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Jimmy
April 23rd, 2012, 05:24 PM
I purchased an IBM 5150 in original box with keyboard and CGA in original box, I checked the serial numbers. They arrived today by UPS.

Pictues attached.:(:(:(

8631863386348636:(:(:(

Andretti
April 23rd, 2012, 05:40 PM
Ouch, hurts looking at that. With the very high shipping rates and results like this it really puts fear into buying something like this on line.

mikey99
April 23rd, 2012, 05:41 PM
Wow...sorry to hear about that. Was the 5150 okay ?
Those 5150 boxes are pretty rugged.

The keyboard may be repairable, the 5153 looks pretty bad though.
You may find a non working 5153 with a good case that could be used to
repair yours. The important thing is to make sure the CRT tube wasnt damaged.
Also check the circuit boards in the monitor to make sure they aren't cracked.

Unknown_K
April 23rd, 2012, 05:49 PM
Was there major damage to the box?

DOS lives on!!
April 23rd, 2012, 05:49 PM
Oh No! Sorry to see your bad luck with UPS. I've never had a problem out of them.

Check to see that the 5150 is in working condition. And check with the seller to make sure that the damage wasn't done on his end.

SpidersWeb
April 23rd, 2012, 05:50 PM
Wow that's pretty horrible. I would have been livid.
What did they say??

So frustrating because even if you get money back it wont replace them :(

Jimmy
April 23rd, 2012, 05:56 PM
I think the keyboard is okay, I put the keys back on but have not tested it. The 5150 power up, but did not attach another monitor to it. I purchased it on eBay so I am not sure how to handle it. I contacted the seller, and UPS. The tube is intact I believe, did not handle it a lot of than to photo it.

Will take a better look after UPS looks at it, it had to be handled rough.

I have another CGA what I am sick about is it being in the orignal box.

Jimmy
April 23rd, 2012, 05:58 PM
The box does not show any damage and I met the local delivery guy at the curb and carried them to my garage. I have never had a problem with UPS either. I got what I thought was a real bargain considering all 3 items were original and in boxes.

jonnymacuser
April 23rd, 2012, 05:59 PM
That is just f-ing terrible!

The clock is ticking on your claim -- immediately open a case in eBay buyer protection (if you purchaed it there).

Send it back to the seller right away with tracking/signature, demand a full refund.


Don't worry there are more 5153's in the world!

Jimmy
April 23rd, 2012, 06:03 PM
I emailed the seller and contacted UPS, so I need to contact eBay also, or do I need to wait and see what UPS and the seller say.

I know there are more 5153's but finding one in a box is a chore and finding one in an original box that serial numbers match is really a chore.

SpidersWeb
April 23rd, 2012, 06:07 PM
Might be worth keeping anyway, then buy another 5153 (and you'll have a box for it).
Bit suspicious the box shows no damage :/

Jimmy
April 23rd, 2012, 07:02 PM
I had already made up my mind, the box is not going back. I doubt they will give me anything for the monitor anyway. They had to drop both boxes somehow, at least 12 of the keys were off the keyboard and it was in the box with the 5150.

marcoguy
April 23rd, 2012, 07:22 PM
OMG I almost bought that PC I'm glad I didn't! :nervous:

Caluser2000
April 23rd, 2012, 07:25 PM
Bit suspicious the box shows no damage :/I would be too. The damage could've been done years ago and the items placed in a good box and put in the back of the storeroom.

Tiberian Fiend
April 23rd, 2012, 09:25 PM
FedEx is the only shipper I really trust. My UPS guy drops things on the floor of his truck as soon as he pulls up. I know because I could hear a loud "thunk" as he was unloading my Deskpro 286.

Le_Bear
April 23rd, 2012, 10:21 PM
If there's no damage to the box it must have been packaged that way? (as long as that's the original shipping container)

Malc
April 24th, 2012, 12:23 AM
Sorry to see that, a real shame, reminds me of the time i won a 5153 on ebay and it was delivered by DHL, The box was in good shape no damage but when i opened it and removed the monitor to my horror there was broken plastic casing and bits rattling around inside the monitor, The neck of the tube was broken clean off and bits and pieces every where, Totally destroyed, All i could think of is that the box had been dropped from a considerable height and landed flat on it's bottom destroying the monitor inside but resulting in no damage to the box. Good luck with your claim.

Malc

Le_Bear
April 24th, 2012, 01:14 AM
It is the sellers responsibility to package the shipment in a way that will carry the item safely to its destination. It is the shippers responsibility to carry it safely there. You are in no way obligated to accept damaged merchandise. The damages were done by either the seller, prior to shipping, or the shipper, during shipping, and at this point it is actually between them to decide which is at fault. I admire your ability to pity the poor recipient of this monstrous blunder, wherever it might have occurred, but you are not responsible for it. If you do accept it as is, I hope the winds of good fortune will bring you better days

Jimmy
April 24th, 2012, 06:17 AM
I want to thank everyone for the advice, this is my first time receiving anything that is damaged and I really did not know who to proceed. The monitor was packaged in the original box with the stryoform inserts that came with the origianal monitor. I know the plastic outside case of the monitor gets brittle with age and being under lights. The keyboard was packed with the 5150 in a seperate box had numberous keys were jarred off. I believe somewhere along the way, somebody just rough handled the boxes like throwing them flat on the floor. The outside shows not damage but just jarred hard on the inside.

I have notified UPS and the seller, as all of your realize just getting all or some of your all money back is really not the issue, another one of the old items is gone forever.

Erik
April 24th, 2012, 07:11 AM
UPS wears brown for a reason. The only time I ever ship with them is if the USPS is the only other alternative.

Maverick1978
April 24th, 2012, 09:58 AM
Hopefully you've also opened the case with eBay as well. Having worked in shipping depots loading trucks, unloading trucks, and moving freight to be loaded into trucks, I can tell you that many are NOT careful with their charges, regardless of who or what agency you ship with. That said, the horror stories I've heard most, and most often from the employees themselves, are from UPS. I do not ship with them.

I've had great luck with Fedex and USPS. I actually prefer the latter. Typically, I make my special packaging demands prior to paying for my auction, and in most cases, the sellers have had no problem with accomodating me. I tend to package stuff well beyond what's actually necessary to survive transit, as I know at some point, the package I'm shipping will be dropped, kicked, and mishandled. I don't expect a seller I'm purchasing from to do that, but I make no bones about demanding extra bubble wrap, foam inserts, cardboard backing, double-boxing, etc - though I always make sure that they know I'm willing to pay for that extra care as well, and in some extreme cases, I've been known to ship them the packaging and protections that I want used to have my item shipped with (that with my NEC Multisync purchased last year for $19.95 plus $60 coast-to-coast shipping.. .was worth the extra $12 and an hour's time to me to ensure that it would arrive to me in the condition that it was photographed in, and I think the seller was glad that he didn't have to scrounge up packaging)

Good luck with your claims... and if you're looking for new casing for your 5153, message Stone - I believe he has dead tubes in good cases. Perhaps you'll be able to save the back panel that has the serial number on it when you rebuild your monitor.

keropi
April 24th, 2012, 10:11 AM
This is a terrible sight indeed!

I have received stuff in condition like this in my business : boxes seem fine and inside was a mess , speaking of brand new electrical equipment.
All it takes is for a box to drop flat from some height, fragile plastics (like the aged IBM ones in this case) just can't absorb the shock I guess... I hope you work things out on this

Shadow Lord
April 24th, 2012, 10:21 AM
FedEx is the only shipper I really trust. My UPS guy drops things on the floor of his truck as soon as he pulls up. I know because I could hear a loud "thunk" as he was unloading my Deskpro 286.

FedEx guy dropped my 5162.... None of them can be trusted universally. Some are good in one area and crap in another.

Shadow Lord
April 24th, 2012, 10:36 AM
I've had great luck with Fedex and USPS. I actually prefer the latter. Typically, I make my special packaging demands prior to paying for my auction, and in most cases, the sellers have had no problem with accomodating me. I tend to package stuff well beyond what's actually necessary to survive transit, as I know at some point, the package I'm shipping will be dropped, kicked, and mishandled. I don't expect a seller I'm purchasing from to do that, but I make no bones about demanding extra bubble wrap, foam inserts, cardboard backing, double-boxing, etc - though I always make sure that they know I'm willing to pay for that extra care as well, and in some extreme cases, I've been known to ship them the packaging and protections that I want used to have my item shipped with (that with my NEC Multisync purchased last year for $19.95 plus $60 coast-to-coast shipping.. .was worth the extra $12 and an hour's time to me to ensure that it would arrive to me in the condition that it was photographed in, and I think the seller was glad that he didn't have to scrounge up packaging)

I am with Maverick. I always specify what kind of packaging I want, and for expensive delicate stuff I always check on my packaging requests BEFORE bidding on an item. I know I have passed on items because seller's refuse to double box and have paid extra for seller's to ship packed well. My pet peeve are sellers who charge and arm and a leg and then ship BRAND NEW UNOPENED vintage HW in store display boxes.

The other one I like is the term "As-Is". I am not sure why seller's think that covers them from anything. "As-Is" simply means the buyer will get it it in the same condition that the seller has the item in now. I.e. if 30 years ago you put it in storage in working condition then the customer will get it "as-is" the same working condition when it arrives. The fact that the seller was too lazy or unwilling to test the equipment offers them no legal coverage what so ever. In fact by not testing it you are implying the item is working. Now of course if the seller says 5153 w/ broken case being sold as-is then you don't have a claim, but most seller's do their darnedest to give you the impression the item is in perfect working order but stick an as-is so they don't have to take a return.

If you want to keep the item there really isn't anything they are going to do for you unless they want to be nice and give you a partial refund.. If you are willing to return it then you can get a full refund. In a case like this I would insist on return shipping being covered by the seller and he can get the money from UPS (BTW: you have no claim at UPS what so ever. Only the original shipper can take up the case with the shipping company - USPS is an exception to this).

Stone
April 24th, 2012, 10:52 AM
The other one I like is the term "As-Is".'As-Is' means it does not work. If you think it means anything else you're better off buying a lottery ticket. BTW, the Lottery is nothing more than a game for people who are terribly bad at math.

Shadow Lord
April 24th, 2012, 10:57 AM
'As-Is' means it does not work. If you think it means anything else you're better off buying a lottery ticket. BTW, the Lottery is nothing more than a game for people who are terribly bad at math.

Good luck with that in court. "As-Is" is exactly what it says. If you imply it works and sell it "as-is" then it means it works. If you say it does not work and sell it "as-is" then it means it doesn't work. Yes, in eBay speak as-is is code for "this is junk but I am hoping someone won't realize it and bid huge amounts of money." But eBay sellers, generally live in their own world right up with guys who want you to make them a blind offer on items they are selling.

NeXT
April 24th, 2012, 11:11 AM
I gave up on UPS after the brokerage fees hurt and then they nearly bankrupted me when they delivered a package when I was not there, noted that I was not home, and instead of trying the next day they shipped it back and flipped me the bill for return shipping AND the brokerage fees.

Stone
April 24th, 2012, 11:25 AM
Yes, in eBay speak as-is is code for "this is junk but I am hoping someone won't realize it and bid huge amounts of money." We were speaking eBay, weren't we? :-)

gerrydoire
April 24th, 2012, 11:27 AM
I had a Tandy 1000 with monitor arrive the same condition, got my money back though, but still a nice computer destroyed for nothing.

Stone
April 24th, 2012, 11:56 AM
The other one I like is the term "As-Is". I am not sure why seller's think that covers them from anything. "As-Is" simply means the buyer will get it it in the same condition that the seller has the item in now. I.e. if 30 years ago you put it in storage in working condition then the customer will get it "as-is" the same working condition when it arrives. The fact that the seller was too lazy or unwilling to test the equipment offers them no legal coverage what so ever. In fact by not testing it you are implying the item is working.I couldn't agree with you less and I am quite positive that you'd have absolutely no legal recourse here.

http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/as+is

http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/as-is.html

Once again, I'd say your chances would be better if you were to play the Lottery. YMMV :-)

Shadow Lord
April 24th, 2012, 12:02 PM
We were speaking eBay, weren't we? :-)

We are speaking eBay but as-is doesn't even hold true in eBay (i.e. just because you sold it as-is doesn't mean you are not issuing a refund). It just makes a seller think they can screw over the buyer by pulling a fast one. ;)

Shadow Lord
April 24th, 2012, 12:18 PM
I couldn't agree with you less and I am quite positive that you'd have absolutely no legal recourse here.

http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/as+is

http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/as-is.html

Once again, I'd say your chances would be better if you were to play the Lottery. YMMV :-)

I am not sure why you think anything in those links gives credence to what you said. They say the same thing as I've been saying. As-is means just that: as-is. The term originated, obviously, in face to face transactions in which the buyer has a chance to inspect goods to their satisfaction (i.e. I plan to sell my car to you as-is, you take it to your mechanic, he tells you all is kosher we conclude the transaction, the car breaks apart as you drive out of my driveway. Too bad for you). In an online transaction the buyer has no opportunity to inspect the goods until it arrives. Since buyer was not given sufficient chance to inspect goods as-is does not apply. At best as-is in an online transaction applies to the seller's disclosures (i.e. "has a broken CRT tube but otherwise excellent for age").

If you really want to sell w/o buyer recourse you need a good/strongly worded disclaimer: e.g. "I am selling you my 30 y.o. junk. I know it doesn't work. It didn't work then and it didn't get magically fixed sitting in my wet, moldy basement. I am not going to bother packing it so it won't break in shipping because it is already broken." Of course a disclaimer like that won't bring in the big bids but YMMV. :D

Stone
April 24th, 2012, 01:22 PM
You have a tendency to read-in phrases that aren't/weren't in the references we just discussed. This one ...'Since buyer was not given sufficient chance to inspect goods as-is does not apply.' is your opinion.

I see this as the conclusive point and that is something that I read, not read-in, or an opinion I hold.... 'As is' translates into 'with all faults (http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/fault.html).'

Or this... 'The term as is gives notice to buyers that they are taking a risk on the quality of the goods.'

Jimmy
April 24th, 2012, 01:29 PM
Again as always here, I learn everytime I ask a question. Thanks for all the info about how to make sure things are probably packaged for shipment. If I had asked before hand I probably could have saved this monitor.

Thanks again to everyone for responding and for all the great information

barythrin
April 24th, 2012, 02:04 PM
As is just means the seller waives any responsibility regarding the functionality of the item. You won't get your money back if it doesn't work. But yes they would still be responsible for sending an item that's in the condition that they specified. In your case it might be difficult to determine in which place the damage occurred which is why you report it to all the folks in the transaction. Yes, us pessimistic folks consider as-is likely meaning the seller tried it and it didn't work so they're pretending they didn't try it and selling it untested. I suspect many stores do the same thing (illegally or immorally) selling used items as untested/as-is when they tested the object and know it doesn't work. I caught one store putting a drive bay I had returned and it was defective back on the shelf because I marked it on one of the proms just for shiggles. Sure enough, it magically showed up on the stock shelf. Of course that was a local computer shop and that's just the way the owner made money off folks who didn't know better.

Le_Bear
April 24th, 2012, 05:58 PM
I believe you would win the lottery ten times, before you will find a box(any box) to fall FLAT. And after you win that lottery the first 9 times, try it with a box of feathers, and see if that box dropped flat has no noticeable scuffs. Now, add a 20-30 pound monitor (the kind with a picture tube in it, a picture tube with a screen end heavier than the tail ), now drop it, if you can, flat. If this could possibly happen, so smoothly that it did not scuff the box, but still destroyed the monitor, how could it be that the packaging materials inside the box were not also broken in some noticeable way ? That styrofoam carries loads well but in case of impact it breaks or gets crushed. Is there any visible damage to anything other than the damaged goods?

gerrydoire
April 24th, 2012, 06:40 PM
I'm always "anal" when buying off of ebay, expressing great concern on how the item is to be packaged, after a few run ins with morons who don't have a clue how to package stuff properly..

Jimmy
April 24th, 2012, 06:54 PM
Here are the some pics of each side of the monitor box as you can see theres is really no sign of damage.

8647864886498650

Jimmy
April 24th, 2012, 06:59 PM
Here are some pics of the monitor in the box. Notice the styrofoam is still intact, but notice the damage to the side of the monitor.

865186528653

Jimmy
April 24th, 2012, 07:02 PM
Here is the damage to the monitor. Again notice the styrofoam in intact.

86548655

twolazy
April 24th, 2012, 08:40 PM
More I look at it I come to a different conclusion...

I bet it was new when put away. But it sat in a hot/cold/dry warehouse for years and years. Once it started shipping we all know UPS isnt very kind. Even small drops, or EVEN a sound frequency like a turbine could have caused the brittle casing to crack/shatter, not to mention air pressure. Or other boxes being dropped on top over the years while being stored. Things just get brittle with ages sometimes, it happens... Shame too. If it had been packed with paper probably never have happened :(

Reason I Think this, look at the box. It's just like a speaker! Any low noise would resonate in there. Now think of something brittle, say think plastic or thick ice. About same tensile strength. Add bass, watch the ice shatter.

Le_Bear
April 24th, 2012, 09:00 PM
i'm simply saying, i do not believe the damage was done in transit. If you reported this immediately to the carrier, they should be good enough to deal with the shipper.

Shadow Lord
April 24th, 2012, 11:31 PM
You have a tendency to read-in phrases that aren't/weren't in the references we just discussed. This one ...'Since buyer was not given sufficient chance to inspect goods as-is does not apply.' is your opinion.

I see this as the conclusive point and that is something that I read, not read-in, or an opinion I hold.... 'As is' translates into 'with all faults (http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/fault.html).'

Or this... 'The term as is gives notice to buyers that they are taking a risk on the quality of the goods.'

Hmm... Then I gues I must have imagined reading this: "However, the buyer must have had the right to reasonable inspection, so that he/she has a chance to find any obvious deficiency." I could have sworn the pixels on my monitor formed those words in your referenced link but hey I am imagining things.

Lets put it another way: Jimmy bought a non-cracked monitor "As-Is". Item arrived packed well (original IBM box w/ original foam) and box is undamaged. The monitor has a huge crack in it - whose loss is it?

Shadow Lord
April 24th, 2012, 11:38 PM
As is just means the seller waives any responsibility regarding the functionality of the item. You won't get your money back if it doesn't work. But yes they would still be responsible for sending an item that's in the condition that they specified. In your case it might be difficult to determine in which place the damage occurred which is why you report it to all the folks in the transaction. Yes, us pessimistic folks consider as-is likely meaning the seller tried it and it didn't work so they're pretending they didn't try it and selling it untested. I suspect many stores do the same thing (illegally or immorally) selling used items as untested/as-is when they tested the object and know it doesn't work. I caught one store putting a drive bay I had returned and it was defective back on the shelf because I marked it on one of the proms just for shiggles. Sure enough, it magically showed up on the stock shelf. Of course that was a local computer shop and that's just the way the owner made money off folks who didn't know better.

But even here as-is doesn't protect the seller because all sorts of nasties like fraud, intent to defraud, larceny, etc. start kicking in. Of course as with all thing proving it in court is a whole different matter, but to think "as-is" auto-protects the seller is a pipe dream. I never sell anything as-is. Everything has a clear description of problems, issues, working status and comes with a 7 day satisfaction guarantee. Of course there is a minimum 30% re-stocking fee, item needs to be returned insured and registered in original packaging, and original shipping is not refundable. These terms are good for the CCs (in case of a charge back) and used to be good on eBay (i.e. if a buyer complained I just told them they can return it w/ our 7 day satisfaction guarantee) although I have not had a chance to test it recently in eBay.

Shadow Lord
April 24th, 2012, 11:45 PM
Jimmy,

Sorry man, but shit breaks. I just got a monitor delivered to me double boxed with styrofoam packing nice and tight so that it couldn't move. No visible damage to the box either, however, the monitor casing has come apart on the side. i know its not the seller because I've worked with him many times and I trust him. It happens and its not your fault. You contacted the seller. wait and see if you two can work it out. If not kick it up to eBay and from there to your CC if you get no satisfaction. But like I said you have to be willing to return the broken monitor...

Jimmy
April 25th, 2012, 05:02 AM
I agree and it's not a lot of money, if UPS or the seller either one say "tough luck". I filed a claim online with UPS and they emailed me that someone would come by and look at the damage. The seller called me, after I notified them of the damage, they called UPS directly. I am like Two Lazy, I think I had found a system that was packed up when it was fairly new and forgotten about. I mean it's just not that this monitor and system was still in the original box, it is really clean or was anyway.

I repaired the keyboard and the 5150 booted up with not problem.

And thanks to the people on here with experience shipping vintage items, I know in the future how to make sure an items is packed and shipped properly.

mikey99
April 25th, 2012, 06:36 AM
Glad to hear the keyboard was repairable and the system unit is working okay :-)

Looking at the pictures of the 5153....I suspect that the box was dropped from
some height with the CRT face up, and the weight of the CRT ripped the corner
mounting out of the bezel, and cracked the case.....

Maverick1978
April 25th, 2012, 10:14 AM
Any way that it happened, it happened. Regardless of who would legally be responsible in a court of law, it happened, and the seller might be honest enough to work with him in making it right. In that case... my rule of thumb, meet me halfway. Total cost / 3 = cost per item. One is obviously screwed... if it powers on and works, and is just the case... meet me halfway - or more - on the cost of that item. I keep the item, you get good feedback, we both learn a lesson. If the seller wants to make better on it than that, his choice... if the seller wants to do nothing, also his choice - and I'd follow through with my choices, which include negative feedback, ebay buyer protection, chargeback on credit card, etc.

Shadow Lord
April 25th, 2012, 10:44 AM
Any way that it happened, it happened. Regardless of who would legally be responsible in a court of law, it happened, and the seller might be honest enough to work with him in making it right. In that case... my rule of thumb, meet me halfway. Total cost / 3 = cost per item. One is obviously screwed... if it powers on and works, and is just the case... meet me halfway - or more - on the cost of that item. I keep the item, you get good feedback, we both learn a lesson. If the seller wants to make better on it than that, his choice... if the seller wants to do nothing, also his choice - and I'd follow through with my choices, which include negative feedback, ebay buyer protection, chargeback on credit card, etc.

MOST seller's are very cool and will work with you. Specially if you are being reasonable. In my experience the ones that don't are the ones that set out to screw you from the beginning (shipped w/o protection/proper packing, don't respond to questions, tell you to deal with the courier, you get the idea). But no matter what agreement you reach always message through eBay ONLY and insist on returning payment in the form it was sent (usually PayPal). I've heard enough horror stories and read enough "advice" given by sellers to other sellers to be wary of anything else. Say what you will about PayPal and eBay (and there is plenty of crap that can be said about both) they still have the best system out there. Amazon, the small sites, yahoo, etc. aren't even close.

mcsew2k
April 26th, 2012, 10:35 PM
... the weight of the CRT ripped the corner
mounting out of the bezel, and cracked the case.....

That is what happened to my PCjr monitor. Box looked OK, tube was still attached to broken pieces of the front bezel. Is it because they are old and the plastic case is more brittle?

barythrin
April 27th, 2012, 01:10 PM
In that last circumstance I think dropping the box but it landing flat could easily break a tube but not the box. It does always make me wonder though how these things ship from the factory to stores and seemingly arrive ok unless it's just the carrier.

njroadfan
April 27th, 2012, 02:14 PM
In that last circumstance I think dropping the box but it landing flat could easily break a tube but not the box. It does always make me wonder though how these things ship from the factory to stores and seemingly arrive ok unless it's just the carrier.

They are usually stacked and strapped down to a wooden pallet for delivery. Pallets are loaded and transported mostly via forklift, so the product likely doesn't see much shock when shipped from the factory to a distributor.

Shadow Lord
April 27th, 2012, 02:18 PM
They are usually stacked and strapped down to a wooden pallet for delivery. Pallets are loaded and transported mostly via forklift, so the product likely doesn't see much shock when shipped from the factory to a distributor.

And even if it does you and i don't hear about it. It gets sent back to the factory as damaged where its is repaired and sent out again to the distributor.

Jorg
April 27th, 2012, 11:46 PM
Here are the some pics of each side of the monitor box as you can see theres is really no sign of damage.


Ok, some word to this:
Please keep in mind that you are looking at a 30 year old plastic monitor casing (I'd expect ABS).
This material does age and the impact- and or stress/strain properties of the material are the first to suffer from that
It might just be that temperature differences and strain on the case, even when packaged correctly, might have caused this too.

bettablue
May 24th, 2012, 05:14 PM
I take this thread to heart because I work for UPS in the technical support department. It is pretty rare that I hear of this kind of damage. I do hear of more monitors being broken than anything else though but that's not just with UPS. It seems to be about even between the big 3 in the shipping world. That is one reasonthat when I bought my system,I had my brother in law make the purchase for me. and hold on to it until my wife want to see him on a sheduled visit.

That was/is the very same system I have now and been upgrading over the last year. It is also the exact setup that was so badly damaged here. In the end, although I had to wait an extra two months in order to actually get my hands on my PC, I think it was well worth the wait. At least I knew my system wasn't being abused, or trashed during transport. I think I would have been devistated if that was the very first vintage PC I had purchased and it had that kind of damage. I would probably have given up right then.

I know this was a while ago, so how have things gone with E-Bay, UPS and the seller?