DOS land, . . .
Indeed, I think it's the perfect machine for DOS.

I wonder how many were made. The OP is probably right though, the 133 is when things took off judging by how few 60 or 75mhz machines are around.

Tor
September 6th, 2011, 11:53 PM
We did have a Pentium 75 somewhere at work at one time. Maybe several. They've probably been dumped a long time ago. The Pentium 90 box I've stacked away in a corner to be my mail server is probably the only Pentium left in the building.

-Tor

Unknown_K
September 7th, 2011, 12:44 AM
90's are not that common either, people hated the 75's because they were slow (50x1.5 FSB).

carlsson
September 7th, 2011, 12:58 AM
You're probably correct about anything before 120 or 133 MHz were for early adopters. I remember when our student computer club bought our first Pentium in early 1996, we settled for a then maxed P133 even if it dug a hole in the cash register.

dan87951
September 7th, 2011, 03:12 AM
P133's were huge back in that day. There are still lots of chips out there as well. I have a 133 Dos gaming machine and a original Gateway P4D-66 that i use for games as well. More of a nostalgia type of thing than anything.. beyond DOS there kinda useless..

Eudimorphodon
September 7th, 2011, 08:17 AM
Perhaps it's an artifact of selective memory or something, but it seems to me that 90Mhz Pentiums were actually pretty common. At its introduction it was expensive and rare for home use but it stuck around as a "budget option" for quite a while after the 133-200Mhz models came out. (The last Pentium desktop I let into the house, around 2002 or so, had a P-90 in it.) What *is* rare is Pentium 75-100Mhz machines equipped with the CPU-introduction-vintage "Neptune" chipset. Those "budget era" P-90s I kept tripping over all had either 430FX/VX boards or horrid PCChips/OPTi knockoffs, demonstrating that they'd been equipped with an "obsolete" CPU from day one.

It is *specifically* 90Mhz machines I recall as common. I think the reason was that near the end of the sales life of the CPU vendors would price the 90Mhz chips at practically that same price as the 75Mhz ones while still asking a "significant" premium for the 100Mhz models. (It'd literally be something like $75 for the 75, $79 for 90, and $99 for the 100mhz. For the seriously bottom-of-the-barrel crowd that spread would make the 90Mhz the obvious choice. I was in that crowd when I bought my first Pentium-class machine, and as a result ended up with... the AMD K5-90. Same price structure as the Intel chips but yet another $15 or so cheaper. Whee.)

Unknown_K
September 7th, 2011, 11:39 AM
I jumped from a 486-133 AMD (OC to 160) to a Cyrix 686 166 for about a month but switched to a Pentium 133 because the cyrix just overheated too much (and the FPU sucked and Quake just came out). After a while I upgraded to a p233mmx and purchased a second board (BTW I built all of my computers after the 286) which had a cheap AMD K5-133 (still have that CPU on the shelf). That P233MMX was on a TX board I sold down the road, was smart enough to keep my M-tech HX Pentium boards which cached much more then 64MB.

Still have a few PCChip Pentium boards that came in AT cases I got from freecycle (wanted the cases). The big deal about VX/TX at the time was they could use a SDRAM DIMM, but that didnt help much down the road since they could not deal with higher density DIMMS and you generally only got one DIMM slot.

I had looked into early dual P1 motherboards but never found a real use for one other then novelty so I never purchased one, they might be too pricey now to bother.

Jorg
September 7th, 2011, 12:33 PM
I still have my old P90 on an Asus P54TP4 (430FX) board in storage.
One of the most solid systems I used.
I should try to find a case for it.

Eudimorphodon
September 7th, 2011, 02:48 PM
I jumped from a 486-133 AMD (OC to 160) to a Cyrix 686 166 for about a month but switched to a Pentium 133 because the cyrix just overheated too much (and the FPU sucked and Quake just came out).

Sometimes I think I'm the only person on earth that liked the Cyrix 686/166+. I had one and I thought it was a great CPU for running Linux on. Integer performance was *very good* and I never noticed a heat problem. Granted it was the improved "6x86L" with the IBM label, not the early infamously hot one.

(If you want to talk about overheating CPUs try the first-model K6-233. Smokin'!)

Unknown_K
September 7th, 2011, 03:05 PM
Never had the K6-233, all the K6 chips I had were K6-2's (got a 400 for a project in the late 1990's since it was speedy and cheap). The K5 I have kind of soured me on AMD and I spent the next few years buying new P2/P3 CPU's switching back to the Athlon XP when the 1500+ came around. Before that AMD 486/160 I had a ton of other 486 AMD chip along with a Cyrix 486/40 and before that an AMD 386/40.

My 686-166 Cyrix was the first version of that chip and it ran very hot. It was very good for most tasks, but like I said Quake came out and the FPU was king for gaming, which is what drove my upgrades back then. Kind of funny how I loved Cyrix 387 chips and even the Cyrix 486 CPUs had a decent FPU section but Intel (maybe by accident) realy guessed correctly and made the Pentium the FPU king at the correct point in history when it was needed.

I do like the K6-2+ found on some laptops (kind of like a K6-3) that extra cache and 550 mhz makes then nice to use.

DonutKing
September 7th, 2011, 03:44 PM
I have a socket 4 mainboard and a Pentium 60 but I don't really do anything with them, mainly just used for benchmarking/testing. I was disappointed to find that my Pentium 60 did not have the FDIV bug.

Back in the day I skipped the first Pentium generation as I went from a 486SX-25 to a Pentium II 266.... the difference was astounding :)
I did see plenty of Pentium systems around but they were pretty much all socket 7, 120MHz or higher.

Chuck(G)
September 7th, 2011, 04:02 PM
P90s used to be particularly common in laptops--I have a Dell Latitude with one. My HP Vectra VLB came with a P75.

Unknown_K
September 7th, 2011, 05:11 PM
P90s used to be particularly common in laptops--I have a Dell Latitude with one. My HP Vectra VLB came with a P75.

Yea, I have quite a few early model Pentium 1 laptops, but those chips are the mobile versions and seem to have come late in the Pentium timeline. When the early desktop pentiums were around laptops were probably still 486 or even 386.

dan87951
September 9th, 2011, 07:22 AM
I jumped from a 486-133 AMD (OC to 160) to a Cyrix 686 166 for about a month but switched to a Pentium 133 because the cyrix just overheated too much (and the FPU sucked and Quake just came out). After a while I upgraded to a p233mmx and purchased a second board (BTW I built all of my computers after the 286) which had a cheap AMD K5-133 (still have that CPU on the shelf). That P233MMX was on a TX board I sold down the road, was smart enough to keep my M-tech HX Pentium boards which cached much more then 64MB.

Still have a few PCChip Pentium boards that came in AT cases I got from freecycle (wanted the cases). The big deal about VX/TX at the time was they could use a SDRAM DIMM, but that didnt help much down the road since they could not deal with higher density DIMMS and you generally only got one DIMM slot.

I had looked into early dual P1 motherboards but never found a real use for one other then novelty so I never purchased one, they might be too pricey now to bother.

Wow that brings back memories. I do remember that a lot of my buddies at the time went the "cheaper" route and bought the 6x86 but my P133 with a Tyan board ripped their Cyrix's in terms of performance. Quake was an obvious choice in that and I believe Duke Nukem 3D came out not long after and made it even worse. However I still like the Cyrix chip version 2.7+ or I believe more commonly called the "L" version as it was much improved. I do have an original 6x86PR-166+ in my collection however my Asus P5A will not recognize it correctly since it’s not the later 2.7 version, it always comes up as a P90+ in this board. Either way I still wish Cyrix was still in the CPU game. Competition is always good..

Eudimorphodon
September 9th, 2011, 08:47 AM
Either way I still wish Cyrix was still in the CPU game. Competition is always good..

Cyrix is *sort* of still around in the form of VIA, but I'm not sure they count. The VIA Nano was getting a fair amount of press as an Atom competitor but other than a few Mini-ITX boards it seems to be unobtanium in the real world.

The C7 was a dud. I made the mistake of getting one of those oh-so-pretty HP 2133 aluminum laptops with it. A 600Mhz PIII runs rings around it.

billdeg
September 9th, 2011, 12:54 PM
per the earlier thread I had a Texas Micro P90 laptop and loved it. I bought it new in the fall of 1995.

I would like a Compaq Deskpro 5/66M if anyone has one for sale.

Bill

twolazy
September 9th, 2011, 01:13 PM
Still have my first Pentium, a Dell xps 90 I purchased new, as well as a p66 Toshiba laptop. Don't use them all that much anymore, too fast for most dos games , and too slow for most windows games. :(

The p90 only gets used for Command and Conquer Tiberian Sun and Axis and Allies now.


Either way I still wish Cyrix was still in the CPU game. Competition is always good..

Actually they somewhat still are, under the name of TI. Funny part is Cyrix started out with mostly TI employees, since it was founded by one itself! Most of the lead techs/engineers stayed after the merger to National Semi. Ironic part is next VIA buys National, and now TI buys VIA!!!!! Its gone full circle! Anyways , back to Cyrix...

Sadly Cyrix bet too much on the Cyrix Genode CPU's and M2's, and ended up loosing the farm when they could not meet manufacturing goals ( Mostly due to National Semi I might add, not their own incompetence!). I was actually a huge fan of cryix. The FPU may have been weak, but in most desktop publishing / office / web-surfing was way faster then the equivalent speed intel/amd. And even more impressive were the java cpu instructions in the GX2/M2. Kind of like MMX, but instead of multimedia enhancements only, it also increased java speed. Intel tried copying their structure somewhat with Netburst, and nearly lost the cpu war themselves with early p4's. Sadly Cyrix was just too far ahead of their time towards the end, with no eye on current demands other then office apps. If they had tweaked the FPU to match AMD, mostly likely it be AMD that was dead today. It was mostly this oversight as well as the merger with National that sealed their fate. Never mind the fact you could not use an AWE64 on any Cyrix 6x86 or Genode. It would only use 32 voices instead of 64, making your nice awe64 a cheap awe32. LOL! Most people never knew of this bug. Top that off with the 75/83mhz fsb fiasco... Shame what happened to Cyrix. =(

njroadfan
September 9th, 2011, 01:55 PM
Never mind the fact you could not use an AWE64 on any Cyrix 6x86 or Genode. It would only use 32 voices instead of 64, making your nice awe64 a cheap awe32. LOL! Most people never knew of this bug. Top that off with the 75/83mhz fsb fiasco... Shame what happened to Cyrix. =(

The same applied to AMD chips too. Creative's installer for the WaveGuide software wavetable synth insisted on a real Intel Pentium in the system.

While on the subject, anyone remember NexGen? They dared to be different and had their own socket, never came across one of those machines after all these years though. They gotta be pretty rare.

krebizfan
September 9th, 2011, 04:55 PM
The same applied to AMD chips too. Creative's installer for the WaveGuide software wavetable synth insisted on a real Intel Pentium in the system.

While on the subject, anyone remember NexGen? They dared to be different and had their own socket, never came across one of those machines after all these years though. They gotta be pretty rare.

I saw one Nexgen equipped system back around 96 but its lack of a coprocessor kept me from bothering with it. I think the improved coprocessor equipped version would be incredibly rare since AMD bought NexGen about the same time and quickly closed down NexGen's product lines.

Unknown_K
September 9th, 2011, 05:46 PM
I would love to get a NexGen but they were rare back then let alone now.

dan87951
September 11th, 2011, 07:30 PM
Just found the receipt for our P133 upgrade (fastest chip out at the time) from back in the day 96-97 time frame (can't read date). Price was $579. Can't remember if that was with the motherboard or not its very hard to read.

Ole Juul
September 11th, 2011, 08:18 PM
I just realized that I also have a Compaq Prolinea P75 which I use simply to contain an old HDD which I might want to refer back to on occasion. I'm keeping it as a collector's item, but I absolutely hate it. Not being able to modify the BIOS without some special disk makes it proprietary garbage to my way of thinking. My P60 on an unidentified MB with an American Megatrends BIOS is a way better machine and actually gets some use.

MaTel
September 13th, 2011, 12:25 AM
I have a Compaq Deskpro 466 with a Pentium Overdrive 83 MHz (PODP5V83) on it. Sometimes I use it for some old DOS-Applications. Installed is DOS 6.22 and Windows for Workgroups 3.11.

bettablue
October 19th, 2011, 07:06 AM
I recently installed Windows 98SE on my Pentium 75 with 16 MB memory. It was painful both to install and use. Actually that one is better off in MS-DOS land, and I should rather save Win98 for my stripped Pentium 200MMX.

I actually had an old P75 that came with a Windows 95 machine. It originally had only 4 Megs of RAM. After upgrading to 16 Megs, and installed Windows 98, it ran fine. Then again, I unstalled a clean version of 98 and got rid of all of the junk that came installed originally. In fact, it was in use from 1995 till about 2001 when I finally had to give up and upgrade to another computer.

Raven
October 19th, 2011, 07:20 AM
I have several, some Socket 4 and 5 boxes. A Socket 5 75Mhz gold-top was my main DOS box for a while, and I went to upgrade the CPU and was surprised to find it was a Socket 5 and not 7 as I had expected to see. I maxed out the socket (at least as far as what I had) with a 100Mhz chip. I mostly had been using the P75 for stuff that most people would relegate to a 486 - Win3x, DOS games from the early 90s, etc.. but I also did some later DOS games like Quake on there. The P75 and then the P100 had the added advantage of being BLAZING FAST under Win3x. It might have been software configuration, but IIRC the P75 was even faster than my Am5x86 133Mhz under Win3x.

My Socket 5 box also has odd ISA slots - they are white and are slightly wider, so you can insert cards with much less force. They instead rely on the screw to keep the card in place snugly. It's really nice, lol.

JohnElliott
October 19th, 2011, 02:05 PM
My first PC was an Escom P75 I bought in 1996, when that was low-end. I think it's still in the loft somewhere.

BGoins12
October 23rd, 2011, 06:10 AM
I don't have it anymore... but we used to have an Acer Acros with a 75MHz Pentium... 16MB ram. It was running Windows 3.1 when we got it, but I upgraded it to 95. I soon learned that a P75 was too slow in 1999, and we got a far better one... I think it was a eMachines eTower 333i. Had a 333MHz Celeron, 128MB ram, 10GB HD. I thought it was a HUGE step into the future when we got it.

Compgeke
October 23rd, 2011, 12:03 PM
Back in 2009 I had a Gateway 2000 P5-100 running Windows 95 and *gasp* 64 megabytes of ram! This had a 100 MHz Pentium III, 1 gigabyte hard drive, 2x CD-ROM, S3 Trio 64V+ and no sound card :(. I then had an eMachines eTower 600ix for about 3 weeks until I got my AMD Athlon XP 1800+ system which lasted me a year until the power supply blew and took the motherboard and processor with it (along with the hard drive and video card). After that for the next year I went through 2 computers, a Pentium 4 HT @ 3.2 GHz, a huge step up which died of a motherboard failure then an AMD Athlon X2 4600 that still runs but I upgraded to my current computer which is a 2.66 GHz Core 2 Duo.

ed1475
October 23rd, 2011, 04:06 PM
I've got a P75 Packard Bell Legend computer that I got new in 1995. It came with MS-DOS 6.2 and Windows 3.11 for Work Groups and a coupon for a free upgrade to Windows 95 when it was released.

It still has the original P75 processor but I've upgraded almost everything else. 8 mb ram upgraded to 40 mb. 1 mb video ram upgraded to 2 mb.
850 mb hard disk drive upgraded to 1.2 gb. I also added a 360k 5.25" disk drive as the B: drive.

I still use it ocassionally for DOS gaming and other DOS software.

Neon_WA
November 8th, 2011, 11:18 PM
I could never afford a Pentium when they came out.. started with a Cyrix 133+
But have collected numerous systems over the past few years & I especially like multiple CPU systems

At present in Socket 4/5 I have numerous white box systems but also these
IBM PC Server 300 (single P60 but it has had a P90 on a adaptor & a PODP5V120) running NT3.51 WS
2 x IBM PC Server 320 (dual P75s & other dual P90s) running NT4.0 WS
Compaq Proliant 2500 (quad P100s but I have the P133 & P166 cards) running NT 4.0 Server
Compaq Proliant 2000 (quad P66s also have the P90 cards but still chasing 2 more 486 cards) running NT 3.51 Server

Tor
November 9th, 2011, 12:58 PM
Argh, the setup I described in an earlier post finally gave up life.. what happened was that a 2GB IDE disk broke, while the much older SCSI disks kept running just fine, no problems (3 of them, from 1990 - the fourth, from 1989, gave up a year ago). I thought I had good backups, but they were a bit old as it turned out. The IDE disk could be fully read in an offline USB IceBox setup though, even though it didn't work in the PC. A terrible noise from it. Didn't have another 2GB or small IDE disk, and it refused to run with a new big IDE. Some wee bit of trouble finding a PC with the right combination of slots to use both the Adaptec ISA SCSI controller and the rest, but got it all sorted out eventually, SCSI content and all (although those disks are still running, spinning as they have done for 21 years, even though there's no PC connected anymore).

So now it's all running in a virtual system instead.

-Tor

animekenji
November 27th, 2011, 11:52 AM
I saw one Nexgen equipped system back around 96 but its lack of a coprocessor kept me from bothering with it. I think the improved coprocessor equipped version would be incredibly rare since AMD bought NexGen about the same time and quickly closed down NexGen's product lines.

lzf70000 is selling one on ebay for $850! I have two motherboards with 90mhz chips on them but they are both VL-Bus. I don't understand why Nexgen bothered making VL-Bus motherboards at all. VL-Bus is a 486 technology, not a Pentium technology. They should have been making only PCI boards for the nx586. It sucks trying to build a Nexgen system now because of both the chips with the FPU's and the PCI motherboards being so hard to find. You can't run any of the good Pentium era games on a machine with no FPU and only VL-Bus/ISA for video.

k2x4b524[
December 25th, 2011, 08:08 PM
Tor, that is a rather sad, yet invigorating tale, my first pentium machine was a p-166mmx box, i thought, and still do think, it is the best thing since sliced bread for dos gaming. 64mb Ram, dual 850mb hdds, win 95, still whirrs along faithfully. I've recently gotten alot of my life and parts sorted out and am able to be part of the forums again. And tor, do you have any used shops that you could get a 2gb hdd from? If not, PM me.

Trixter
December 25th, 2011, 09:34 PM
So how many people actually have the older models in their collection (machines not just CPU) and what do you use them for if anything?

I still have my Pentium 120 that I drag out from time to time. It cost me $2500 in 1995, and I wrote about it (also in 1995) here: ftp://ftp.scene.org/mirrors/hornet/info/demonews/1995/demonews.094 (scroll down to the text "Behemoth - 120Mhz Pentium for Demos".

What I don't think I touch on in the article is that, to accommodate a 120MHz CPU, the bus speed was 60MHz instead of a more normal 66MHz. This didn't seem like a big deal at the time but it actually wreaked havoc with my very first 3-D accelerated card, an ATI 3-D Expression+PC2TV (had TV output, even for DOS programs and graphics). The timing mismatch caused the 3-D accelerator to operate so slowly that CPU rendering in software was actually faster.

bettablue
December 26th, 2011, 09:36 AM
Now that I have found a need for one, I rebuilt an old Compaq 5304 from about 1998 or 99. It has a P1 333 processor with 64 Megs of RAM and a whopping 4 Gig hard drive. I have Windows 98SE/Plus installed as the primary OS, but I primarily use the underlying version of DOS 7.0. The only thing I use it for is writing floppy disks to use with my even older IBM 5150. Some of the things that were changed were to replace the original CD ROM with a new 24X DVD ROM, remove the 3.5" floppy and install an internal 100 Meg zip drive and finally, added in a 5.25" 360Kb floppy drive. There are some issues with the 360 K floppy tha I am addressing an another thread, but outside of that, this is a pretty useable computer. I had forgotten how useful these old systems could be. I am even thinking about installing a newer, larger drive. Something on the order of about 100 Gig. Of course that means I'll have to partition the hell out of it, but at least I'll have the storage space I need and I can multi boot like crazy; DOS, Win 95, Win 98 Etc. This has the makings to be a decent vintage gaming machine. Doom, Quake, I've missed you.

dave_m
December 26th, 2011, 11:34 AM
P90s used to be particularly common in laptops--I have a Dell Latitude with one. My HP Vectra VLB came with a P75.

Is this because the P90 was a 3.3V chip and ran at less power than previous +5V Pentiums? Or did 3.3 V chips come earlier?

rheeluke123
December 26th, 2011, 12:04 PM
No, I'm just using
Pentium II
Main article: List of Intel Pentium II microprocessors
Core Process Frequency L2 Cache FSB Socket Release date
Klamath 0.35 m 233300 MHz 512 KB 66 MHz Slot 1 May 1997
Deschutes 0.25 m 266450 MHz 512 KB 66100 MHz Slot 1 January 1998
Tonga 0.25 m 233300 MHz 512 KB 66 MHz MMC-2 April 1998
Dixon 0.25 m 266366 MHz 256 KB 66 MHz MMC-2

SiliconClassics
December 26th, 2011, 07:01 PM
I seem to recall Pentiums becoming popular around the 90MHz mark. I think sales of the earlier chips were held back by worries about the floating point bug and they weren't worlds faster than 486-66MHz chips anyway.

Personally I've got an old 75Mhz ThinkPad 755CD that I bought through Craigslist about eight years ago, and my family's second computer was a 133MHz Pentium with 32MB RAM purchased new in July 1995. It was a full-tower Micron Millennia and I've still got the receipt: $4,117.00 for the computer sans video and another $449.00 for an ATI Graphics Pro Turbo 4MB PCI video card from a third-party vendor. Add an extra $1059 for a 17" Sony Trinitron display and the total was $5,625.

The 75MHz chip is nothing to write home about, and I would not consider it adequate to run Windows 95 satisfactorily. But the 133MHz Pentium really shined - it was great for playing The Need for Speed and Flight Unlimited, which had just come out around that time.

pearce_jj
December 28th, 2011, 02:50 AM
Is this because the P90 was a 3.3V chip and ran at less power than previous +5V Pentiums? Or did 3.3 V chips come earlier?

Only P60/P66 were 5V (and the illusive 50MHz engineering samples). P75+ were 3.3V.

P75 wasn't so popular maybe because of the 25MHz bus speed, so I guess a 486/DX4 was probably as fast and a lot cheaper at the time. P90/P120/P150 ran 60MHz bus speed, and P100/P133/P166/P200 the 'proper' 66MHz.

Neon_WA
December 28th, 2011, 05:12 PM
P75 wasn't so popular maybe because of the 25MHz bus speed

They ran on a 50MHz bus speed

also P100s ran on 66 or 50MHz

bettablue
December 28th, 2011, 07:25 PM
My first Pentium was a 75 Mhz Packard Bell. It really wasn't as bad as some made it out to be. But when these were first sold, they came with only had 4 Megs of RAM installed along with a 540 Meg hard drive. After upgrading to 16 Megs of RAM and a 2 Gig drive, it ran like a whole new machine. My wife and I used it until about 2001 or 2002 when we actually sold it for use as a server.

The computer had some drawbacks, but then again it was the first one that I knew of that sold with a pentium of any kind. I bought mine for almost $800.00 with a computer monitor and mechanical keyboard and it had the famous monitor mounted speakers. Nice design, but really a pain to upgrade. I sometimes wish I still had that computer.



They ran on a 50MHz bus speed also P100s ran on 66 or 50MHz

Tor
December 29th, 2011, 03:06 AM
Tor, that is a rather sad, yet invigorating tale, my first pentium machine was a p-166mmx box, i thought, and still do think, it is the best thing since sliced bread for dos gaming. 64mb Ram, dual 850mb hdds, win 95, still whirrs along faithfully. I've recently gotten alot of my life and parts sorted out and am able to be part of the forums again. And tor, do you have any used shops that you could get a 2gb hdd from? If not, PM me.
k2xb4524,
Thanks for the offer, it's much appreciated, but I don't think I will resurrect this machine. First, there seems to have been some collateral damage on the motherboard, and secondly, I didn't really keep the system running because it was near-vintage - it was simply because I had that system set up for a specific purpose (mail server, cvs server, other things) years ago and I just kept it running because it was a tricky setup to port to a newer system (a _very_ intricate sendmail setup, which would not work on a newer version and so on). So now that my virtual machine version of the system works (at least for the important parts) I'm happy.

-Tor

BillT356
December 31st, 2011, 05:09 PM
I have a Compaq Deskpro XL560, 60Mhz Pentium running NT4.0 server on a 535 MB SCSI HD. I don't use it, just collects dust right now. It came from a High School.

Todd82TA
January 4th, 2012, 03:50 PM
From what I remember the Pentium took off (home use) around the time the P133 was released, before that systems were kind of pricey and people were still using high end cheap 486's. The older models (especially the 60/66) were not that common and judging by what I had seen at recyclers most pentium systems were 166 and 233MMX with a few Cyrix in the mix.

So how many people actually have the older models in their collection (machines not just CPU) and what do you use them for if anything?


I had a gigantic (hugest tower case I've ever seen) Acer Altos 9000 Server. It had a Dual Pentium 60 processors with fans and heat sinks (the small tiny ones). It was gigantic. I acutally just found a picture of it online (although looks rather gutted in this picture)

7506

In any case, I've long since gotten rid of it. I'd have loved to keep it, but it was so huge that it really didn't make sense for me to keep it.

The thing had 8 removable hot-swappable full height 3.5" drive bays. It had a built in Ultra-Wide SCSI controller, a normal SCSI-2 controller, two IDE ports (4 IDE devices), a floppy controller, 6 or 8 ram slots (I think), three external 5.25" drive bays, and a single 3.5" drive bay.

The thing had four legs that would swing out at the bottom to help support it. It also had wheels in the back, and a handle in the front on the top that you would pull out and you could wheel it around like a huge 50 pound suit case. The thing weighed a ridiculous amount... probably around 50 pounds. It really sucked on the rare occasions that I had to move the computer somewhere (like to go play Network Doom or something).

The picture above doesn't show it, but the computer also had two doors that covered the drive bays top and bottom.

Strangely enough, I actually have another Acer Altos server... no idea what model it is, but it's basically a slightly newer version of that computer above, and without all of the hot swappable drive bays. It's like half the height, and while it does have the legs that swing out, it doesn't have wheels or a handle.. hah... I guess it's somewhere in between a full tower and a mid tower.

Unknown_K
January 4th, 2012, 07:58 PM
That system reminds me of my Zenith Data Systems Z Server EX tower. A picture of what it looks like is here:
http://altern8.envy.nu/alt8/x86/zenith/index.html

The bottom has 8 HD bays, the CPU and RAM have their own pull out boards, and the case is probably the biggest I have in my collection. A very nice full EISA Pentium 90 system. There is a door that hides the floppy and CDROM in front. I think they also came in 486 versions.

Todd82TA
January 5th, 2012, 03:37 AM
That system reminds me of my Zenith Data Systems Z Server EX tower. A picture of what it looks like is here:
http://altern8.envy.nu/alt8/x86/zenith/index.html

The bottom has 8 HD bays, the CPU and RAM have their own pull out boards, and the case is probably the biggest I have in my collection. A very nice full EISA Pentium 90 system. There is a door that hides the floppy and CDROM in front. I think they also came in 486 versions.


Yeah, Zenith always had really quality stuff in there. You can tell that, even though it's old, it was built really well.

Compgeke
January 5th, 2012, 12:09 PM
That Acer tower looks awesome, think I need to find one so I have a case that is measurable to an Antec Plus 1080AMG ATX case, a huge and heavy server case, 35 pounds empty but it's the best case I've found so far, not using it now though because I have a Dell XPS 410 that was given to me.

Todd82TA
January 5th, 2012, 12:15 PM
That Acer tower looks awesome, think I need to find one so I have a case that is measurable to an Antec Plus 1080AMG ATX case, a huge and heavy server case, 35 pounds empty but it's the best case I've found so far, not using it now though because I have a Dell XPS 410 that was given to me.


Yeah... it was pretty cool. I remember now what I did with it. There was a computer store chain located in Florida called "Computer Renaissance." Don't know if they still exist. Anyway, I brought it in there and asked them if they wanted it. One of the dudes in the back came running out and was all excited. At least it went to a good home! hah...

animekenji
July 11th, 2012, 07:09 AM
The Pentium 166, and later the 166 MMX, were the quintessential Pentiums. During their time, they were everywhere. I don't think anybody here didn't have one or didn't know someone who had one back then. The Pentium 150 was the same chip running on a 60mhz bus. I went from a 486 DX2-80 to a Pentium 150 and then overclocked that Pentium 150 to 200mhz when it started getting slow. That's a pretty big overclock and I wouldn't have attempted it if I hadn't read somewhere that they were the same chip. I probably could have overclocked it a little more as some people were getting even higher overclocks with 166 chips back then but I didn't want to press my luck. I don't think I knew anyone who was using a Pentium slower than maybe 133mhz. They were all still using fast 486's during the early Pentium days and didn't upgrade until the 133 released.

Chuck(G)
July 11th, 2012, 08:06 AM
What people seem to be missing is the issue of price differential in desktops. The big-name manufacturers (HP, Compaq, IBM) all had products out that used P1s slower than 166MHz. I mentioned my HP Vectra using a P75 and I had a Tyan Tomcat board installed in a system with two P120s.

But a 486 for bog-standard Joe Consumer products still had a better bang-for-buck. It's the old story of "what do you want to pay for that extra power?" Do you want to pay for a Sandy Bridge Xeon EP board, or will a Pentium do?

P1 chips were quite a bit more expensive than the competition for quite some time. Quite a few of my P1-era motherboards were equipped with Cyrix or IBM 6x86 CPUs rather than Pentiums. I still have a K6 system on my workbench.

Unknown_K
July 11th, 2012, 09:56 AM
I think the K5 was competing with the Pentium 1's and did very badly. The original Cyrix 686 actually sold very well (except to gamers because of quake using the FPU) and probably caused Intel to actually be competitive with their CPU pricing for the first time. I don't think any larger brands used anything but Intel chips until the 686 came around.

bettablue
July 11th, 2012, 01:53 PM
The original Cyrix 686 actually sold very well (except to gamers because of quake using the FPU) and probably caused Intel to actually be competitive with their CPU pricing for the first time.

As a matter of vintage gaming I was running the full version of the original Quake, Doom, and Duke Nukem all on a P75 Packard Bell Legend. At first the computer balked at everything, but after eliminating all of Packard Bells bloatware, installing only Windows 95, and the software and games I waned, and upgrading the system from 4 Megs RAM to it's fullest which I think was either 16 or 32 Megs, these games ran fine.

My wife actually had a 486 computer which she purchased through one of those rent to own places. Oh yeah, she got ripped off BADLY! But, hers came with the same 4 Megs RAM, and a measely 100 Meg hard drive. Somehow she managed to install Windows 95 from floppy disk, then install Word Perfect. There was no room for anything else, but once we upgraded her computer to 32 Megs RAM and a 2 Gig hard disk, that computer blew mine away! The performance of the games was totally different. The 486 was a serious improvement over the Pentium.

These were the very first computers I actually openned up and did any work on. And it was because of what I learned by working on those computers at the time, I landed a nice position with a tech support company called MicroAge. Their main client was UPS. I won't go into the whole story here. Getting back on track, the 486 machines seemed to be much more stable than any of the Pentiums systems running up to 233 MHz processors. If I could, I would love to rebuild a decent 386 or 486 machine for vintage gaming. Something with at least a 66 MHz processor and up to 64 Megs of RAM would be nice.

Unknown_K
July 11th, 2012, 04:21 PM
Running "fine" means different things to different people. Quake ran better for me on a Cyrix 166 686 then it did on my earlier 486/160 but if you look at the link below:

http://www.soldcentralfl.com/quakecoop/compare1.htm

You realy needed a decent Pentium and/or a 3D card to get the most of the game unless you were into low framerates.

I never had much of a problem back in the day or even now with stability issues on any Pentium based machine (maybe I just use good ram and picked a decent chipset).

Caluser2000
July 13th, 2012, 03:00 PM
A Getting back on track, the 486 machines seemed to be much more stable than any of the Pentiums systems running up to 233 MHz processors. I've got a number of each class and stability wise running the same software there's absolutely no difference if the hardware is up to scratch.

dan951
July 15th, 2012, 02:55 PM
I got a few HP Vectra P90's that we still use for Doom/Duke/Battle Drome battles. I usually have a few friends over head into the man cave listen to music, drink a few brews and play these games against each other and remember the good ol days..

animekenji
July 17th, 2012, 01:12 PM
I had a gigantic (hugest tower case I've ever seen) Acer Altos 9000 Server. It had a Dual Pentium 60 processors with fans and heat sinks (the small tiny ones). It was gigantic. I acutally just found a picture of it online (although looks rather gutted in this picture)

7506



I think a Gateway 9000/ALR Revolution 6x6 beats it

http://i64.photobucket.com/albums/h168/German_Muscle/Picture023.jpg

Unknown_K
July 17th, 2012, 02:16 PM
I think a Gateway 9000/ALR Revolution 6x6 beats it

http://i64.photobucket.com/albums/h168/German_Muscle/Picture023.jpg

Would be nice to find one of those locally, very impressive.

huubwen
July 23rd, 2012, 11:44 AM
I have a Intel Pentium 60 on a BP5D60AT motherboard.
I use it mainly to deliberately raise the FDIV and F00F bug :)

animekenji
July 23rd, 2012, 12:51 PM
Would be nice to find one of those locally, very impressive.

Yes, it would be nice as the cases are apparently rare now. Most people who have one these days have built it piecemeal from parts and ended up using a hacked up ATX full tower case to mount it in, which is still an extremely tight fit. Just rounding up all the parts you need for a complete unit is a challenge in itself.

Unknown_K
July 23rd, 2012, 01:59 PM
Yes, it would be nice as the cases are apparently rare now. Most people who have one these days have built it piecemeal from parts and ended up using a hacked up ATX full tower case to mount it in, which is still an extremely tight fit. Just rounding up all the parts you need for a complete unit is a challenge in itself.

Yea, I seen the parts for sale for many years, just never a complete unit. Looks heavy and expensive to ship, something only a dedicated collector would bother with.

patscc
August 26th, 2012, 05:28 AM
My memory's drawing a blank here. Does anyone remember if any company managed to stuff a P60 into a laptop ? (Proper laptop, not lunchbox)
patscc

billdeg
August 26th, 2012, 11:22 AM
Yes, I had a Midwest Micro P60 laptop, purchased in Summer 1995. I remember deciding if I wanted Win 3.11 or Win 95. Went with 95.
Bill