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CP/M User
April 10th, 2006, 03:23 AM
I'd thought I'd start up a general thread which describes who we are when we're are work or study.

Please respond cause I thought this would make a good collective thread & perhaps it could be built on in time.

For myself, I clearly have a good understanding of using computers, though I also have an interest in ecology & have found a great connection by incorporating technology with the outdoors - by collecting information & presenting it. All of this work has been whist studying - I figure it would be great to use/develop this though into the workplace.

Workwise - I've been mostly in short term jobs, which are great fun, though some development needs to occur in order really turn jobs on durning certain times of the year - seasons have a big impact on the work involved. But yeah, not bad working out in the bush - quite fascinating what you'd occur.

Otherwise since I'm quite interested in this field, it takes a little bit of time from me & is one of those fields where people are learning new stuff all the time. The funniest impression I have from this line of work is the short work space & how to make this more of a full-time ongoing type job. My biggest concern is finding work locally - truely I most interested actually make work from this.

So what do you lot do - doesn't matter what the job is & is okay to talk about what the job mean's to you, if you like it or not.

Bill_Loguidice
April 10th, 2006, 08:05 AM
I presently work as a "Senior Procurement Analyst" for a worldwide staffing company. I'm also a freelance writer, mostly covering videogames and computers (primarily right now I'm writing a home videogame and computer history book for a major publisher, though I continue to write for print and online). I co-run Armchair Arcade, which will have a major re-launch soon. I'm into bodybuilding and have an extensive videogame and computer collection covering everything from the 70's through to the present day.

I have yet to find my ideal job. In fact I've been surprised where life has taken me after graduation with a BA in Communications. For the past 10 years, I've been mostly involved in business areas. Certainly my computing and technology has served me well in many ways (easily taking to any new technology or software), as has my ability to write (few have strong writing skills). Nevertheless, I'm continuing to pursue an exclusive working existence focused on videogames and computers. I've been surprised where I've come since I've been targeting such an idea since late 2003, and I expect great things with a little more elbow grease. For now, my main job pays the bills and supports my family, who always takes precedence over everything else... (I have another child on the way, with a beautiful 17 month old daughter already proving to be a handful...)

Erik
April 10th, 2006, 08:57 AM
I've been doing software development in one way shape or form for the last 25 years or so. I got my first programming job while still in High School and worked my way through college and beyond doing software.

I've been with my current company the longest, by just a bit - almost 10 years.

alexkerhead
April 10th, 2006, 03:11 PM
I goto RedNeck's(I am one too, but not like the people I work for) houses and/or trailors and fix their computers.......nuff said....lame
Alls awhile going to college and running a computer museum. Truth be told, I post the most from school, and late night from home. I only sleep 4 hours a night. Trained myself to function 100% on 4 hours...lol

CP/M User
April 10th, 2006, 07:55 PM
It's interesting to compare threads between Forums, it's wise to note that while everyone has an interest in computers, people's work doesn't necessarily revolve around computers all the time. But yeah, computers are a big thing now & regardless of wherever you work - you maybe using such a device. And of course there's people who are doing the more full-on jobs.

At the moment I think the computer based work is leading 2 to 1. But for how long? ;-)

If anyone is interesting in the other thread (which has a slightly different approach) though same intent can find it here (http://www.cpczone.net/boards/index.php?showtopic=621).

But yeah, for myself my course will be finished by the end of the year & before that will have to look into some areas for which there maybe work or perhaps move onto a more advanced course.

Cheers,
CP/M User.

CP/M User
April 10th, 2006, 08:09 PM
Erik wrote:

> I've been doing software development in one way shape
> or form for the last 25 years or so. I got my first
> programming job while still in High School and worked
> my way through college and beyond doing software.

> I've been with my current company the longest, by
> just a bit - almost 10 years.

Yeah, to me it sounds like you were able to get into that type
of job at the right time. Not sure I maybe guessing, but
nowadays Software Development sounds more like course upon
course upon course to get anywhere?

To be honest I was a little silly trying to persue this cause
I just seemed like maths is the core to programming & of
course I lived a little denial by saying I was a little better
at Maths than what I was. Now I more than happy to approach
programming as a hobby rather than career.

How did you find getting into this field Erik, was it at all
difficult to get into?
From my point of view I think a few people were disappointed
when the Diploma of Technology course finished (when I
finished in 1998) & some who did want to do Programming felt
they had to do a specific Uni course to get anywhere - but
thought it's all a progession thing where you needed to be
familiar with the latest languages.

Cheers,
CP/M User.

CP/M User
April 10th, 2006, 08:20 PM
alexkerhead wrote:

> I goto RedNeck's(I am one too, but not like the
> people I work for) houses and/or trailors and fix
> their computers.......nuff said....lame

Oh Dear, sounds like you're not enjoying it then? How do you
fix their computers, is it more of a replace this or that or
do you have a way of mending a dodgy Hard Disk, Floppy Disk,
or is the business something else which involves restoring
computers, backups, installations for instance. Sorry if I
sound too curious - you've got me hooked by not saying
much! ;-)

> Alls awhile going to college and running a computer
> museum. Truth be told, I post the most from school,
> and late night from home. I only sleep 4 hours a
> night. Trained myself to function 100% on 4
> hours...lol

How does the Computer museum hold up business wise - to me it
just sounds like a little somthing on the side. 4 hours sleep
doesn't sound good mate. If I did something like that I'd
probably use a whole day just sleeping.

CP/M User.

alexkerhead
April 10th, 2006, 08:41 PM
alexkerhead wrote:

> I goto RedNeck's(I am one too, but not like the
> people I work for) houses and/or trailors and fix
> their computers.......nuff said....lame

Oh Dear, sounds like you're not enjoying it then? How do you
fix their computers, is it more of a replace this or that or
do you have a way of mending a dodgy Hard Disk, Floppy Disk,
or is the business something else which involves restoring
computers, backups, installations for instance. Sorry if I
sound too curious - you've got me hooked by not saying
much! ;-)

> Alls awhile going to college and running a computer
> museum. Truth be told, I post the most from school,
> and late night from home. I only sleep 4 hours a
> night. Trained myself to function 100% on 4
> hours...lol

How does the Computer museum hold up business wise - to me it
just sounds like a little somthing on the side. 4 hours sleep
doesn't sound good mate. If I did something like that I'd
probably use a whole day just sleeping.

CP/M User.
The business if mainly just...If it is broke, find out why, and fix it. Charge for work.
I don't profit on the museum, what I meant was the time I spend running the website, and collecting the machines, I love em too much to make money off them.
I work 15-20 hours a week on customer jobs. and 10 hours a week fixing my site, and collecting old computers. And 15 hours a week in school. So a full time job worth of stuff..lol, luckily I enjoy old computers and school, so only the customer work is boring, but I have to pay for these vintage toys somehow. The other time is spent with my family, dog, and internet..lol
To work off of 4 hours sleep, you have to spend months tuning your body to adjust the energy better, and it helps I am on blood pressure meds that lower my heart rate...so my body burns calories slower.
My hobbies, I bowl, and mess with my old computers. I am a league bowler..
I just need to write an autobiography on my site, and just link it....maybe tommorrow night.

CP/M User
April 10th, 2006, 08:50 PM
Bill_Loguidice wrote:

> I presently work as a "Senior Procurement Analyst"
> for a worldwide staffing company. I'm also a
> freelance writer, mostly covering videogames and
> computers (primarily right now I'm writing a home
> videogame and computer history book for a major
> publisher, though I continue to write for print and
> online). I co-run Armchair Arcade, which will have a
> major re-launch soon. I'm into bodybuilding and have
> an extensive videogame and computer collection
> covering everything from the 70's through to the
> present day.

Excellent.

> I have yet to find my ideal job. In fact I've been
> surprised where life has taken me after graduation
> with a BA in Communications. For the past 10 years,
> I've been mostly involved in business areas.
> Certainly my computing and technology has served me
> well in many ways (easily taking to any new
> technology or software), as has my ability to write
> (few have strong writing skills). Nevertheless, I'm
> continuing to pursue an exclusive working existence
> focused on videogames and computers. I've been
> surprised where I've come since I've been targeting
> such an idea since late 2003, and I expect great
> things with a little more elbow grease. For now, my
> main job pays the bills and supports my family, who
> always takes precedence over everything else... (I
> have another child on the way, with a beautiful 17
> month old daughter already proving to be a
> handful...)

Interesting you're saying that your still looking for most
ideal job. Some use to tell me that if they ended up writing
reviews for Games for some Magazine, then that would be their
ideal job - however I respect each to their own opinion, when
I think about it, that kind of job may become repetitive after
a while (correct me if I'm wrong - cause I haven't really
being in that field of work to really know). Intersting to
note that your on a high since 2003 & everything's going nice
& swiftly.
Just for the ideas thing, personally I get these ideas &
unfortunately may mention it to somebody else - in the
business side of things I feel the need to be very careful
about discussing ideas to others in case they get ripped off -
would people here say that you should be cautious in this
regard?
Personally though, I've found to have a slight advantage with
my computer expertese while studying. It's not all computer
relevent - but a lot of the work is & if it's being some kind
of promotional poster or something - I've done all kinds of
things presentation wise - the teachers can't believe what I
produce - I must admit though that prior to last year I was a
little rusty last year due to using the computer for a couple
of things, but it all seems to simply come back in time.

Business wise, myself I finished my studies at the end of 1998
& got some work mid 1999 which involved Mail Opening, a little
bit of Data Entry & mail sorting. This was a very short term 3
month job (originally it should have been 6 months - but the
amount of work done in a day was staggerning).
Fortunately this work lead to another job (with the same Govt
Body), started early 2000 & went all the way up til August
2001. This was perhaps the hardest form of work I stayed with
until my contract ceased (with some 300 other people) 2001.
This involved processing forms, making the occasional call to
clients & fixing up their enquiry's. All this was behind a
computer & to me felt somewhat repetitive. It was durning this
period I was able to save up - buy a decent car, perhaps
fortunate it didn't lead to full time, cause around Nov. 2002
I went back to my youthful self & seeking out possibilities of
careers out in the environment.

Along the way I've done some other work, things like Grounds
Maintenance which was good for when it lasted & got some work
last year doing more full on Bush work. I did a couple of
other things like Nursery hand work - though found it to be
too Physically demanding & was only there for a couple of
weeks to trial the work.

Cheers,
CP/M User.

Terry Yager
April 10th, 2006, 09:43 PM
Hey, I can sleep for four hours a nite...when I take my sleeping pill...on the nights they choose to work. Normal for me is and has been my whole life, about two hours on most nights, with mebbe one or two nights a week that I don't sleep at all.

--T

CP/M User
April 10th, 2006, 10:02 PM
Terry Yager wrote:

> Hey, I can sleep for four hours a nite...when I take
> my sleeping pill...on the nights they choose to work.
> Normal for me is and has been my whole life, about
> two hours on most nights, with mebbe one or two
> nights a week that I don't sleep at all.

Never have taken a sleeping pill - which is an archievement
I'm proud to have. However, I uptil last week I was having
trouble sleep wise by waking up around 4:50am & not being able
to get back to sleep. I think this was stress related (I went
to Hospital last Wednesday - or Tuesday for those a day
behind), much better now, but slowly recoverning.

A friend of mine suggested Counting Sheep, which works
occassionally, but what I found was better was counting from
1-10 very quickly & continously (so it becomes quickly
repetitive). I think this works a bit better than counting "1
sheep, 2 sheep, 3 sheep, etc" & cause you're doing it fast it
works well at blocking out whatever is on the mind.

CP/M User.

dreddnott
April 11th, 2006, 01:14 PM
I think most of you have figured out my line of work already, at least if you've read my thread in the Collections forum.

I'm not only in charge of reclamation and refurbishment, but I was immediately saddled with the co-responsibility (along with eBay guy) of administering all of the office computers (which are Dells made from spare parts, not one actually paid for new), the main server (got root, well, Administrator password on it anyways), and the DSL modem/router (so they can blame us instead of crappy Verizon for any problems). I also have the pleasure of building the company's new servers and testing machines (using Netfinity (xSeries), eServer, and Poweredge boxes).

When I arrived to work at the warehouse, the network was a hopeless spaghetti tangle mess with 10BaseT hubs all over the place and about a half-mile of CAT5 going nowhere. A week or so after my supervisor quit to work for Geek Squad (making $1/hour more...), eBay guy and I single-handedly (double-handedly?) rewired the entire network, routed and crimped the cables ourselves, and reduced the LAN components to a single 26-port 10/100 switch (2 of the ports are gigabit!). Downtime for personnel was 5 or 10 minutes.

Then about a month later I realised that although we had an MSDN subscription, with a big fat folder of DVDs full of ISOs for everything Microsoft makes now, we were using HACKED copies of Windows XP Professional with fake serials and cracked activation DLLs on *every* office and warehouse computer. The only legitimate one was the original server! So I took it upon myself to use our legitimate copy of Windows 2000 on all of the company's PCs...this involved making a master hard drive image, copying it to ten others and standardising the hardware in all of the Dells to match. Needless to say, it was a bit more efficient than crashy XP with unlimited permissions. All the computers really need to do is act as an MS Terminal Server client for Remote Desktop work.

So far I've received nothing from the company besides my mandatory 3-month $0.25 raise from the California minimum wage of $6.75. Pearls before swine, I guess.

In fact, on top of all this garbage, it looks like I'll be setting up the company's MS Exchange server when we migrate from off-site e-mail to on-site. At least it'll be on one of the nifty boxes I've built them - either the Netfinity with 15 drives in 3 channels (RAID5'ed) or maybe the xSeries, with 6GB of RAM...I might even be able to put in a purchase request for the 3 additional Xeon 700 processors that machine needs...I practically had to beg for a $200 UPS, even though the power went out every day for about two months! We lose it every week or so now, and it's mostly to them tinkering with the new panel and not so much the breakers overheating. Last week in fact they pulled the ground wire for the upstairs box (where I work) and I lost a UPS and a surge suppressor. Blammo.

Needless to say I'm looking forward to my second interview with a local elementary school district for Artist-in-residence, or music teacher, which pays $18/hour, and only 30 hours per week, 9 to 3, instead of 40 hours per week, 7 to 3:30 (I only get a 1/2 hour lunch here). My best bud from college choir has the job currently and recommended me, so I'm hoping for the best.

DOS-Master
April 19th, 2006, 10:26 PM
I used to design burgalur alarms for black and decker but now I work for unisys and erase old files all day

CP/M User
April 20th, 2006, 01:16 AM
DOS-Master wrote:

> I used to design burgalur alarms for black and decker
> but now I work for unisys and erase old files all day

As well as stop by & post many posts within the day! My Gawd!

CP/M User.

DOS-Master
April 20th, 2006, 01:46 AM
DOS-Master wrote:

> I used to design burgalur alarms for black and decker
> but now I work for unisys and erase old files all day

As well as stop by & post many posts within the day! My Gawd!

CP/M User.

hey buddy ever heard of different time zones. i've been posting all NIGHT besides it doesn't take much energy erasing data and naming files and placing them in folders

Erik
April 20th, 2006, 05:36 AM
Well, now, is CP/M User jealous?? :D

Hehe. Just kidding man. . . ;)

carlsson
April 20th, 2006, 06:29 AM
DOS-Master just did what I often do when I come to a new forum; go through most of the old threads to see if there is something interesting to say and post if there is. Most people get a bit annoyed to "bump" up old threads. I don't understand that attitude, as long as it is on topic and the thread previously contained false information or questions not answered.

Erik
April 20th, 2006, 06:49 AM
DOS-Master just did what I often do when I come to a new forum; go through most of the old threads to see if there is something interesting to say and post if there is.

Exactly.

Most people get a bit annoyed to "bump" up old threads. I don't understand that attitude, as long as it is on topic and the thread previously contained false information or questions not answered.

I hope it's not most. I can see some people maybe being annoyed, but in general what's the difference? We've had some interesting discussions in the past and there's no reason for most of them to be forgotten, especially since we've got a whole bunch of new members onboard now, right? There's almost always something to add.

It's not like anyone's pulled up a 2 year old "for sale" message and asked to buy the item for $1! :D

DOS-Master
April 20th, 2006, 09:28 AM
Well, now, is CP/M User jealous?? :D

Hehe. Just kidding man. . . ;)

lol he probly works at walmart

Erik
April 20th, 2006, 09:36 AM
lol he probly works at walmart

Hey, let's not get mean now. . .

Actually, I guess he could work there. I doubt it, though. ;)

Terry Yager
April 20th, 2006, 09:47 AM
hey buddy ever heard of different time zones. i've been posting all NIGHT besides it doesn't take much energy erasing data and naming files and placing them in folders

CP/M U can post stuff tommorrow...(or is it yesterday)??? I'm sooo confuzed...

--T

DOS-Master
April 20th, 2006, 10:13 AM
Hey, let's not get mean now. . .

Actually, I guess he could work there. I doubt it, though. ;)

well he's makin fun of me! gees yell at him why don't you

Erik
April 20th, 2006, 11:01 AM
well he's makin fun of me! gees yell at him why don't you

I wasn't yelling at either of you, or anyone for that matter. I just pointed out that we want to keep an even keel, that's all. I think that's a good general rule for all of us.

As long as it's all in good fun I don't mind a few barbs or some basic ribbing. I would, however, suggest the use of some smilies to make it obvious that you're not serious. . . ;)

I think a bit of history is in order:

CP/M User is one of the forums first members and was easily the most prolific poster early on. He's still near the top if he's not number one today.

I think (and this is just my interpretation) that he recognized a bit of himself in your posting over the last couple of days and made a sly comment meant to target himself as well as you. I really don't think he was trying to do anything to upset or offend you or anyone else. He was just making a subtle joke.

I'm just trying to make sure that a joke doesn't end up causing a blow-up or hurt feelings.

I'll butt out now. . . :)

DOS-Master
April 20th, 2006, 11:29 AM
ok i'm cool with that

Terry Yager
April 20th, 2006, 12:59 PM
I like to tease him about walking around upside-down all day. Y'know, it's the only way he can keep his wet-ware wet. There just ain't enough blood in his whole body to keep that huge brain of his supplied right-side-up.

--T

alexkerhead
April 20th, 2006, 02:18 PM
DOS-Master, if you believe someone is messing with you, inform a moderator, or ignore it. It always works out better that way. Misunderstanding is a huge problem on international(in this case multi state) forums. Ya just have to relax, sit back and think before you post....
Just a tad of advice.

CP/M User
April 20th, 2006, 02:30 PM
Yeah sorry. I wasn't trying to offend - but I must admit it's
produced quite a funny thread! :-D

Most of all I don't care if you'd posted 1000 posts a day!
Okay so I went a little too far - hey that's just me! :-)

By all mean's if you have the time to do this stuff -
regardless of the hour feel free!

CP/M User.

CP/M User
April 20th, 2006, 02:35 PM
Terry Yager wrote:

> I like to tease him about walking around upside-down
> all day. Y'know, it's the only way he can keep his
> wet-ware wet. There just ain't enough blood in his
> whole body to keep that huge brain of his supplied
> right-side-up.

Boy it's a wonder how you lot just don't slide off the
equator! LOL ;-) That'd make the North Pole the only safe
place to be! ;-)

CP/M User.

Terry Yager
April 20th, 2006, 02:37 PM
Hey, it's easy...ya just throw-out the ol' anchor and hang right on...

--T

CP/M User
April 20th, 2006, 02:45 PM
alexkerhead wrote:

> DOS-Master, if you believe someone is messing with
> you, inform a moderator, or ignore it. It always
> works out better that way.

It's a bit difficult to judge, it could simply be interpreted
as someone returning the favour, or like you said - someone
who took the matter too seriously. Either way I sincerely hope
the DOS-Master stays & continues to post valuable input - or
have some fun & play around a little.

As it is he hasn't PMed me with hate messages & it's
certainally an avenue DOS-Master could have taken.

CP/M User.

DOS-Master
April 20th, 2006, 02:58 PM
don't worry man ur cool I just took you too serious

Terry Yager
April 20th, 2006, 03:51 PM
Hey, no offense...I could pm you some hate-mail, if ya really want some...

--T

DOS-Master
April 20th, 2006, 04:42 PM
go ahead i dont care

CP/M User
April 20th, 2006, 06:09 PM
Terry Yager wrote:

> Hey, no offense...I could pm you some hate-mail, if
> ya really want some...

Ermmmmm!

alexkerhead
April 20th, 2006, 07:58 PM
Hey, no offense...I could pm you some hate-mail, if ya really want some...

--T

Maybe someone can grow up(mentally of course).:oha:

Terry Yager
April 20th, 2006, 08:43 PM
Maybe someone can grow up(mentally of course).:oha:

Who, me? (Sorry, didn't mean to rile ya)...

--T

CP/M User
April 20th, 2006, 09:00 PM
Terry Yager wrote:

> Who, me? (Sorry, didn't mean to rile ya)...

Ouch!!, personally that goes against everything I believe in!

CP/M User.

Terry Yager
April 20th, 2006, 09:23 PM
Terry Yager wrote:

> Who, me? (Sorry, didn't mean to rile ya)...

Ouch!!, personally that goes against everything I believe in!

CP/M User.

<singing, badly off-key>...I don't wanna grow up, I'm a Toyz R Us kid...

--T

alexkerhead
April 20th, 2006, 09:49 PM
Who, me? (Sorry, didn't mean to rile ya)...

--T
-hints to emoticon- It was a joke..Indicated by the emot..lol
:bigups:

CP/M User
April 20th, 2006, 10:41 PM
alexkerhead wrote:

> -hints to emoticon- It was a joke..Indicated by the
> emot..lol


http://img101.imageshack.us/img101/6744/sneaky0cz.jpgSome April Fools day joke! :-D

CP/M User.

CP/M User
November 12th, 2007, 11:52 PM
************************************************** *******************************************

Well moving on from all that I've being working since January 2nd this year at one of the massive housing estates (just out the back of Burke! ;-)

I've just being promoted to Chief Technical Weed Supervisor :-o Who's position is to co-ordinate and form a strategy of keeping weeds (or unwanted plants) out.

The problem with this position (being an estate) is the number of complaints recieved from local residents, rest assured work has commenced on areas which present the most problems, eventually the results will leave areas looking good for them.

Personally in my position I try to use the friendlest methods to the environment possible, I hate using Herbicides because they don't offer any permanent solution, the area is very Windy and when combined with spray makes a serious health hazard.

Sharkonwheels
November 14th, 2007, 06:37 PM
I've just being promoted to Chief Technical Weed Supervisor :-o Who's position is to co-ordinate and form a strategy of keeping weeds (or unwanted plants) out.[/FONT]


Hah!

Dude - you're TOO much. Chief Technical Weed Supervisor. :mrgreen::mrgreen:

Heh.

Well - I never added my 2 cents:

I, obviously, work for a Cruise Line IT department.

Title says, and I quote:
"Ship Systems Analyst/Programmer"

Except, I don't analyze squat, and the only thing I program, is my PDA or TV remote. I was always partial to "IT Ship Systems Engineer," as that was a good, generic catch-all!

'nuff said on that...

Basically, I support the IT behind the Casinos on our 7 newest ships, and have now inherited the logistics/maintenance system, ballast control system (I THINK that's what it is) and NOx monitoring system.

<raising glass to toast> Here's to no sleep!


Tony

Terry Yager
November 14th, 2007, 06:46 PM
So, uh...when are you gonna share with us the cheat codez to make those slot machines kick-out some big buck$???

--T

Sharkonwheels
November 14th, 2007, 07:45 PM
Heh - don;t even know if that exists.

You should SEE what slot machine manufacturers go through for approvals.
Even on the Casino Mgmt Software side!!!

Those gaming commissions are HARD on them, and they spend ALOT of time with the machines/software doing testing!


T

Big Blues
November 15th, 2007, 02:50 PM
I wasn't back in the board when this thread was posted, or else I would have pointed out that a MSDN subscription is for one and only one developer. If you take a MSDN subscription and install it all across the company, MS gets pissed. How anal are they?

I remember in a MSDN FAQ back in 2001, it said (paraphrased): I have a legitimate copy of Windows 2000 installed on my machine. I was prompted to insert the Win2k CD, but I'm not sure where it is. My coworker has a MSDN subscription. Can I use his CD.

Answer: No.

Yes, they are that anal about them.





I think most of you have figured out my line of work already, at least if you've read my thread in the Collections forum.

I'm not only in charge of reclamation and refurbishment, but I was immediately saddled with the co-responsibility (along with eBay guy) of administering all of the office computers (which are Dells made from spare parts, not one actually paid for new), the main server (got root, well, Administrator password on it anyways), and the DSL modem/router (so they can blame us instead of crappy Verizon for any problems). I also have the pleasure of building the company's new servers and testing machines (using Netfinity (xSeries), eServer, and Poweredge boxes).

When I arrived to work at the warehouse, the network was a hopeless spaghetti tangle mess with 10BaseT hubs all over the place and about a half-mile of CAT5 going nowhere. A week or so after my supervisor quit to work for Geek Squad (making $1/hour more...), eBay guy and I single-handedly (double-handedly?) rewired the entire network, routed and crimped the cables ourselves, and reduced the LAN components to a single 26-port 10/100 switch (2 of the ports are gigabit!). Downtime for personnel was 5 or 10 minutes.

Then about a month later I realised that although we had an MSDN subscription, with a big fat folder of DVDs full of ISOs for everything Microsoft makes now, we were using HACKED copies of Windows XP Professional with fake serials and cracked activation DLLs on *every* office and warehouse computer. The only legitimate one was the original server! So I took it upon myself to use our legitimate copy of Windows 2000 on all of the company's PCs...this involved making a master hard drive image, copying it to ten others and standardising the hardware in all of the Dells to match. Needless to say, it was a bit more efficient than crashy XP with unlimited permissions. All the computers really need to do is act as an MS Terminal Server client for Remote Desktop work.

So far I've received nothing from the company besides my mandatory 3-month $0.25 raise from the California minimum wage of $6.75. Pearls before swine, I guess.

In fact, on top of all this garbage, it looks like I'll be setting up the company's MS Exchange server when we migrate from off-site e-mail to on-site. At least it'll be on one of the nifty boxes I've built them - either the Netfinity with 15 drives in 3 channels (RAID5'ed) or maybe the xSeries, with 6GB of RAM...I might even be able to put in a purchase request for the 3 additional Xeon 700 processors that machine needs...I practically had to beg for a $200 UPS, even though the power went out every day for about two months! We lose it every week or so now, and it's mostly to them tinkering with the new panel and not so much the breakers overheating. Last week in fact they pulled the ground wire for the upstairs box (where I work) and I lost a UPS and a surge suppressor. Blammo.

Needless to say I'm looking forward to my second interview with a local elementary school district for Artist-in-residence, or music teacher, which pays $18/hour, and only 30 hours per week, 9 to 3, instead of 40 hours per week, 7 to 3:30 (I only get a 1/2 hour lunch here). My best bud from college choir has the job currently and recommended me, so I'm hoping for the best.

CP/M User
November 15th, 2007, 09:47 PM
Sharkonwheels wrote:

Hah!

Dude - you're TOO much. Chief Technical Weed Supervisor. :mrgreen::mrgreen:

Heh.

But that's what I am, what do you mean by "Too much", I'm paid Too much or I do Too much work? The job doesn't exactly give me an instant house Downtown Burke, though at least I'm not begging for Money!

Guess the joke is the Supervisor bit - this Supervisor has no staff to manage - so this Supervisor manages themselves! :-o Guess that's for the best since the only way to get this job done properly is to do it yourself! I have a rival though in "The Waterboy", it's their job to get the plants into the garden beds. Their problem seems to be getting enough mulch around the plants - it's ridiculous how little they use - might as well plant the weeds instead of plants.

Well - I never added my 2 cents:

I, obviously, work for a Cruise Line IT department.

Title says, and I quote:
"Ship Systems Analyst/Programmer"

Except, I don't analyze squat, and the only thing I program, is my PDA or TV remote. I was always partial to "IT Ship Systems Engineer," as that was a good, generic catch-all!

'nuff said on that...

That would be pretty cool to get a free trip with your job - I wonder though how you would get away with looking down at a screen on a boat though - I always get sea sick if I look down on a boat (I guess a good deal of people would though).

carlsson
November 15th, 2007, 10:42 PM
I think Sharky thought the job title was too much fun to take seriously. It is not like you would print business cards that say "Chief Technical Weed Supervisor" on them? I like how you describe you have a rival in "The Waterboy". In my mind I can see a pastich of the 1960's Batman series where you are "Weedman" in green tights, stopping Waterboy from doing evil deeds to the city gardens.

CP/M User
November 16th, 2007, 01:57 AM
carlsson wrote:

I think Sharky thought the job title was too much fun to take seriously. It is not like you would print business cards that say "Chief Technical Weed Supervisor" on them?

The only place I could imagine anybody doing business cards saying "Chief Technical Weed Supervisor" is at a "Friends group". Although people there wouldn't need to know about your "Supervisor" status (why would they care), "Chief Technical Weed Controller" would have more relevance, though us bushies don't really need business cards to advertise ourselves, we simply show people what we do in our work.

I like how you describe you have a rival in "The Waterboy". In my mind I can see a pastich of the 1960's Batman series where you are "Weedman" in green tights, stopping Waterboy from doing evil deeds to the city gardens.

Yeah, we're just missing the Batcave! :-D

Mad-Mike
November 17th, 2007, 08:59 AM
I now do contract work for a computer manufacturer at the local airplane plant. Most of my day is spent moving machines around and configuring them for end users. I've now got to work to get back up to the standard level that I was at before I took that damn video game job, never again am I taking anything from Aerotek.

CP/M User
November 17th, 2007, 12:05 PM
Mad-Mike wrote:

I now do contract work for a computer manufacturer at the local airplane plant. Most of my day is spent moving machines around and configuring them for end users. I've now got to work to get back up to the standard level that I was at before I took that damn video game job, never again am I taking anything from Aerotek.

May I ask what happened with the Video Game Job?

Sounds a bit of a shame really, I've been a bit fortunate in that while I've had many jobs I feel there have only been a couple of times (when I was doing all sorts of work in 2004) where my wages were lower than the previous jobs I had.

Now I seem to confident as to how much my line of work actually pays, there was some website somewhere which allows you to look up the type of work you're doing and how much it generally pays.

Some jobs are worse than others and some are incredibly low paying for the amount of hard physical work they bring.

CP/M User.

Sharkonwheels
November 17th, 2007, 04:47 PM
I now do contract work for a computer manufacturer at the local airplane plant. Most of my day is spent moving machines around and configuring them for end users. I've now got to work to get back up to the standard level that I was at before I took that damn video game job, never again am I taking anything from Aerotek.

Aerotek the IT contracting company?
If so, down here in S. Florida, they switched their name to Tek Systems MANY years ago.

They found me some pretty good contracts, and a couple contract-to-perm gigs.

T

barythrin
June 17th, 2010, 02:36 PM
Wow.. ok long thread but we have new folks and I've been curious about a few of ya anyway. So what do you all do for a living? If you already posted, have things changed since? To keep it a little vintage has your experience or memories with vintage computers affected your current choice profession or current job/talents?

Guess I missed the thread or got caught up with the misconstrued comments originally. I've done a few jobs from programming, to helpdesk/support, and now I'm more server oriented but also support some desktops if they need it as well as some network and security configuration and support. It's an odd field where we all do quite a lot for a smaller team, so Windows server and linux (here it's usually gentoo) maintenance, implementation and all the rest.

Since I was a kid with our first home computer that my dad brought home when I was 5 or 6 it was the most interesting thing in the world to me. I couldn't believe how it would seemingly talk to my dad and interact back with him from keystrokes that I didn't understand. I immediately wanted to know everyone about how it worked so yes, that lead me to my current career path although I'd truly like to go into full time computer security but that's a tough step to make.

How about the rest of ya current posters?

Bill_Loguidice
June 17th, 2010, 03:03 PM
My main job is as a corporate and technical writer for an IT consulting firm, a position I've had for just over three years. I also am a freelance writer (articles, mostly) and have had a few books published with major publishers (Vintage Games, and Wii Fitness for Dummies), with more presently in the proposal stage. I'm also working as a writer and producer on a feature film documentary on the history of videogames for Lux Digital Pictures. This Sunday I should be interviewing Nolan Bushnell in NYC for the film. That pretty much sums up my freelance activities.

Certainly my interest in/passion for both videogames and computers from a very young age have influenced me in a wide variety of ways, including my career path. I also spend way too much of my money on a large videogame and computer collection...

lyonadmiral
June 17th, 2010, 05:59 PM
I used to design burgalur alarms for black and decker but now I work for unisys and erase old files all day

One of my coworkers use to work for them (Unisys) back when it was Burroughs on the large systems. It is interesting listening to him tell stories of how things use to be, and how you had to use an oscilliscope to test anything.

strollin
June 17th, 2010, 08:57 PM
I currently work as a sr software developer for a major software company. I worked for a smaller firm that got bought in 2007. I've worked in software for the last 25 years. Prior to that I worked as an electronics tech on mainframe disk drives.

brad162
June 18th, 2010, 06:26 PM
I currently work as a sr software developer for a major software company. I worked for a smaller firm that got bought in 2007. I've worked in software for the last 25 years. Prior to that I worked as an electronics tech on mainframe disk drives.

Well i kind of have two jobs and go to school.. I go to Arizona State for Engineering part time, while i work at T-Mobile doing sales and whatever else needs done, and i also do pc repair/system building as my own side business. If i can get the pc repair a little more steady, i could actually break off t-mobile and just do that, but the benefits at T-Mobile are too good for me to do that anytime soon.

egnuldt
July 1st, 2010, 08:38 PM
Just a college student.

I worked at a place for a month during Christmas break from Dec 09-Jan 10. The company didnt have any money so they couldnt pay anybody and they were on there last crutch. I have a scholarship to go to school so I really wasnt hurting. I decided to spend a large percentage of my online gambling winnings and started buying a bunch of old stuff I found at the company (just to see if I could help them out). I was really only interested in old (relatively speaking) nintendo games/systems. There wasnt too many video game other than Atari stuff and pinball machines so I ended up buying those. A few days later I found some oscilloscopes..... I had no idea what Oscilloscopes were and I ended up buying about 25 of them (all for around $10 each). I had no clue about anything I bought but I saw calibration stickers from 1978 and just bought what ever I could (most of it was older engineering equipment). I've always collected old football cards so it really wasnt something totally out of the blue - rather I just expanded my collection of "vintage" items. I bought a bunch of TRS-80 "keyboards" one day (only to later find out that they were actually the computer), so I decided to shell out money for everything else TRS-80 related. I thought Heathkits "looked cool/old" so ended up buying those as well. Whats funny is i've never really been into computers/electronic equipment/etc up until I started to take a look at what I had. I remember that our company needed an additional $500 to pay some back rent they owed, so I ended up selling the first item I ever had.. on ebay, and it was an Atari Cat Box.. almost enough to pay the back rent for that week.

I've never really checked what I had because I left the company (because the semester break was over) and I went back to college (and I go out of state to attend college so I was never to check what I had during college). I came back from college about a month ago and just recently started to take a look of what I ended up buying.

Dave Farquhar
July 2nd, 2010, 03:03 PM
These days I'm primarily a computer security consultant. I've been doing Windows Server administration, and OS/2 server administration before that, for about 12 years. I also have some Unix and Linux experience, but that's always been my secondary role, at most. I can do desktop support in an emergency. I've supported networks of up to 1,000 computers and up to 20,000 users.

I'm a published author, but haven't published anything computer related since 2001 or 2002. I published a book for O'Reilly in 2000 about tweaking Windows 95/98 for performance. But the timing was all wrong so it didn't sell very well. We really should have done that book about Windows 2000 instead, in retrospect, because the power users I was trying to reach moved in that direction really fast. I thought I did some pretty cool stuff in that book though. I showed how to edit INF files and repackage CABs and get Windows 95 to install in as little as 17 megs of disk space, with no MSN, no MS Mail client, and none of the other non-essential yet un-optional components.

lyonadmiral
July 2nd, 2010, 05:10 PM
I've really got two jobs. My "day" job is working for an educational consortium (BOCES) in New York State, and what we do is offer managed IT services to school districts. I've been directly or indirectly responsible for school system networks with as few as 10 machines up to a thousand machines. In the consortium we're a really big team, so we're not completely responsible end to end, just usually whatever is on the district side of the router. My night job is being the proprietor and president of a services company. We've done all sorts of things over the years, computers have been a baseline for all of it and we do consulting work for non-government & residential systems, but primary focus now on political activism.

Anonymous Freak
February 8th, 2011, 04:43 PM
If I had replied when this thread first started, the answer would have been "run a small on-site computer consulting company".

Now it's "work as lead support engineer at an enterprise software firm".

dabone
February 8th, 2011, 05:30 PM
I hold the title where I work of Resident Geek, I'm the tech/system builder/preinstallation expert/networking answer guy for a small computer distributor.We sell computers to the local computer resellers and support their techs, so I'm tech support for techs. I have been working on computers for a living full time for the last 23 years, and getting odd jobs working on them for a few years before that. I also used to work for Unisys.
I still love getting to come home to my old toys. I enjoy being able to repair machines on a chip level, not just the toss a board in like we do will all the modern equipment.
(yes we could fix some boards with caps, but it still costs more labor than a new one)

Later,
dabone

deathshadow
February 8th, 2011, 06:17 PM
Prematurely retired due to failing health (including non-24 sleep/wake syndrome, medication induced parkinsonism because doctors are idiots, and being legally blind)... Though I still do freelance web development since frankly, I don't think these kids know what they're doing.

Well, that's not all... When the weather is nice I go out busking (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Street_performance) on weekends with my EWI (http://www.ewiusb.com/) which brings in a few extra dollars, and during the spring run a small bicycle building/repair service out of my garage... which is why my own ride is so pimped (http://files.myopera.com/deathshadow/albums/2434721/toosexy.jpg) (cheap bike + replacement cranks + replacement BB + replacement rims + replacement tires + replacement grips + homebrew lamps/battery pack == WIN). I'm even 'green' -- I recycle laptop battery packs to make the packs for my bicycle lamps. (typically 3 to 5 Cree Q5 LED's, giving about the same brightness as a pair of car headlamps)

Having that nice ride is important too, since I'm on doctors orders to ride 20 miles a day... Hence why I'm down to a nice 198 pounds from the 260 I ballooned up to at the peak of being ill/bedridden. (my target being my old fighting trim of 170)

commodorejohn
February 8th, 2011, 06:47 PM
I work as an IT grunt at a call center in Duluth. Not a glorious or high-paying job, but the workload is light and I have explicit free reign over my downtime, so most of my day is spent fiddling around with my various personal projects. Getting paid to do mostly what I'd be doing anyway = an okay job in my book :)

Personally speaking, I enjoy a wide variety of things. I like to draw, write, compose, and code, so naturally a lot of my free time is spent on those activities or their intersection: game programming. I have a few different game projects I've been toying with for a while, and I hope to get one done this year as part of the MSXdev (http://msxdev.msxblue.com/) competition.

When I'm not engaged in creative pursuits, I'm generally either playing games on one of my various retro machines, reading, or listening to music. (Respective preferences: action/adventure, well-written manga, classic progressive rock.)

wolfie
February 8th, 2011, 08:47 PM
i load and unload tractor trailers 1 day a week.

CP/M User
February 15th, 2011, 01:28 AM
Well since I started this thread in 2006 (nearly 5 years ago! :nervous:), I've gone from being Student which I completed in 2006 to "Chief Technical Weed Supervisor" which I was doing for a good 3 years, and now I'm situated in a range of local bushlands controlling weeds in those places! ;) I'm doing a range of jobs and a range of control methods for dealing with unwanted plants, on the side I do a little bit of consulting and advising along with a little bit of recording on the computer! :nervous: The last job I had I really liked even though it wasn't quite in the right field based on the qualifications I obtained from my course at the end of 2006. The job I'm doing now is relevant, though has a lot more hazards associated with it. Like my last job the people are good to work for which is at least better than some stiff-upper-lip who clocks you in and out all the time - including Toilet breaks!

When I came to this forum in May 2003 (not long after it started), I was pretty much out of work and working for the government (so they would pay their small wage). Ironically, it's that line of work which can be simular to what I'm doing now. I was probably in the phase of removing my computer riddled past by opening new things such as the Environment. From that I know it doesn't take me much to simply pickup and use a computer if I had to - modern computers are a tool to construct various operations on! :)

Vintage Computers comes as a hobby, I took up other jobs away from computers when I had finally realised it's all about the old computers - particularly my CPC6128 since I've been using a CPC464 since I was a kid. In recent times - 2010 til now I've been sort of back on that bandwagon, though it's all being going cause everything I've been doing as been in some sort of moderation. Playing around with it again has been good & bad, though in a sense good when I've been able to problem solve things or even solve things on my own! :nervous: Environment has it's good and bad, I've been keeping myself away from the bad, even though my job had put me there, I have to take the good with the bad with that and can at least avoid environmental protests, one has to draw the line where one can be of most use I believe and protests are not part of my best interests once Governments had won.

PeterNY
February 17th, 2011, 04:23 AM
My job is in the internal auditing (www.theiia.org), fraud examination (www.acfe.com) and information technology audit & risk (www.isaca.org) field. I am planning to expand into the information technology security (www.issa.org) field this year. My main job is to look for mistakes other people make and writing them up for it. :D

TandyMan100
February 17th, 2011, 05:06 AM
I 'work' at a local computer repair shop. Essentially, that means getting paid on commission for reinstalling windows, removing viruses, and reflowing NVidia graphics chips on laptops.

CP/M User
February 17th, 2011, 09:47 PM
TandyMan100 wrote:

I 'work' at a local computer repair shop. Essentially, that means getting paid on commission for reinstalling windows, removing viruses, and reflowing NVidia graphics chips on laptops.

Gee, I just read about all the bad luck you've been having with your computers, I can see now that your profession is part of what's happening to you personally, still I cannot believe the amount of bad luck you've been having! :o

Rick Ethridge
February 21st, 2011, 09:08 PM
I'm involuntarily retired because society places more stock on the young. I have a current CompTIA A+ certification. In my idle hours I restore, repair or build computers for myself, friends and relatives.