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bettablue
April 10th, 2012, 06:57 PM
Alright everyone. I'm finally getting ready to complete the final assembly of the PC WITH the expansion unit. Everything in the PC is currently working perfectly fine. The expansion unit contains an Intel LAN adapter, modem, Xebec hard drive controller and Miniscribe 11 Meg hard disk drive. So there really isn't a lot of hardware to configure.

What I'm running into is a lack of resources on things like a driver for my IBM 5152 graphics printer and the LAN adapter. Once I have the drivers, I want to configure a set of DOS installation diskettes for DOS 6.22 or DOS 7.0, with both autoexec.bat and config.sys files.

I have the program tool required to get the hard drive set up formatted, and finally ready to install whatever version of DOS I choose. I just need some help with setting up the configuration files and the autoexec.bat so that everything loads properly when I boot from the hard disk.

I'll do the work. I just need to know where to get started. Again, Google has not been very kind in my searches.

Thanks much.

This is the final push to get everything working with the expansion. The system is almost done, so I'm hoping that this will finally be the end of this particular build.

SpidersWeb
April 10th, 2012, 08:35 PM
Well CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT are optional, your printer wont need any drivers, just the LAN card - what network were you going to connect to?

On my 5160 those files are almost completely empty. Without upper memory I avoid loading almost anything on startup haha.

Would recommend an older version of DOS to save disk space unless you are going to use the DOS 6 boot menu feature.

bettablue
April 10th, 2012, 09:06 PM
Well CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT are optional, your printer wont need any drivers, just the LAN card - what network were you going to connect to?

On my 5160 those files are almost completely empty. Without upper memory I avoid loading almost anything on startup haha.

Would recommend an older version of DOS to save disk space unless you are going to use the DOS 6 boot menu feature.

Ah, there's the rub. Now it looks like I have three questions instead of just one.

I was under the impression that the printer needed a driver. What do I need to do, to get the printer working on one of the LPT ports that are installed. Currently, I believe it's installed on LPT1.

I'll be installing DOS and it's configuration files onto the 11 Meg Miniscribe hard disk which is installed into the IBM5161 expansion unit. So, there will be plenty of room for the primary command.com from pretty much any version of DOS. I can suppliment the command.com with the rest of the commands and executables as I see a need for them. That will save some space too.

I guess the big question is simply this, What do I need to get my system running? What do I need to include in my autoexec.bat and config.sys files? I know I have to run the hard disk utility to low level format the disk, then F-Disk, then format all before installing DOS. Do I have to make a bootable floppy diskette with the hard disk configurations before installing DOS? Then what needs to happen to make the computer boot from the hard disk?

I'm not too worried about the LAN adapter or modem. I really want to get the hard disk loaded with DOS, and have my prinmary system working. You can see the systems specs here:
http://www.vintage-computer.com/vcforum/showthread.php?29718-My-IBM-5150-so-far

As for the network, I'll be connecting it to my primary network using a wired connection to my Router which is also directly wired to my Windows 7 computer. I have a seperate folder on the Windows 7 machine that contains all of my programs, DOS maintenance tools, and about 6500 DOS games. A lot of these games will not work with lesser versions of DOS, which is why I want to install the latest version of DOS possible.

There is probably more I'm not thinking about, so your impressions and ideas are greatly appreciated. Am I also overthinking this too, like I've done every other step of the way?

TIA.

Ole Juul
April 10th, 2012, 09:38 PM
You're not talking about just writing the autoexec.bat and config.sys files are you? To my twisted thinking you first need to design a file structure using a logic that suits you. Then you can do the rest.

My preference is for clean and simple. YMMV My C:\ drive only has two directories and the autoexec.bat and config.sys files are hidden and read only. The directory looks like this:


Volume in drive C is ANA-C
Volume Serial Number is 5F9B-C40D
Directory of C:\

PATH EDC 7,866 04-05-12 12:14a
SYS <DIR> 10-08-11 4:38a
TMP <DIR> 10-08-11 4:38a
3 file(s) 7,866 bytes
525,672,448 bytes free
C:\ $


Of course that's a larger machine, but I use the same kind of structure on vintage stuff. The TMP is just that, but the SYS directory is all the system files. Here is the tree:

C:\ $tree
Directory PATH listing for Volume ANA-C
Volume Serial Number is 5F9B-C40D
C:.
----SYS
- ---- ANA
- - ----NOHD
- - ----ANATEMP
- ----0
- ----1
- ----2
- ----F
- ----MS
- - ----ARC
- ----CFG
- - ----BOOT
- - ----WATTCP
- - ----MTCP
----TMP


The directories named 0, 1, and 2, are all the utilities which are likely to be used on the system, or deemed to currently be useful. On an XT it is probably adequate to just use the SYS directory and skip the subs. On a true vintage machine running, say 2.1, I would include all the files in one /OS directory. The MS directory contains the MS-DOS 6.22 files which are to be in the path and the ARC subdirectory of that is all the other MS utilities and things which I don't want to see (which is most of it). The CFG directory is where I keep configurations such as the WATTCP and mTCP ones (with old ones and a bit of related stuff). The BOOT directory is where COMMAND.COM resides and several levels of autoexec.bat and config.sys are backed up. Every time I edit these files, they are automatically backed up so I can go back a couple of levels if I want. It's just easier (and more relaxing) that way.

Now, the one I haven't mentioned yet, is the C:\SYS\F directory. That is the heart of the machine. That is where I put all my BAT files on which my personal interface depends. One of the first ones that I write is one called SF.BAT. Typing "sf" gets me to that directory so I can add more .BAT files quickly. I do that whenever I need to have a program starter. For example running LYNX requires that DHCP gets started and stopped as well as just running the executable. Most are extremely simple with under 5 lines, but some are more complex, like the AE and CE (autoexec.bat edit, config.sys edit) commands which need to change attributes on the way in and on the way out, as well as rename and delete the backups and so on. I also add sounds to most of my bats so I can tell if they've started or completed. This allows me to not have to waste my eyes on looking on the screen all the time and makes it easy to concentrate on the real task at hand which is generally more mind oriented than a visual exercise. Anyway, this directory currently has about 80 commands but is always growing. The thing is that I've got a naming system and I write them myself so I am likely to remember. If I don't, the I just type "df" and have a look by subsequently typing "dm".

All programs go on the D: drive, and data and other projects go on other drives. However, on a small machine I would probably just use a D: drive. Here is mine:

Volume in drive D is ANA-D
Volume Serial Number is 5D9C-88AF
Directory of D:\

TEXT <DIR> 10-08-11 4:46a
LANG <DIR> 10-08-11 4:46a
COMP <DIR> 10-08-11 4:46a
INFO <DIR> 10-08-11 4:46a
PROG <DIR> 10-08-11 4:46a
SCRN <DIR> 10-08-11 4:46a
COMM <DIR> 10-08-11 4:46a
7 file(s) 0 bytes
378,052,608 bytes free
D:\ $


I won't bother with the tree for that since it is extensive and irrelevant. Needless to say both these drives have lots of stuff in them. It is just arranged in a neat and logical order. Partial CHKDSK output:

C:\
122,880 bytes in 15 directories
8,437,760 bytes in 361 user files

D:\
1,949,696 bytes in 236 directories
154,320,896 bytes in 2,568 user files


When all that is decided upon, then it is obvious that the path needs to be set only to a few directories on the system (C: ) drive. The other thing which needs to be set is the environment. That is when you need to think about your DOS configuration files. One trick is that you put environmental variables such as your prompt, substitutions (if any), and SET, at the end of your autoexec.bat after all the TSRs or whatever, so that they don't get loaded multiple times.

So, there's some of my philosophy on how to set up a DOS box. YMMV :)

SpidersWeb
April 10th, 2012, 09:47 PM
No driver is needed. To print text you just print to LPT1: which sends text direct to the port and the printer will know what to do.
For applications with graphics most will have an IBM Graphics Printer driver built in (almost all DOS apps with graphics should support that printer).

Your method of DOS installation sounds quite good.

On your Xebec card is a ROM, this contains the drive configuration and the boot facility for your IBM. Also on this ROM is a low level format utility but there isn't a 'Press F1' keystroke to get in - you have to use debug to execute code from a specific memory location (fun!). If I remember correctly you got your drive and controller as a working pair?? If so then it'll already be configured for your hard drive (NB: any configuration options will be jumper selectable depending on what revision card you have).

You should probably try and boot and just see what condition the hard drive is in - e.g. it might already be bootable.

You don't need anything in CONFIG.SYS or AUTOEXEC.BAT to boot. The files are optional. On my XT all I have is below, stuff in brackets isn't in the files of course.

CONFIG.SYS:
FILES=40

AUTOEXEC.BAT:
@ECHO OFF (dont repeat everything)
PROMPT $P$G ( C:\DOS> is nicer than C> )
PATH=C:\DOS (after install that is)
VER (print DOS version, its pretty)

You could also add a line for a clock card if you have one, or add "DATE" and "TIME" so you can set it each boot.

When you setup your network more lines will be added by the install program, but it sounds like you're going to need MS Lan Manager or MS Client - but I was unable to get either of these to work properly with Windows 7 shares. I also found that LanManager sucks way too much memory (at least in TCP/IP mode, didn't try NetBEUI). All reasons I just left the XT network free. Hopefully some others have better network advice :)

For my 286/386/486 machines I setup a Windows 2000 Server as a domain controller with WINS etc made things a lot easier.

To get data on/off my old girl, I use a null modem cable and FastLynx 2, but I have a pair of 20Mb drives in it, so I guess networking will be quite important for you with only 10.

Caluser2000
April 10th, 2012, 11:56 PM
You just need run a ftp server on the win7 box, packet driver and the dos ftp client and transfer files that way. "Home FTP Server" should do the trick. It's very simple to set up.

Ole Juul
April 11th, 2012, 12:09 AM
You just need run a ftp server on the win7 box, packet driver and the dos ftp client and transfer files that way. "Home PC Server" should do the trick. It's very simple to set up.

In general I would take that approach too, however I thought the 5161 took care of storage in this setup.

Caluser2000
April 11th, 2012, 12:12 AM
SpidersWeb mentioned others might have ideas on networking so I merely obliged.

modem7
April 11th, 2012, 01:41 AM
No driver is needed. To print text you just print to LPT1: which sends text direct to the port and the printer will know what to do.
For applications with graphics most will have an IBM Graphics Printer driver built in (almost all DOS apps with graphics should support that printer).

Expanding on that a little:

For your IBM 5152, the following will suffice as a simple test:

C:\>echo hello >lpt1
C:\>echo ^L >lpt1 (where the "^L" is a Ctrl-L key combination that generates a formfeed character)(must be an upper case L)

Expect the 5152 to print "hello".

Certain DOS programs, such as WordPerfect need to do 'fancy' things such as bold, underline, font selection, graphics. Those DOS programs use printer drivers, drivers that are unique to the program. So for example, the HP Laserjet III printer driver for WordPerfect 5.1 is the file C:\WP51\HPLASIII.PRS That driver file is only 'understood' by WordPerfect. Hardvard Graphics will have its own printer driver for the HP Laserjet III.

The IBM 5152 is a rebadged Epson MX-80, and so if you encounter a program that has printer drivers, but the IBM 5152 is not listed, then select 'Epson MX-80'.

mbbrutman
April 11th, 2012, 05:22 AM
<snip>

All reasons I just left the XT network free. Hopefully some others have better network advice :)

<snip>



For an XT? mTCP using the FTP client or FTP server. It's actually *designed* for this vintage of hardware, so it will run well.

If somebody needs a network drive letter then you have to go with an MS or Novell solution. But if you can accept doing "copies" over the network using FTP, then mTCP is the way to go.

(Yes, I'm tooting the horn here. But PCs, XTs, and Jrs are exactly what mTCP was designed for. And you can bet that if it runs fast on that hardware, it screams on newer hardware.)

Maverick1978
April 11th, 2012, 06:45 AM
Adding my $0.02 into the mix... I'm with Spidersweb - your autoexec.bat and config.sys will most likely be nearly empty on a PC/XT. On mine, I do load ansi.com (an ansi.sys derivative that takes up < 2k RAM vs the 4k RAM that ansi.sys takes). Mainly because I like to be able to change prompt colors sometimes when I get bored.

Also, Modem7's spot-on with the printer driver. With DOS, there's no such thing as a printer driver so far as the OS is concerned (that wasn't introduced until Windows). You don't even NEED a printer driver with your application software like 1-2-3, Word Perfect, or DBase... unless you want to take advantage of those programs' ability to mark up the text with bold, underline, italics, alternate fonts, etc. In that case, you would just go to the Printer setup within the program and select either the 5152 or MX-80 as your printer... done! (also for applications, as my needs weren't for huge databases, etc, I personally love Microsoft Works v1.05 or v3.00, as it has a nice pseudo-wysiwyg word processor, spreadsheet, and database functionality all in one system - and I never dealt with spreadsheets or databases that it couldn't handle, as I never used them in an enterprise environment. To me, 1-2-3 and D-Base were for enterprise environments... Works was more than adequate for small business and home environments)

Also, I like Mike's idea and implementation of using FTP for transferring files back and forth over the network, mainly as it saves you the headache of having to run an intermediary controller (CalUser2000) or worry about whether or not your Win7 machine can see your XT, or vice-versa. With FTP, you start the server on the fileshare machine, you start the client on the XT, and you go. The only thing to make sure of is that you have the proper holes punched in your firewalls to allow the server access through them.

bettablue
April 11th, 2012, 09:12 AM
Thanks for all of the info again everyone. I'll be reconnecting the printer to test out the command and let you all know what happened with the printer. As using the LAN adapter, FTP sounds like the best option for accessing the programs I have stored on my Windows 7 computer. With that, I may not need the Compaq I built a little while ago. All it's currently used for is to write floppy disks, so once the PC is connected to the network and can access the shared directories, I can use the IBM to write it's own floppy disks.

I'll be passing all of this on to my best friend who is helping me with this stage of the build. In fact he has helped configure all of the upgrades so far. We're actually going to try to have the system up and operating by Next week, so cross your fingers.

One more question though. I have an extra 384K memory board. Can I use that in the expansion unit to act as UMB and the Himem.sys? Or do I need to add more to the PC in order to access the additional memory? I was thinking that if I could load a few minor things like the LAN adapter driver, and the autoexec and config.sys in UMB, I could keep most of the primary memory free for programs. I think I'm getting way over my head on this one though, but I thought I would ask just in case.

For what it's worth, I love MS Works for DOS. I have a copy of it that I run occasionally for the word processor, but even it's spreadsheet is pretty amazing when you look at how much the program wants in system resources as compared to the Office products, or even MS Word alone; which I also have)

I've added some photos of the inside of the 5150 to my thread in the Collections forums. The final assembly took a bit of work, and it was quite painful because of the broken leg thing, buyt I was finally able to get the monitor out of the way, install the extender card, connect the expansion unit to the PC and put it all back togeether. I still have to wait for my wife to come home so I can get her to dig out mu surge protector. Right now I don't have enough places to plug in the entire system. And I found a major flaw in my setup. The power switch on the expansion unit is too low for me to reach easily. So, I may have to take the system completely down again, and stack the PC and the expansion unit. Too bad too; I like this setup, but it won't work when it's time to boot. More pics to come after I rework the setup again.

Stone
April 11th, 2012, 09:23 AM
IIRC, an Intel 8088 can not use UMB or himem.sys.

bettablue
April 11th, 2012, 09:33 AM
OK, I thought I saw something where someone had done that with an XT computer. But when I went back, he did start off by replacing the 8088 with a V20? or something like that. Then he had to swap out some other chips in the system. After reading the post, it looks like more of a PITA than it was worth.

Thanks stone for confirming that for me.

Caluser2000
April 11th, 2012, 04:42 PM
In case there any doughts I was refering to http://download.cnet.com/Home-Ftp-Server/3000-2160_4-10652632.html Works well on NT based machines and the mTCP FTP client accesses it without any dramas.

Maverick1978
April 11th, 2012, 05:15 PM
And I found a major flaw in my setup. The power switch on the expansion unit is too low for me to reach easily. So, I may have to take the system completely down again, and stack the PC and the expansion unit. Too bad too; I like this setup, but it won't work when it's time to boot. More pics to come after I rework the setup again.

Don't let that stop you. Remember the old "System Saver" pieces that RatShack sold back in the day that would allow you to selectively power off your monitor/printer/computer with its switch rather than with the computer switches? - Those babies were made to act as the "switch" for computer systems! Why not run something similar here with your UPS? Keep your 5151/5161 switches to "on," and use the UPS to power the systems off and on - with the front toggle switches that most UPS's have, you should be able to click it with your toe :) - and you can manually toggle the switches on the monitor and printer as needed if you don't want to keep them powered on all the time.

Anyone else know of any reason why this wouldn't be a good idea? (I know it was common back in the day, and I've never specifically read anything against doing such a thing w/ vintage electronics that are regularly used, but figured it would be worth gathering opinions)

SpidersWeb
April 11th, 2012, 05:28 PM
I can't see any actual problem doing that, you're just switching the mains voltage at a different location.
I'd probably just leave everything 'ON' and use the power switch at the wall.

I'd expect the 5161 will be ready before the 5150 tries to initialise it when powered up at the exact same time.

Ole Juul
April 11th, 2012, 05:41 PM
Anyone else know of any reason why this wouldn't be a good idea? (I know it was common back in the day, and I've never specifically read anything against doing such a thing w/ vintage electronics that are regularly used, but figured it would be worth gathering opinions)

Those are fine. There's lots of options and I know that BB would like a nice retro look. An aluminum box would look cool with some heavy duty toggle switches (http://www.ebay.ca/itm/DPDT-One-position-Toggle-Switch-On-Off-6P-15A125-10A250-/140287893288?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item20a9cf5f28) in a row with some nice big indicator lamps. This is not a big project and mostly just screws together, and it would look very "techie". The simplest would be to only have one switch for the unit which is hard to reach. However, power bars are an OK way to go too. :)

MikeS
April 11th, 2012, 06:23 PM
Those are fine. There's lots of options and I know that BB would like a nice retro look. An aluminum box would look cool with some heavy duty toggle switches[/URL] in a row with some nice big indicator lamps. Those power centers used to be really common and I'm surprised you don't see more of them these days of always-on printers etc. and our eco-guilt. Probably what Maverick is talking about above, a pizza box with a row of illuminated switches that usually sat (and still sits in my case) under the monitor, sometimes even with a swivel base built in.

bettablue
April 12th, 2012, 08:38 AM
Those power centers used to be really common and I'm surprised you don't see more of them these days of always-on printers etc. and our eco-guilt. Probably what Maverick is talking about above, a pizza box with a row of illuminated switches that usually sat (and still sits in my case) under the monitor, sometimes even with a swivel base built in.

OK, That sounds way too cool! I like all of the suggestions from Mav, ole and Mike. I think that out of all of these, I like Ole's idea the most, although a "pizza box" as Mike puts it sounds great too. Maybe a combination of the two. You're right, the wiring would be simple. Same for mounting switches. Lighted switches would be my choice, but with this particular desk, I think I would go for something that would either be just big enough to set the monitor on top of, or maybe a small "Project box" that would sit to the side of the monitor to the rear of the desk top. That would be good for either left or right handers.

All I know for sure is that with the main PC and the expansion unit stacked, the monitor is definitely too high. With a power switch setup like what we're talking about, there would be enough freedom to move BOTH to the bottom of the portable desk. Which would make it much more stable when moving around. There are definitely a lot more possibilities.

I need to start putting together a parts list.

I don't like the idea of using one of those power bars, but for now, I think that is going to be my best option. At least till I can put together something else.

Nice ideas my friends.

BTW Ole, you seem to know me a little too well. Why is that? LOL!

Maverick1978
April 12th, 2012, 08:55 AM
Those power centers used to be really common and I'm surprised you don't see more of them these days of always-on printers etc. and our eco-guilt. Probably what Maverick is talking about above, a pizza box with a row of illuminated switches that usually sat (and still sits in my case) under the monitor, sometimes even with a swivel base built in.

Exactly :) I never had one until about a year ago - found a NOS one in a Goodwill for a buck. It wasn't as "retro" as I would've liked, but it works great. (it has no green or orange power indicators, no toggle switches, just push white push switches in a white metal housing)

and Ole... those switches look cool. Has me idly wondering if it would be worth retrofitting mine! Laugh

MikeS
April 12th, 2012, 11:20 AM
Like this?
85128513

Or how about:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Radio-shack-power-switching-center-/270950819705?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3f15ed6779#ht_1194wt_700


...and Ole... those switches look cool. Has me idly wondering if it would be worth retrofitting mine! LaughThey look cool (definitely vintage) but don't order those particular ones; looks like they're momentary contact.

Maverick1978
April 12th, 2012, 12:13 PM
The one you linked is exactly like mine - except for the Radio Shack logo.

bettablue
April 12th, 2012, 12:35 PM
Like this?
85128513

Or how about:
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Radio-shack-power-switching-center-/270950819705?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3f15ed6779#ht_1194wt_700

They look cool (definitely vintage) but don't order those particular ones; looks like they're momentary contact.

Obviously if they're momentary they won't work, but if someone has one that will work, and are willing to sell, please; let's PM. I did message the seller of this particular one to see if it was still for sale. This would be perfect for my needs here with this setup.

Thanks.

bettablue
April 12th, 2012, 01:15 PM
Obviously if they're momentary they won't work, but if someone has one that will work, and are willing to sell, please; let's PM. I did message the seller of this particular one to see if it was still for sale. This would be perfect for my needs here with this setup.

Thanks.

OK guys. I'm in a bind. I just got in touch with the original seller. He just relisted the power switch center, but I can't buy it right now. But I'm still out on disability and will be for at least another month. Please PM me if we can work out something. If someone can buy it and hold it for me that would be fantastic.

SpidersWeb
April 12th, 2012, 01:33 PM
Those power boxes do look pretty awesome.

Have you started the machine up yet?

bettablue
April 12th, 2012, 01:41 PM
Those power boxes do look pretty awesome.

Have you started the machine up yet?

Naw. Not yet. I need to get things kind of figured out first. I had a very hard time moving things around yesterday, so I'm going to have to wait till I have me friend over on Tuesday to try booting the system. If the power switches were on the left side, I wouldn't have nearly as much trouble reaching them. But with my arm and legs the way they are, well, I only have the left arm that works the way it should.

Shadow Lord
April 12th, 2012, 08:33 PM
Don't let that stop you. Remember the old "System Saver" pieces that RatShack sold back in the day that would allow you to selectively power off your monitor/printer/computer with its switch rather than with the computer switches? - Those babies were made to act as the "switch" for computer systems! Why not run something similar here with your UPS? Keep your 5151/5161 switches to "on," and use the UPS to power the systems off and on - with the front toggle switches that most UPS's have, you should be able to click it with your toe :) - and you can manually toggle the switches on the monitor and printer as needed if you don't want to keep them powered on all the time.

Anyone else know of any reason why this wouldn't be a good idea? (I know it was common back in the day, and I've never specifically read anything against doing such a thing w/ vintage electronics that are regularly used, but figured it would be worth gathering opinions)

You don't want to do that w/ a UPS unless you want to seriously shorten the batter life.

SpidersWeb
April 12th, 2012, 08:52 PM
Naw. Not yet. I need to get things kind of figured out first. I had a very hard time moving things around yesterday, so I'm going to have to wait till I have me friend over on Tuesday to try booting the system. If the power switches were on the left side, I wouldn't have nearly as much trouble reaching them. But with my arm and legs the way they are, well, I only have the left arm that works the way it should.

Aww bugger :( that'd drive me nuts!

bettablue
April 13th, 2012, 09:59 AM
Aww bugger :( that'd drive me nuts!

Trust me. I know It's driving me crazy too. But I paid for it all day yesterday with pain. I'm going to try again today to setup the system the way I really want it. Then, I'll figure out what I want to do about the power issue. I'm pretty confident that I did everything right up to where I am. And, yes, there is still some work that needs to be done. But at the same time, I really don't want to kill myself over it. Basically, I'm the one armed man in a wheelchair, so you get the idea. Things just aren't that easy to do sometimes. This is definitely one of those times.

Maverick1978
April 13th, 2012, 01:07 PM
Betta, these are common devices. I'd suggest waiting. Besides, that white one that was relisted won't match the look of your PC anyways. I'd suggest this one (http://www.ebay.com/itm/PC-Concepts-Computer-Power-Controller-PC-006-Five-5-Port-Temporary-Power-Tap-/200740035755?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2ebd09dcab) or this one. (http://www.ebay.com/itm/COMPUTER-POWER-CONTROLLER-TL-777-/220999928508?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item33749f4abc) (I did a search for computer power center)

More vintage looking, and as I remember, the color scheme of the casing was made to match the look of the PCs. And, I can tell you, this one is much sturdier than the radio shack one like mine - I don't know that I'd trust a monitor sitting on mine, which is why it's not in use currently.

bettablue
April 13th, 2012, 01:21 PM
Cool I'll do that. I do sometimes, OK most of the time, jump too soon. You're right. The color scheme will look a lo better with the ones you linked. The funny thing is that I did use those same terms and got a completely different set or results. Then when I was logged in, I got another set that finally had one of the ones you linked.

Thanks again Mav.

I'll keep my eyes open.




Betta, these are common devices. I'd suggest waiting. Besides, that white one that was relisted won't match the look of your PC anyways. I'd suggest this one (http://www.ebay.com/itm/PC-Concepts-Computer-Power-Controller-PC-006-Five-5-Port-Temporary-Power-Tap-/200740035755?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2ebd09dcab) or this one. (http://www.ebay.com/itm/COMPUTER-POWER-CONTROLLER-TL-777-/220999928508?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item33749f4abc) (I did a search for computer power center)

More vintage looking, and as I remember, the color scheme of the casing was made to match the look of the PCs. And, I can tell you, this one is much sturdier than the radio shack one like mine - I don't know that I'd trust a monitor sitting on mine, which is why it's not in use currently.

bettablue
April 14th, 2012, 11:17 PM
Today, I got the wife involved with helping me reconfigure the system again. There really isn't anything different than I had it befor. The main PC and monitor are on the top of the portable desk, and the expansion unit along with the iOmega Zip drive and cassette recorder. The graphics printer are located on the bottom shelf along with the manuals.

I'll be booting the machine WITH the expansion unit installed later today. Wish me luck!

neutrino78x
April 15th, 2012, 12:17 PM
A lot of these games will not work with lesser versions of DOS, which is why I want to install the latest version of DOS possible.

I totally agree, I don't know why people want to run DOS 2.0 or something...you have 10 MB of disk space, that's plenty for any version of DOS. :)

Well, there's DR-DOS 7.03 (click for link) (http://drdos.com/products/dr-dos/), now owned by DeviceLogics, but this is an updated version of DR-DOS from the 80s. You buy it for $35. :-)

There's also IBM DOS 7.1, IBM doesn't sell a retail package of DOS anymore, but you can download 7.1 for free from their web site. Just go here (link) (http://www-947.ibm.com/support/entry/portal/docdisplay?lndocid=MIGR-53564), download the zip file, go into sgdeploy, then sgtk. The DOS directory is DOS 7.1. :) If I remember right, IBMDOS.SYS and IBMBIOS.SYS are the system files that have to be in the root directory of a floppy to make it bootable, well, them and COMMAND.COM too, of course. :)

Beyond those two there's FreeDOS (http://www.freedos.org) and OpenDOS (http://www.drdosprojects.de/). :)

I'm not sure what OS I would install if I got our 5150 out of storage...it is buried under my dad's stuff that he has in there...I think eventually I will buy an XT or PS/2 Model 30 off ebay. :) But, most likely I would try to get IBM DOS 2000 if it is still available on amazon when I get to that point, there are only like 2 copies on there. If not, I would probably buy a copy of DR-DOS and dual boot that and FreeDOS. :)

bettablue
April 15th, 2012, 04:21 PM
Those power boxes do look pretty awesome.

Have you started the machine up yet?

I just now booted up the old gal! Believe it or not, the computer booted to c:\ Don't you lust love it when things go as planned?
DOS is installed on the drive, but I don't have any idea what version is loaded. There were no device errors, or extra beeps, so DOS picked up the AST six-Pack card installed in the main PC too. So far, so good.

All I wanted to do is boot it up today to see if the expansion unit was doing it's job, and Wow! I'm surprised! Some of the configurations are already loaded. I am stoked!

SpidersWeb
April 15th, 2012, 05:07 PM
Awesome :D Congrats

Type VER and find out your DOS version. My XT came with 4.01 when it arrived and I ended up just leaving it because it wasn't worth changing (for me anyway).

bettablue
April 16th, 2012, 05:11 PM
Awesome :D Congrats

Type VER and find out your DOS version. My XT came with 4.01 when it arrived and I ended up just leaving it because it wasn't worth changing (for me anyway).

Good idea. DOS 3.30.

The best thing is that the extender and receiver cards I got from ole juul for the expansion unit work. We both had some trepidations about that. At least we don't have to worry about that any more. Boot time is just over a minute. There seems to be a lot of duplicate programs in a seperate DOS directory as well another directory called SYM which seems to belong to a program called Symphony.

The drive started out pretty noisy, bit it is really smoothing out as I let it run, which I think is a good sign. I want to upgrade to a higher version of DOS though; like 6 or 7. I have a question about something though. When I ran the directory I found some AST software, ASTCLOCK.EXE and SET CLOCK.EXE. Neither of these allow me to actually set the clock. When I run either of these, date and time all report all 9's.

So, I want to completely reformat the hard disk, reinstall DOS, and bring over all of the primary DOS commands I'll be using. What are your thoughts?

SpidersWeb
April 16th, 2012, 08:18 PM
That'll be all good, you can always try out different options to your hearts content too (as long as you have some way of making 360KB disks).
Not sure about the clock stuff, but there is a section dedicated to RTC drivers on the minuszerodegrees website which has AST tools in the list. Awesome site that.

On a few of my machines I've just given up caring about dates now lol Have two RTC units but they're obscure and wont work with anything I throw at them.

Enoy :)

bettablue
April 16th, 2012, 09:03 PM
That'll be all good, you can always try out different options to your hearts content too (as long as you have some way of making 360KB disks).
Not sure about the clock stuff, but there is a section dedicated to RTC drivers on the minuszerodegrees website which has AST tools in the list. Awesome site that.

On a few of my machines I've just given up caring about dates now lol Have two RTC units but they're obscure and wont work with anything I throw at them.

Enoy :)

Oh, I'm very familiar with modem 7's site. You're right, fantastic site for info.

Onto some other things though. I built up an old Compaq 5403 from 1998, and install Windows 98 on it. It has a 4 Gig hard drive 64 Megs of RAM, DVD burner, internal 100 Meg Zip drive, but most importantly, I swapped out the 3.5" 1.44 Meg floppy drive for a 5.25" 360 Kb DSDD drive. I built it for one purpose only, and that is to make 5.25" floppy disks for use in my IBM 5150. Once I can get the network configuration figured out and working, I'll add some additional hardware and make the Compaq a vintage gaming machine. For now though, it serves its purpose quite well.

I definitely want to upgrade DOS on the IBM. With version 3.3, there are a lot of games in my collection I can't play. At the bare minumum, those will require DOS 6.22, so I'm actually looking for a copy I can buy through E-Bay or something. At the same time, there are some files on the drive I want to keep. With the IBM able to read and write to both if it's floppy drives, there shouldn't be any problem there either.

I'll tell you this though. Being able to boot to the hard drive is a major improvement inn the system. I'm just curious as to why it worked when I didn't configure anything in the PC yet. Can it be the work that Chuck did on the controller when he sold it to me? (BTW Chuck, you are an amazing guy, thanks again...)

Ole Juul
April 16th, 2012, 09:18 PM
Good idea. DOS 3.30.

Good choice. MS-DOS 3.3 came out July 1987 so that is realistic for this machine. Also PC-DOS 3.3 came out April 2 1987 (with the PS/2 I think) and had 1.44 disk support and multiple partitions. Perhaps MS-DOS 3.30a from February '88 would be pushing it. But yes, in general, 3.3 rocks. :)

In my experience 3.2 is really irritating if you're writing batch files and there is generally no good reason to use it other than historical correctness in some cases. Although 3.0 and 3.1 came out in (Aug) '84 which is a good date for a PC, they were really meant to get up to speed with the AT. Really, if you want earlier than 3.3 then you might as well go with PC DOS 2.0 which came out March 8 of 1983 and is the historically appropriate upgrade for a PC. It is also probably just as functional as 3.2 would be on that machine.

SpidersWeb
April 16th, 2012, 09:49 PM
ehehe yeah if you keep any DOS version under '5' make sure to install a text editor



** edit - although I shouldn't be mean to EDLIN, after all I do use 'vi'

Ole Juul
April 16th, 2012, 10:35 PM
ehehe yeah if you keep any DOS version under '5' make sure to install a text editor

** edit - although I shouldn't be mean to EDLIN, after all I do use 'vi'
In fact always install a text editor first thing after an OS install. Any OS.

I only used EDLIN for a few months until I learnt that the vendor provided utilities were pants. Still, it is venerable, AND it can reportedly run from a script so you can automatically edit multiple files at once. Now that's not a trick that many newer editors can do. :)

Stone
April 17th, 2012, 04:54 AM
I definitely want to upgrade DOS on the IBM. With version 3.3, there are a lot of games in my collection I can't play. At the bare minumum, those will require DOS 6.22, so I'm actually looking for a copy I can buy through E-Bay or something.I don't see how any game that can be played on a true IBM PC could possibly require DOS 6.22. Any game that *might* require DOS 6.22 would be so painfully slow on that machine that you wouldn't even want to play it. I would say that 3.3 or 5.0 is plenty for that machine.

vwestlife
April 17th, 2012, 06:51 AM
I don't see how any game that can be played on a true IBM PC could possibly require DOS 6.22. Any game that *might* require DOS 6.22 would be so painfully slow on that machine that you wouldn't even want to play it. I would say that 3.3 or 5.0 is plenty for that machine.

AFAIK, except for the programs that came with MS-DOS 6.x itself, there are no DOS programs which require DOS 6.x. After all, the DOS built into Windows NT, XP, 7, etc. is the equivalent of MS-DOS 5.0, so any DOS program written in the past 15 years or so which is able to run in Windows can't require anything higher than 5.0.

Maverick1978
April 17th, 2012, 07:53 AM
I'm with Stone and vwestlife; any and every single game I ran across, even in the DOS 5.0/6.0 era, had DOS 3.3 as a minimum requirement. Now this didn't mean that one could run every single facet and option of the game(s) under DOS 3.3 as one could under, say, 6.0 - but the games would run. With minimum configuration (i.e. base graphics, only PC Speaker sounds, and probably requiring a clean boot to do so in strapped systems. And there was no chance that many of these would even approach playable on anything less than a higher-end 286)

Historically and realistically, the games that are going to run at their best on a 5150/5160 were released during the lifespan of those systems, and maybe up to and including the majority of the 5170 era, as game designers wouldn't have wanted to alienate people with older machines.

With that said, there are a number of games released during this era that are barely playable on a PC/XT - and they were intended for those machines! George Broussard's Arctic Adventure, published by Apogee, comes to mind here. It's a GREAT little platform game on a 286 and higher, but on an 8088 with the IBM CGA adapter, the screen refreshes between levels and the speed during the game makes it feel laggy; the game just crawls. I keep meaning to test it on my Model 25 with an 8mhz 8086 processor, and also in my XT with a NEC v20 replacing the 8088. I suspect that the game will run at perfectly acceptable levels on these systems.

Dave Farquhar
April 17th, 2012, 08:42 AM
On 8088 and 8086-based machines, there was no benefit to going beyond DOS 3.3. The two things that running DOS 5 or DOS 6 gained you were better memory management and better included utilities. The 8088 and 8086 couldn't benefit from the memory management, and the bigger footprint actually meant you had less available memory after the system was booted. And there are third-party utilities that run under DOS 3.3 that are nicer than what came with DOS 5/DOS 6 anyway.

I agree with the others that any software that requires DOS 5 or 6 is likely to be far too slow to be usable on an 8088. You'll be much happier running those titles on a 386.

Chuck(G)
April 17th, 2012, 08:54 AM
From my own personal recollections, DOS 3.2/3.3 was a big improvement over DOS 2.1--it added a fair amount of functionality to the system calls. The next version, 4.01 (4.0 was a disaster) was useful because it enabled larger hard disk partitions. 5.0 was the first retail version of MS-DOS and had some interesting utilities. And 6.22 was the last gasp of "regular DOS".

I have other oddball versions, such as 2.0, 3.0, etc.--but they all had "gotchas" that were remedied by subsequent interim upgrades, so they're only in my library for archival purposes.

I used 3.3 for a very long time. 4.01 almost not at all because I didn't trust it. I used 5.0 for quite a time, before buying 6.0 and then upgrading it to 6.22.

In my library of self-extracting boot disks on my XP machine, I have 6.22 and DOS 7 from Win95B to handle FAT32 volumes (I also load DOSLFN). That's pretty much it today--and I still use DOS quite a bit.

Ole Juul
April 17th, 2012, 03:28 PM
From my own personal recollections, DOS 3.2/3.3 was a big improvement over DOS 2.1--it added a fair amount of functionality to the system calls.

You would certainly know much better than I, but wouldn't the games that were written before 3.2/3.3 run perfectly well without the functionality that came in the years after? I'm assuming that any games that came out after, say '86, would be considered historically inappropriate for this machine, but perhaps I'm alone in this view.

Stone
April 17th, 2012, 03:46 PM
Not only would they be historically inappropriate but more importantly they would run so dog-slow (if they'd even run at all) that you might be tempted to toss the machine out the window. I mean let's face it... a PC didn't/doesn't do anything very fast.

bettablue
April 26th, 2012, 12:48 PM
I went back to review this thread because of some of the recommendations you have all made. Indeed, there are some things I wanted to run from DOS 6.22, that wouldn't run on version 3.3. When I attempt to run them after bringing them over through floppy, I get a meesage that this program cannot be run under this version of DOS. DOS 6.0 is required. This happened on several programs/commands I pulled from a DOS 6 directory.

I am also very curious about the possibility of using a DOS shell program. I asked about one a while back from Packard Bell titled 'DOS Manager' or something similar. I opted to not do that at the time because running from a floppy disk meant that for the most part, I would end up having to load at least 2 floppy diskettes before the computer was useable. However, now that the system is bootable from the hard disk, I have a lot more flexability. Windows 1.0 comes to mind too.

I don't need to run the shell during the every normal \statup , but I would like to access it to help organize my extensive list programs into catagories like Productivity, System Tools, and Games. Packard Bell's DOS Manager would allow the use of shortcuts to programs and folers, so that's one reason I like that shell program. Later, if I modify my config.sys and autoexec files, at leastI have options. Are there any other shell programs you would recommend, and why?

From what it looks like, this may be just one way to easilly access the thousands of programs I have. Keep in mind, I'm definitely NOT going to drag the entire collection over to my "D" drive. The PC and expansion don't have that much storage. All together, with the C and D drives, I'll only have a total of 40 Megs. However;if I can get everything set up properly, and I do mean everything including my LAN adapter and some sort of FTP program, I can access the shared folders on my Windows 7 computer; and get to my complete software library through the network. Now THAT would be AWESOME!!!

SpidersWeb
April 26th, 2012, 01:21 PM
Sounds like you have a DOS 6.0 folder and are using a DOS 6.22 boot disk?? Versions must match.

My favourite menu system, which I use on my 5160, is Direct Access 5.1. It's larger than most DOS menu's but it's very quick and easy to setup and looks nice.
If you're changing the installed programs all the time it might be a waste of disk space tho

Favourite file manager/tree navigator would have to be XTree Gold by a long shot.

There is a LOT you can do with XtreeGold, tonnes of functions, can take a while to learn your favourite keys but once you do you'll never be without it again.
Will do everything from recursive deleting (PRUNE) to moving sections of directory trees (GRAFT) to formatting disks to editing text files etc.
PM me if you need install disks. 6 x 360Kb but you can save heaps of space by not installing graphics file viewers etc etc.

p.s. Windows 1 was a wee bit poop, but it is fun to look at if you haven't used it before.

Stone
April 26th, 2012, 02:05 PM
I've got a very nice, boxed, Direct Access v5.0 if anybody's interested.

bettablue
April 28th, 2012, 04:20 PM
Thanks Ole.. I see that we both like to do things pretty much the same way.

I'll be doing pretty much the same thing. On my "C" drive, I'll have my BOOT plus directories for my DOS tools and TSRs etc. My "D" drive is where all the good stuff will reside; productivity apps, like word processing, spreadsheet, checkbooking, and a bunch of games.

The biggest concern I have right now is in setting up that Intel LAN adapter. I have posted pics of it here before, but this is the first time I'm including a pic of the modem. The thing is, the LAN adapter and modem are supposed to be real easy to find drivers and software for, yet, these two pieces are proving to be more trouble than anyone lets on. I have downloaded some packet drivers for what is supposed to be the 8/16 bit adapter, but when I go into the documentation, I find that it's for a completely different OS, or just not the correct hardware. I keep running into the same thing with the modem... Besides the new hard disk and a dual serial port card, these are the final pieces that need to be configured in the expansion unit. I have checked and so far, there arent any IRQ conflicts, so they should be quite simple to get working. Yet, I have had this LAN adapter for months and I still can't get it, or the modem working.

Alsso, one last item to mention. I want to get some recommendations on software to use the LAN adapter and modem with. I was thinking of using an FTP program with some sort of GUI to access programs and data on my primary computer. As far as the modem is concerned, I'll be using it to connect to BBS services, so whatever software you recommend would need to be somewhat user friendly.

Can someone please help me locate the correct drivers and software for these two pieces of hardware? I hope the pics help.







You're not talking about just writing the autoexec.bat and config.sys files are you? To my twisted thinking you first need to design a file structure using a logic that suits you. Then you can do the rest.

My preference is for clean and simple. YMMV My C:\ drive only has two directories and the autoexec.bat and config.sys files are hidden and read only. The directory looks like this:


Volume in drive C is ANA-C
Volume Serial Number is 5F9B-C40D
Directory of C:\

PATH EDC 7,866 04-05-12 12:14a
SYS <DIR> 10-08-11 4:38a
TMP <DIR> 10-08-11 4:38a
3 file(s) 7,866 bytes
525,672,448 bytes free
C:\ $


Of course that's a larger machine, but I use the same kind of structure on vintage stuff. The TMP is just that, but the SYS directory is all the system files. Here is the tree:

C:\ $tree
Directory PATH listing for Volume ANA-C
Volume Serial Number is 5F9B-C40D
C:.
----SYS
- ---- ANA
- - ----NOHD
- - ----ANATEMP
- ----0
- ----1
- ----2
- ----F
- ----MS
- - ----ARC
- ----CFG
- - ----BOOT
- - ----WATTCP
- - ----MTCP
----TMP


The directories named 0, 1, and 2, are all the utilities which are likely to be used on the system, or deemed to currently be useful. On an XT it is probably adequate to just use the SYS directory and skip the subs. On a true vintage machine running, say 2.1, I would include all the files in one /OS directory. The MS directory contains the MS-DOS 6.22 files which are to be in the path and the ARC subdirectory of that is all the other MS utilities and things which I don't want to see (which is most of it). The CFG directory is where I keep configurations such as the WATTCP and mTCP ones (with old ones and a bit of related stuff). The BOOT directory is where COMMAND.COM resides and several levels of autoexec.bat and config.sys are backed up. Every time I edit these files, they are automatically backed up so I can go back a couple of levels if I want. It's just easier (and more relaxing) that way.

Now, the one I haven't mentioned yet, is the C:\SYS\F directory. That is the heart of the machine. That is where I put all my BAT files on which my personal interface depends. One of the first ones that I write is one called SF.BAT. Typing "sf" gets me to that directory so I can add more .BAT files quickly. I do that whenever I need to have a program starter. For example running LYNX requires that DHCP gets started and stopped as well as just running the executable. Most are extremely simple with under 5 lines, but some are more complex, like the AE and CE (autoexec.bat edit, config.sys edit) commands which need to change attributes on the way in and on the way out, as well as rename and delete the backups and so on. I also add sounds to most of my bats so I can tell if they've started or completed. This allows me to not have to waste my eyes on looking on the screen all the time and makes it easy to concentrate on the real task at hand which is generally more mind oriented than a visual exercise. Anyway, this directory currently has about 80 commands but is always growing. The thing is that I've got a naming system and I write them myself so I am likely to remember. If I don't, the I just type "df" and have a look by subsequently typing "dm".

All programs go on the D: drive, and data and other projects go on other drives. However, on a small machine I would probably just use a D: drive. Here is mine:

Volume in drive D is ANA-D
Volume Serial Number is 5D9C-88AF
Directory of D:\

TEXT <DIR> 10-08-11 4:46a
LANG <DIR> 10-08-11 4:46a
COMP <DIR> 10-08-11 4:46a
INFO <DIR> 10-08-11 4:46a
PROG <DIR> 10-08-11 4:46a
SCRN <DIR> 10-08-11 4:46a
COMM <DIR> 10-08-11 4:46a
7 file(s) 0 bytes
378,052,608 bytes free
D:\ $


I won't bother with the tree for that since it is extensive and irrelevant. Needless to say both these drives have lots of stuff in them. It is just arranged in a neat and logical order. Partial CHKDSK output:

C:\
122,880 bytes in 15 directories
8,437,760 bytes in 361 user files

D:\
1,949,696 bytes in 236 directories
154,320,896 bytes in 2,568 user files


When all that is decided upon, then it is obvious that the path needs to be set only to a few directories on the system (C: ) drive. The other thing which needs to be set is the environment. That is when you need to think about your DOS configuration files. One trick is that you put environmental variables such as your prompt, substitutions (if any), and SET, at the end of your autoexec.bat after all the TSRs or whatever, so that they don't get loaded multiple times.

So, there's some of my philosophy on how to set up a DOS box. YMMV :)

Ole Juul
April 28th, 2012, 11:52 PM
The biggest concern I have right now is in setting up that Intel LAN adapter. I have posted pics of it here before, but this is the first time I'm including a pic of the modem. The thing is, the LAN adapter and modem are supposed to be real easy to find drivers and software for, yet, these two pieces are proving to be more trouble than anyone lets on. I have downloaded some packet drivers for what is supposed to be the 8/16 bit adapter, but when I go into the documentation, I find that it's for a completely different OS, or just not the correct hardware. I keep running into the same thing with the modem... Besides the new hard disk and a dual serial port card, these are the final pieces that need to be configured in the expansion unit. I have checked and so far, there arent any IRQ conflicts, so they should be quite simple to get working. Yet, I have had this LAN adapter for months and I still can't get it, or the modem working.

Also, one last item to mention. I want to get some recommendations on software to use the LAN adapter and modem with. I was thinking of using an FTP program with some sort of GUI to access programs and data on my primary computer. As far as the modem is concerned, I'll be using it to connect to BBS services, so whatever software you recommend would need to be somewhat user friendly.

Can someone please help me locate the correct drivers and software for these two pieces of hardware? I hope the pics help.

That's an odd NIC in my experience, but if people are recommending it and not posting the drivers then I'd say they're talking through their hats. It's just polite to post drivers when needed. IMO Yes, I've looked in my collection. :)

Software for networking. Use Wattcp or mTCP or both. You know where to find the latter, but for Wattcp, pull my string and I'll send you a collection.

Now for the modem. Driver? Driver? Modems do NOT need drivers. If your modem is not working then it is probably broken. Unless, of course there a conflict. To make sure, you are aware that DOS labels the first comport as "1" simply because it is the first, and irregardless of what you have set. That can screw you around. :) To avoid that problem, set your IRQs starting with "1". You probably have this, but the numbering goes like this:


COM ADDR IRQ
1 03F8 4
2 02F8 3
3 03E8 4
4 02E8 3


The addresses probably match, but watch the other stuff. A great program is LYNC, which is very small, but not period. It is great for testing though. For general testing there are two things you need to do. First check your IRQs. This is most easily done using debug.


debug
d 40:0
q

That will display a string with the ports written backwards. Like this:

0040:0000 F8 03 F8 02 E8 03 E8 02-

Explanation:
0040:0000 Location Address Byte and Offset
F8 03 inverted is COM1 03F8h
F8 02 inverted is COM2 02F8h
E8 03 inverted is COM3 03E8h
E8 02 inverted is COM4 02E8h

Now the other useful test for modems is to send it something. If you still aren't sure what port, just try them all. If you ask it to go off hook, then it will be obvious when you hit the right one. It will also show that the modem works. Type this:

echo ata >com1
Then try com2 etc. When you hit it, it will make a noise. :)

Like I say, modems don't use drivers. You talk directly to them. However, to talk to them and get results on the screen will require a comprog. Lync 3.2 is here (http://cgs.coalmont.net/lync32.zip) for you. For accurate vintage there are not a lot of choices for your machine. If you want exactly 1983, I've got SMODEM, 1RD, PCTALK, and KERMIT. Let me know.

Edit: I have the slightly newer Intel driver. I don't know if it's backward compatible. It is for the the PCLA82xxB and I also have the SOFTSET program that might work with that. If you can't get any older driver, give this a try. It's a 12K single executable called EPROPKT.COM.

One thing that I have found confusing about drivers is that they often come as a huge (HUGE!) collection of stuff that has no real world purpose for a DOS user, and you have to look through different directories to find the tiny file that is all you need.

bettablue
May 16th, 2012, 01:55 PM
What do y'all think about this one?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/datagard5000-dataguard-pc-power-center-distributor-pc-printer-monitor-switch-/230752651626?pt=PCA_UPS&hash=item35b9ee096a

It definitely looks like it has enough switching ability.

If you think this one will do the job properly, I'm planning on popping a bid on it tonight.


Betta, these are common devices. I'd suggest waiting. Besides, that white one that was relisted won't match the look of your PC anyways. I'd suggest this one (http://www.ebay.com/itm/PC-Concepts-Computer-Power-Controller-PC-006-Five-5-Port-Temporary-Power-Tap-/200740035755?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2ebd09dcab) or this one. (http://www.ebay.com/itm/COMPUTER-POWER-CONTROLLER-TL-777-/220999928508?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item33749f4abc) (I did a search for computer power center)

More vintage looking, and as I remember, the color scheme of the casing was made to match the look of the PCs. And, I can tell you, this one is much sturdier than the radio shack one like mine - I don't know that I'd trust a monitor sitting on mine, which is why it's not in use currently.

Stone
May 16th, 2012, 02:09 PM
It's only got four power outlets. Is that enough for you? The two Maverick linked had five. I know you've got printer, puter, monitor and expansion case. That's four. If you've got anything else there's no place for it.