PDA

View Full Version : Upgrade my PC or buy new?



USSEnterprise
April 1st, 2006, 11:05 PM
I've been debating what to do about this. I watched my computer go from being the most powerful in the house to the least. I need advice as to whether I should bother upgrading my current machine or just buy a whole new system. Here are it's specs:
1.6GHz P4 400MHz FSB Northwood
384MB PC133 RAM
120GB IDE Hard drive
nVidia Geforce FX 5500 128MB AGP
16x CD-R/W Drive
4x DVD-R/W Drive
USB 1.0

Now, here's what I could upgrade to without replacing the system board.
2.8GHz P4 at 400MHz FSB
1.5GB PC-133 RAM
Hard drive is fine
nVidia Geforce 6600 AGP
USB 2.0 on card

If I were to buy a new machine (build myself, of course), I would have the option of upgrading to HT and EM64T (If I choose Intel), PCI Express Video, DDR RAM, and SATA hard drive. I figured that I could get parts for a pretty good system for around $750. Upgrading my current machine would run me $300. Worth it?

NathanAllan
April 1st, 2006, 11:41 PM
If it were me, I wouldn't mess with it until I wanted to go for a 3 or 4 ghz processor. A cople of things I'd consider is upgrading the ram, the USB and MAYBE the graphics card. When I think of graphics, I think of how much load I can take off the processor, not gaming quality type things. If you needed a scanner today you'd have to have usb 2 just to be able to use it. Or any usb device. They're all being made for usb2. iirc.

alexkerhead
April 2nd, 2006, 12:11 AM
Enterprise, ALWAYS, I repeat, ALWAYS upgrade board first!
A new board and ddr ram, socket 478 would get you by on that video card just fine. Just get a 3.2GHz socket 478 chip later on. A new board will support both.

USSEnterprise
April 2nd, 2006, 08:26 AM
Enterprise, ALWAYS, I repeat, ALWAYS upgrade board first!
A new board and ddr ram, socket 478 would get you by on that video card just fine. Just get a 3.2GHz socket 478 chip later on. A new board will support both.
I thought that socket 775 is what everything is using now for Intel

Vlad
April 2nd, 2006, 08:38 AM
It is. Socket 478 is no longer in active production. It's been replaced by the 775 and 9-- sockets.

carlsson
April 2nd, 2006, 10:21 AM
A bit unrelated, but today I stopped by a flea market. I picked up a Slot-1 Pentium III 600EB (FSB 133, multiplier 4.5, 1.65V) and an AGP Matrox 906-04 with dual VGA, for 50 SEK ($6). Unfortunately, the computer(s) I had planned to use the CPU in are too old to support it, and I really don't have needs for an AGP graphics card - maybe more a PCI card in that case.

Oh well. Maybe I'll stumble across a motherboard new enough to take the CPU but old enough to still be Slot-1. The AGP card can come to use elsewhere or in a trade. I don't even know if they work... :roll:

alexkerhead
April 2nd, 2006, 06:47 PM
I thought that socket 775 is what everything is using now for Intel
My socket 478 system can keep up with most socket 775, 939 stuff.
BUt costs a lot less.

Vlad
April 2nd, 2006, 06:50 PM
I don't doubt that. 478 was a nice platform. It had it's share of heat issues, but they can be easily fixed. 775 and 939 were more or less for the garbage they make now. "Dual core" What ever.

(I'm not really an Intel fan. Can you tell?)

-V

USSEnterprise
April 2nd, 2006, 07:49 PM
I'm suprised then that you would insult socket 939 (AMD)

Vlad
April 2nd, 2006, 07:54 PM
I meant the 9-- socket that Intel used. No disrespect towards AMD. Just a little confused. What ever happened to Slot 1? That was my favorite.....

-V

alexkerhead
April 2nd, 2006, 09:04 PM
Slot 1 wouldn't be a good idea, seeing the size of the cooling systems these days..lol

USSEnterprise
April 2nd, 2006, 09:25 PM
Intel never made a socket 9xx.

carlsson
April 3rd, 2006, 12:52 AM
Remember that AMD had a Slot A for a while too, before they switched to Socket A. The CPU w/cooler is easy replaceable in a slot system, but maybe electronical and manufacture overhead made this type of CPUs obsolete and they went back to sockets again. Also, for a while the board took much less height when they went back to sockets, but with the increased monster fans, a modern socket based motherboard is about as high as an old slot based one.

alexkerhead
April 3rd, 2006, 04:25 PM
Intel never made a socket 9xx.
I know that, I was comparing my system to athlon 64s...lol
They have 775.

Vlad
April 3rd, 2006, 04:46 PM
I was thinking Processor number 940, which is a Pentium D. I crossed Processor number with Socket. http://www.intel.com/products/processor/pentium_D/index.htm

Huh? 775 is Intel.

-V

I was confused. (Apparently)

alexkerhead
April 3rd, 2006, 07:53 PM
Yes, it is their famed socket T. Amd has socket 939(home athlons and FX) and socket 940(professional opterons and some FXs) for their newest stuff.

Vlad
April 3rd, 2006, 08:00 PM
The 64-bit system I had was 754. But Chaintech doesn't know how to manufacture their stuff correctly, so it no longer works. I'm surrently looking for a replacement.......

dpatten
April 6th, 2006, 09:58 AM
Remember that AMD had a Slot A for a while too, before they switched to Socket A. The CPU w/cooler is easy replaceable in a slot system, but maybe electronical and manufacture overhead made this type of CPUs obsolete and they went back to sockets again. Also, for a while the board took much less height when they went back to sockets, but with the increased monster fans, a modern socket based motherboard is about as high as an old slot based one.


Intel went to the slot format to keep AMD from "socket stealing". The agreement between AMD and Intel didn't cover socket 7. So Intel immediately changed form factors to keep AMD from being able to use their new cpu interface for free. AMD was making out by essentially using Intel's R&D dollars when they made an Intel socket compatible CPU. IIRC the AMD slot A is PHYSICALLY the same but ELECTRICALLY different from Intel's slot 1.

Things were simpler back in the day, when you could compare apples to apples the difference between an Intel and AMD processor by using the same motherboard, Ram and vidcard.

carlsson
April 6th, 2006, 10:53 AM
I see. I think I've heard about the Socket 7 issues before. At a later point though, Intel seems to have licensed their Socket 370 interface to VIA/Cyrix and maybe a couple more CPU manufacturers. On the other hand, by the time those other CPUs were introduced, the high-end had moved on to Pentium 4 on Socket 423 (?) and later 478.