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View Full Version : The new record price of fuel.



CP/M User
April 26th, 2006, 01:47 PM
Oh that's it!! A buck fourty five for a litre of fuel - they
have got to be kidding me. I'm sincerely on the verge of
leaving the car at home & walking 40k each day.

This is got to be the greatest crime of the century - clear
cut fraud which has the Governments backing!

When on earth will these alternatives fuels be available Mr.
Honnerable PM?

CP/M User.

USSEnterprise
April 26th, 2006, 02:29 PM
Prices dropped $.02 per gallon where I am :p

dpatten
April 27th, 2006, 06:00 AM
If you adjust for inflation to 2006 dollars, the 1979 gas crunch, had oil at ~100 barrel and regular unleaded at close to $4.50 per US gallon. In fact Gasoline costs roughly the same now as it did historically from 1919-1940 and 1975-1980. Thinking fondly of .35 cents a gallon gas in the 1960's? That turns out to be over $2 a gallon when adjusted for inflation. The good old days weren't as rosy as we remember them.

Interesting chart here.

http://www1.eere.energy.gov/vehiclesandfuels/facts/2005/fcvt_fotw364.html

Unknown_K
April 27th, 2006, 02:28 PM
Nice chart, I wish they had one to show how Americans buying power has steadily dropped since the 1970's and how since the 1990's people have had to drive further and further away from home to get to work.

We went from a one person bread winner in the family who could save money and still buy a home and had no debt (outside of the house) to a two person working family with no savings and quite a bit of high interest credit card debt one paycheck away from losing their house.

Also is there a chart showing how Bill Gates compares to the robber barons of the late 1800's and the early 1900's with respect to wealth and power?

CP/M User
April 27th, 2006, 03:48 PM
dpatten wrote:

> If you adjust for inflation to 2006 dollars, the 1979
> gas crunch, had oil at ~100 barrel and regular
> unleaded at close to $4.50 per US gallon. In fact
> Gasoline costs roughly the same now as it did
> historically from 1919-1940 and 1975-1980. Thinking
> fondly of .35 cents a gallon gas in the 1960's? That
> turns out to be over $2 a gallon when adjusted for
> inflation. The good old days weren't as rosy as we
> remember them.

Well, if I only knew the price of a barrel of oil back in 1996
was going to this high, I should have brought 10 drums back
then, instead of buying Video games for my computer! The price
of fuel back then was around 60-80c and the price of a barrel
of oil was say $20. Now the price for a barrel of oil is over
$70 & fuel is $1.45 per litre at the pump - only last year
prices were under $1 (though for most of the year - prices
were above that) & now it's almost .50c more than what it was
12 months ago.

CP/M User.

Starshadow
April 27th, 2006, 07:59 PM
gas Prices are getting crazy. It cost almost $30 to fill up a Scion xB! Thats a 1.5 litre 4 cylinder with a 10 gallon tank! I don't see how people can still afford to fill up a Yukon , Expedition, etc.

Vlad
April 27th, 2006, 08:05 PM
Around here, It takes $40 to fill up my Crown Vic. Its a 4.6 V8 with a 20 Gallon tank.....

-VK

USSEnterprise
April 27th, 2006, 10:52 PM
\Our 4Runner gets about 16 mpg, 16 Gallon Tank, V6. $50 to fill
Nissan Maxima gets 30 MPG but needs premium. $56 to fill its 18 gallon tank
We have an old 62 Buick in the garage. Thankfully it doesn't run. Needs premium, gets about 10 MPG, 20 gallon tank, needs premium + octane booster, $70 to fill

CP/M User
April 27th, 2006, 11:00 PM
I tend to pay between $50-$60 AUD on a 50 Litre tank, which
varies depending on how shoddy the pump is (in which I try to
avoid certain outlets). I only put $50 in it the other week at
$1.40 & it was just over 75% full - so I figure at that this
price it could be just over $60 to fill the whole tank.

Fortunately, I'm doing more car pooling at the moment -
sharning the cars around on each of the days we go to school,
so we're all saving quite a bit out of our pockets - which is
good! :-)

CP/M User.

dpatten
April 28th, 2006, 02:38 PM
it costs me almost $90 to fill up my full-size chevy truck if i let the needle get all the way down.

Terry Yager
April 28th, 2006, 02:56 PM
it costs me almost $90 to fill up my full-size chevy truck if i let the needle get all the way down.

Wow! And you're getting what...around 17MPG?

--T

alexkerhead
April 28th, 2006, 07:59 PM
If he drives like a granny, maybe.

Terry Yager
April 28th, 2006, 09:20 PM
Hey, I drive like my granny!

--T

dpatten
April 29th, 2006, 03:37 PM
Wow! And you're getting what...around 17MPG?

--T

Try 13... downhill, with a tailwind.

I drive the wife's Neon most days.

NathanAllan
April 30th, 2006, 11:13 AM
I was listening to Tom Martino while I was working the other day and there wa a guy on talking about a type of engine (not piston based) that uses compressed, heated air and gets three times the mileage as a piston engine. I was working at the time so I couldn't stop and write anything down. I looked it up (tried to at least) and found the Stirling, but that seems to be a different thing. Did anyone else hear it? Tom Martino's website is here:

www.troubleshooter.com

I'm going to email him and see if he or his office will reply.

/edit Does anyone else know of this (not the stirling) or heard the show?

Terry Yager
April 30th, 2006, 11:24 AM
All internal-combustion engines as we know 'em, use heated comperssed air, whether it be gas, diesel or JP-5-powered, piston, rotary or jet. You'll have to be more specific...

--T

dreddnott
April 30th, 2006, 10:04 PM
I drive a diesel GMC Suburban from 1985 - the biggest, toughest, sturdiest SUV ever made. With a 40-gallon tank and diesel approaching $3.50, it takes $140 to fill it up. My commute is 22 miles each way, putting me at just under 3 gallons per day.

My three high-mileage subcompact commuter cars (VW Cabriolet, Geo Prizm and Metro) are currently down for the count. I hate driving this thing.

mryon
May 1st, 2006, 08:05 AM
2005 Subaru Impreza, 16 gallons tank, about 25mpg...

I don't remember what gas costs here, $3.15 US, or so last I looked.

About $50 then to fill up.

but then I've got a two mile commute so I take the car or not. ;)

Chris2005
May 16th, 2006, 01:49 PM
I'd be interested in seeing what it otherwise costs to live in Oz. Was contemplating migrating there a few years ago, but with dad being in his early 80s I'd hate to be gone when the moment came. From what I could tell, it seemed fairly reasonable at the time. Even in the larger cities (Perth, Melbourne).
I hear you guys got a croc problem. I mean a REAL problem, in that they like to eat folk up. Well we got 'gators over here (down south). Seems they're learning from their cousins down unda. There were 3 incidents in the last month where, I believe, deaths occurred. Used to be you could shoo 'em away. Things change...

alexkerhead
May 16th, 2006, 01:57 PM
Gas is starting to cheapen up in Alabama, my local gas station charges $2.60 a gallon now for regular.
I'm happy there. I drive a middle of the spectrum vehicle(1995 v6 exploder), so I get about 18mpg city, and 22mpg highway if I don't flooor it. My 83 silverado(5.01L v8) only gets 9 city and 13 highway though. Needs a rebuild, compression is low.

carlsson
May 16th, 2006, 01:58 PM
The gas price on my nearby self-service station has dropped quite a bit the last few days, from 11.99 via 11.82 and 11.65 to 11.49 SEK/liter today. Ok, it is still ridiculously expensive, but compared to when another station charge 12.16 for similar gas, 11.49 sounds like a total bargain.

carlsson
May 16th, 2006, 02:03 PM
I hear you guys got a croc problem. I mean a REAL problem, in that they like to eat folk up. Well we got 'gators over here (down south). Seems they're learning from their cousins down unda. There were 3 incidents in the last month where, I believe, deaths occurred. Used to be you could shoo 'em away. Things change...
No kidding, even Swedish newspapers write about the aligators in Florida. In less than a week, three women have been killed by 'gators. One was found without her arms, which later were located inside an aligator.

I'm not sure if the Aussie crocs generally are so close to residentials as the 'gators seem to be in Florida (and any other US states). If you go swimming in muddy water at sunset, I think it doesn't matter much which kind of water monster you encounter.

alexkerhead
May 16th, 2006, 02:08 PM
The gas price on my nearby self-service station has dropped quite a bit the last few days, from 11.99 via 11.82 and 11.65 to 11.49 SEK/liter today. Ok, it is still ridiculously expensive, but compared to when another station charge 12.16 for similar gas, 11.49 sounds like a total bargain.
Whoooaaahh! You pay $6US a gallon for gas!
People in the US need to quite griping.
You'd think people would run when they see aligators? Aligatiors aren't very fast.

Terry Yager
May 16th, 2006, 02:25 PM
Crocs hell, what about the baby-eating dingoes?

--T

alexkerhead
May 16th, 2006, 02:28 PM
baby-eating dingoes?

--T
Is there something wrong with that?

Terry Yager
May 16th, 2006, 02:46 PM
W. C Fields is credited with saying: "Any man who hates dogs & lit'le children, can't be all bad."

To which I might be so bold as to add: "Especially the little ankle-biters...of both species!"

--T

dongfeng
May 16th, 2006, 03:28 PM
The price over here is reaching nearly UK£1 per litre. I paid £0.986/litre (£4.49 pounds per UK gallon) when I filled up with unleaded this morning. Let me work that out...

1 litre = US$1.89
1 US gallon = US$7.16

One place I saw today was £0.99/litre...

carlsson
May 17th, 2006, 05:24 AM
One of the political parties over here have suggested to ban sales of (new) petrol cars by 2015. With a bit of luck, it will solve itself if any of the new, alternative fuels gets a big breakthrough. It is almost ten years until then.

Micom 2000
May 17th, 2006, 08:25 AM
In Canada the price has been hovering around Can$ 1.00 a litre. More expensive than in the US. And the rules of the (supposedly) "Free" Trade agreement enforces it.

A good commentary on the intelligence of the average canadian voter.

What kills me is that we are the second biggest oil exporter to the US after Saudi Arabia. Even our hydro exports to the US are cheaper than what the ordinary Canadian pays. So much for the canon of the benefits to a country with plentiful natural resources.

Lawrence

CP/M User
May 18th, 2006, 12:52 AM
Terry Yager wrote:

> Crocs hell, what about the baby-eating dingoes?

That's all a load of Rubbish.

CP/M User.

CP/M User
May 18th, 2006, 12:55 AM
alexkerhead wrote:

> Is there something wrong with that?

Yeah, for nearly 30 years the media has been playing the
public in this tripe which makes the mother look like the
victim - it's all Bull Dust.

CP/M User.

carlsson
May 18th, 2006, 04:15 AM
But the dingo is one of few predators who hunts rabbits, I've heard. They tried to import (UK?) fox, but those animals found other, natural Aussie prey (and sheep/lamb?) more easy to catch than the rabbits they were raised on in the old country.

CP/M User
May 18th, 2006, 04:44 AM
carlsson wrote:

> But the dingo is one of few predators who hunts
> rabbits, I've heard. They tried to import (UK?) fox,
> but those animals found other, natural Aussie prey
> (and sheep/lamb?) more easy to catch than the rabbits
> they were raised on in the old country.

When they generally pack up against something perhaps, though
when we're talking about a remote large area - the odds of one
dingo grabbing a baby don't add up.

Problems associated with Dingoes have been caused through
human interferance in small areas where a large number of
Dingoes can pack up against anyone.

CP/M User.

Terry Yager
May 18th, 2006, 05:40 AM
Terry Yager wrote:

> Crocs hell, what about the baby-eating dingoes?

That's all a load of Rubbish.

CP/M User.

<removing tongue from cheek>Yeah, I know...

--T

alexkerhead
May 18th, 2006, 06:17 AM
Terry Yager wrote:

>baby-eating dingoes?

That's all a load of Rubbish.

CP/M User.
Awwww, really? I was hoping I could buy a pack of them there baby eating dingos. So when I am at a resturant or something, and a baby is crying, I just let loose the Dingos.:D

Terry Yager
May 18th, 2006, 06:29 AM
alexkerhead wrote:

> Is there something wrong with that?

Yeah, for nearly 30 years the media has been playing the
public in this tripe which makes the mother look like the
victim - it's all Bull Dust.

CP/M User.

Actually, I was thinking more of not-quite-baby, Clinton Gage, not the thirty-year-old Chamberlin case. Dingo attacks on humans were almost unheard of before 1995, but in the past decade, there have been over fourty documented attacks on Fraiser Island alone. The dingo population there is becoming so stressed due to the steady encroachment of man upon thier territories, thier natural food supplies are drying up, and with the close proximity of man, the wild dingoes have lost thier natural wariness, and often appear in areas where humans are. Tourists add to the problem by feeding, petting, and otherwise interacting with these wild animals as if they were domestic dogs. Combine these factors with the fact that the island has been experiencing a severe drought for the past few years, stressing the dingoes even further, and it is inevitable that the dingoes would start seeing humans as an alternate food source.

--T

carlsson
May 18th, 2006, 11:27 AM
I also saw a documentary about they're trying to trace the dingo origin and pure-breed it to become a wild, cautious animal. It is thought to have been introduced a couple of thousand years ago when Asian people arrived in boats - either as their pets or on purpose dropped off.

In some places, people have tried to tame it into a pet, and through the centuries dogs are supposed to have mix-breed with dingoes. There is one island outside the main Australia where dogs are not allowed to enter, in order to preserve the remaining dingoes.

Terry Yager
May 18th, 2006, 01:27 PM
Yeah, that would be Fraiser (?) Island, where the only pure-or-nearly-purebreed dingoes now remain, but the tourist trade is putting the 160-odd animals under a lot of stress.

Was that the same docu where they were attempting to determine whether a full-grown male hiker was actually killed by dingoes, or if they just scavenged his already-dead body (all they had to work with was his bones, found at the bottom of a cliff, some two years after he went missing)? (I dunno, I've seen several recent documentaries about dingoes too).

--T

CP/M User
May 18th, 2006, 01:33 PM
Terry Yager wrote:

> Actually, I was thinking more of not-quite-baby,
> Clinton Gage, not the thirty-year-old Chamberlin
> case.

Oh okay - cause this is nothing more than a pile of Dingo
Droppings!

> Dingo attacks on humans were almost unheard of before
> 1995, but in the past decade, there have been over
> fourty documented attacks on Fraiser Island alone.
> The dingo population there is becoming so stressed
> due to the steady encroachment of man upon thier
> territories, thier natural food supplies are drying
> up, and with the close proximity of man, the wild
> dingoes have lost thier natural wariness, and often
> appear in areas where humans are. Tourists add to the
> problem by feeding, petting, and otherwise
> interacting with these wild animals as if they were
> domestic dogs. Combine these factors with the fact
> that the island has been experiencing a severe
> drought for the past few years, stressing the dingoes
> even further, and it is inevitable that the dingoes
> would start seeing hamans as an alternate food
> source.

I was told Fraiser Island originally never had any Dingoe's on
it either, they introduced them years ago and have become a
breeding ground - since their out of their natural environment
& occupying a small amount of space. So yeah, stick a bunch of
people on there, feeding them & doing gawd knows what else &
they'll have expectations from tourists.

Wilson's Prom - Victoria's best kept hidden secret has a
simular problem with Birds, Possum's & Wombats. The birds of
all sizes jump around you & literally grab the food - this is
a result from tourists feeding them - we tried to avoid
feeding them at all costs - but they'd still find a way of
picking up a crum or something. The ranger was telling us if
you leave food in the tent the Wombats will sniff it out &
break in. I reckon the Possum's were just as bad!

CP/M User.

CP/M User
May 18th, 2006, 01:36 PM
Terry Yager wrote"

> Was that the same docu where they were attempting to
> determine whether a full-grown male hiker was
> actually killed by dingoes, or if they just scavenged
> his already-dead body (all they had to work with was
> his bones, found at the bottom of a cliff, some two
> years after he went missing)? (I dunno, I've seen
> several recent documentaries about dingoes too).

I'd say he fell of a cliff, maybe the Dingoes push him off?!

CP/M User.

Terry Yager
May 18th, 2006, 01:47 PM
They weren't sure if the dingoes were stalking him, causing him to become careless and fall, either to his death, or injury/incapacitation. All that they knew for sure was that he was eaten by dingoes, whether or not they were responsible for his death. Most of the recent dingo attacks have been on children, and they've never been known to kill a full adult before, but if he were injured and unable to escape, they may have finished him off. Fortunately, the forensic scientists concluded that based on the scattering pattern of the bones, it was more likely that his body was scavenged, so the poor dingoes didn't catch the rap for killing him.

--T

carlsson
May 18th, 2006, 01:50 PM
I can't recall any hiker in the docu I saw.

Speaking about exotic (sorry, CP/M User) wildlife, has anybody heard if the scientists have made any progress in the restoration of the Tasmanian tiger.. or whatever it is called. An animal that was extinct in the 1950's or even earlier, but there remained a puppy preserved in formaldehyde. They were planning to take DNA samples and using sex cells from a dog or something try to breed the animal again. It was a couple of years ago I saw the documentary, and while Animal Planet routinely reruns old programs, I haven't seen a follow-up yet.

Hmm.. it is a good thing this thread already is in off-topic, since it has just as little to do with gas prices as it has to do with vintage computers. Well, unless you think of extinct (animals) as the ultimate form of something vintage.

CP/M User
May 18th, 2006, 01:52 PM
Terry Yager wrote:

> They weren't sure if the dingoes were stalking him,
> causing him to become careless and fall, either to
> his death, or injury/incapacitation. All that they
> knew for sure was that he was eaten by dingoes,
> whether or not they were responsible for his death.
> Most of the recent dingo attacks have been on
> children, and they've never been known to kill a full
> adult before, but if he were injured and unable to
> escape, they may have finished him off. Fortunately,
> the forensic scientists concluded that based on the
> scattering pattern of the bones, it was more likely
> that his body was scavenged, so the poor dingoes
> didn't catch the rap for killing him.

It sounds more likely he was dead when the Dingoes got to him.

CP/M User.

Terry Yager
May 18th, 2006, 02:00 PM
Or perhaps injured badly enough (near death) that the dogs treated his body as they would any other carrion. On a kill, the food is divided differently among the 'pack' (family group, actually), so the distribution of the bones is different.

--T

CP/M User
May 18th, 2006, 02:02 PM
carlsson wrote:

> Speaking about exotic (sorry, CP/M User) wildlife,
> has anybody heard if the scientists have made any
> progress in the restoration of the Tasmanian tiger..
> or whatever it is called. An animal that was extinct
> in the 1950's or even earlier, but there remained a
> puppy preserved in formaldehyde. They were planning
> to take DNA samples and using sex cells from a dog or
> something try to breed the animal again. It was a
> couple of years ago I saw the documentary, and while
> Animal Planet routinely reruns old programs, I
> haven't seen a follow-up yet.

Heard a little bit based on this - there's a element of Trial
& error involved - the formaldehyde pup maybe carcass. What
beats me is what caused it's extinction in the first place?
And will restorning it guarantee it's survival - who knows
what it needs in order to survive - maybe it was some bug (not
extinct) which maintained it's health - or some food plant
which is now extinct (due to forest clearning). The
Scientists talk about all these wonderful things about
bringing the Tassie Tiger back from the dead - but the
scientists involved don't talk about it's needs.

CP/M User.

carlsson
May 18th, 2006, 02:47 PM
I think hunters in the late 19th century seeing it as a big threat to sheep farming was a big reason to make it go extinct, although there may have been other reasons to, like change of landscape and living conditions. At the end, I understand the last animals were kept at zoos around the world.

Not that we can be certain prize hunters would not try to shoot it if they were able to breed new species and eventually put out in the wild.

CP/M User
May 19th, 2006, 01:57 PM
carlsson wrote:

> I think hunters in the late 19th century seeing it as
> a big threat to sheep farming was a big reason to
> make it go extinct, although there may have been
> other reasons to, like change of landscape and living
> conditions. At the end, I understand the last animals
> were kept at zoos around the world.

> Not that we can be certain prize hunters would not
> try to shoot it if they were able to breed new
> species and eventually put out in the wild.

They were farming the wrong thing - some farming practices are
carried out differently nowadays & some of the farmers I know
nowadays are interested on how they can manage the land
effectively - sure that probably doesn't mean farmers will
shot whatever they deem a pest - I'd like to think that
farmers think about their actions a little more carefully when
shooting anything. Unfortunately, man still insists that
killing something which kills humans is justified.

CP/M User.

carlsson
May 20th, 2006, 03:20 AM
Yeah, electric fences and other measures to keep predators out. But I can only compare to the situation of wolves in Sweden. They were almost extinct, but a few were imported from Russia to build up a small population. These wolves are protected, and as long as they stay far into the woods, only hunters will hate them, fearing for their dogs when they go hunting. As soon as the wolf is sighted anywhere near civilization, everyone take precaution and the old hunting rifle is put in standby. Sometimes big, wild dogs are found to kill the sheep, but the wolves get the blame. It seems the most important thing is to keep the wolves wild in the forest, afraid of people, because the more tame they become the bigger risks something goes bad.

It goes without saying, but cross-breeding any race of dogs with a wolf is absolutely forbidden. Probably you would get a longer punishment for doing that than murdering another person. Swedish law and justitia is a bit skewed sometimes.

CP/M User
May 20th, 2006, 03:57 AM
carlsson wrote:

> Yeah, electric fences and other measures to keep
> predators out. But I can only compare to the
> situation of wolves in Sweden. They were almost
> extinct, but a few were imported from Russia to build
> up a small population. These wolves are protected,
> and as long as they stay far into the woods, only
> hunters will hate them, fearing for their dogs when
> they go hunting. As soon as the wolf is sighted
> anywhere near civilization, everyone take precaution
> and the old hunting rifle is put in standby.
> Sometimes big, wild dogs are found to kill the sheep,
> but the wolves get the blame. It seems the most
> important thing is to keep the wolves wild in the
> forest, afraid of people, because the more tame they
> become the bigger risks something goes bad.

It makes me wonder sometimes if things were mean't to be this
way & humans are humans - sure we're a small group who want to
do good to make a happier carning place driven by our own
ambitions.
When I think about what Man has done to let these species
loose - this is what you get & something needs to be done to
restore their own environments.

> It goes without saying, but cross-breeding any race
> of dogs with a wolf is absolutely forbidden. Probably
> you would get a longer punishment for doing that than
> murdering another person. Swedish law and justitia is
> a bit skewed sometimes.

We have simular issues with our court systems, though in many
cases it's the system which is letting itself down - too many
loopholes which let things get by - which might provote
further problems - based on arguments used in cases (e.g. This
Vs. That).

What a great place it would be if every mistake was re-routed
through a wormhole or something & your back the that day (you
know a Groundhog day or something! :-)

CP/M User.

canuck46
May 26th, 2006, 08:59 PM
I thought we were talking about gas prices....Now its "Dingos".....Whats a Dingo??? ....If there as good as Alex says I to want some....having just come from a restaurant with a pile of "Little People" around..haha.
Anyways Gas up here in the Great Wet North is around $1.16 a litre or $5.27 for American Gallon...thats not considering exchange rate...still sucks... I remember the days when I had my trusty 55 Chev with dual 4 Bbls....at .35 a Gallon I could cruise all weekend for $10.00...another $10 for Beer and I had it made... Of course that was about the time TVs came out in colour !!!!:whatthat: