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facattack
May 19th, 2012, 08:13 PM
Fun little thread.

I think they were beige so when they got old, the dust wouldn't be blamed for the ugly color of the plastic! I forget what model Power PC this was, but I saw them in 1998 and sorta fell in love.

barythrin
May 21st, 2012, 09:11 AM
Is there a photo of the model type you're referring to?

Compgeke
May 21st, 2012, 09:48 AM
I would assume because Beige was cheap, why else would every other computer of the time be beige also?

NeXT
May 21st, 2012, 10:33 AM
The 90's.

krebizfan
May 21st, 2012, 02:17 PM
I would assume because Beige was cheap, why else would every other computer of the time be beige also?

Computers stopped being beige at the time Apple went to beige. IBM moved over to black; Gateway 2000 changed cases to off-white; Packard Bell went for grey. I thought the true reason was Apple ran out of good ideas and was stuck doing whatever IBM used to do. Had Michael Spindler stayed in charge for a few more years, Apple would have introduced an official punch card reader to improve enterprise compatability.

Anonymous Freak
May 21st, 2012, 02:56 PM
Apple moved to the 'beige' color in 1987 with the introduction of the Macintosh SE and Macintosh II. Its official name was "Platinum", to differentiate it from 'beige' color that was the official color of all previous Macintoshes.

The same "Platinum" color later got retro-renamed "beige" when more colorful systems started coming out.

commodorejohn
May 21st, 2012, 03:09 PM
Apple moved to the 'beige' color in 1987 with the introduction of the Macintosh SE and Macintosh II. Its official name was "Platinum", to differentiate it from 'beige' color that was the official color of all previous Macintoshes.

The same "Platinum" color later got retro-renamed "beige" when more colorful systems started coming out.
No, "Platinum" on Macs is a light grey (same as on the Apple IIGS.) If you've seen beige-colored Mac IIs and SEs, it's because of plastic discoloration.

Macs before the II and the SE were beige, though, and I think the Classic and Classic II were as well.

dorkbert
May 21st, 2012, 04:15 PM
No, "Platinum" on Macs is a light grey (same as on the Apple IIGS.) If you've seen beige-colored Mac IIs and SEs, it's because of plastic discoloration.

Macs before the II and the SE were beige, though, and I think the Classic and Classic II were as well.

No, Apple went through several colours over the years.

II/II+/non-numeric keypad IIes - beige
IIc - white
IIc+/IIGS - platinum

Mac (128k)/Fat Mac (512k)/Mac Plus (early) - beige
Mac Plus (late)/Mac SE/Mac SE30/Mac II/IIx/IIfx/IIcx/IIci/IIsi/ (blah blah blah) - platinum

I think until the B&W G3 when Apple went "ice crazy" all the machines were platinum.

Eudimorphodon
May 21st, 2012, 04:23 PM
Regardless of the later systems being called "Platinum" they were "beige" in practice. They may have been "Light metallic gray" right out of the box but a combination of light exposure and dust rendered them "light brown" within a year or two in every setting I ever observed them in. (Offices, labs, etc.)

Anyway, when discussing computers just about any case color from off-white to medium brown is generically referred to as "Beige". (I don't know if the "Antique White" of IBM's PS/2s qualifies or not, but I'd say the dividing line is somewhere between them and "Platinum" Macs.) Not sure what good it does to split hairs.

barythrin
May 21st, 2012, 04:27 PM
Well, Apple had the IIe Platinum, so obviously that color was probably their term too. I was sorta thinking that perhaps they wanted to enter the office marketplace vs home and mimicked their PC brethren? Although again, I'm not quite sure if there was any research published regarding computer color schemes, or if it was a laziness combined with the natural plastic color, or if it held up well vs other colors fading under office light, etc. i.e. take a look at news paper clippings under the fluorescent office light glow over years, looks similar to a smokers computer.

twolazy
May 21st, 2012, 06:07 PM
My Mac classic is platinum as well as my Mac LC. If I recall correctly, this generation is when apple made a complete switchover from beige to platinum till the imac... TBH alot of the accessories were beige, so why not have the computers match. Seems like a logical answer to me.

Tor
May 22nd, 2012, 04:22 AM
I saw this in a DEC section on Usenet many years ago:



"Beige shall be the colour of computers and the colour of computers shall be beige. Grey shalt it not be, neither shalt it be white, excepting that it then is painteth beige. Black is right out. Once the colour beige, being the colour of computers, be achieved, then thou shalt distributeth thy miscoloured components into the possesion of thine foe, who, being naughty in my sight, shall snuff it."


-Tor

Dave Farquhar
May 22nd, 2012, 05:55 AM
The reason IBM used two tones of beige on its original IBM PCs was because the color does a pretty good job of hiding dust and dirt. And psychologically, that color scheme encourages feelings of safety and security. That's the reason landlords tend to paint rental properties in hues of beige.

In the mid 1980s, other companies adopted similar colors. Some sooner than others. By the mid 1990s, companies started trying other colors again.

facattack
May 22nd, 2012, 06:27 AM
Is there a photo of the model type you're referring to?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_Macintosh_G3

G3 if i'm not mistaken.

billdeg
May 22nd, 2012, 10:37 AM
There were very few if any clear computers for some reason.

gubbish
May 22nd, 2012, 10:46 AM
The Macintosh really should have been plaid, to celebrate its ancient heritage:
http://lochcarron.com/reiver/macintosh_clan.html

Anonymous Freak
May 22nd, 2012, 02:11 PM
No, "Platinum" on Macs is a light grey (same as on the Apple IIGS.) If you've seen beige-colored Mac IIs and SEs, it's because of plastic discoloration.

Macs before the II and the SE were beige, though, and I think the Classic and Classic II were as well.

Sorry for the confusion in my statement, I did mean Platnium, but then referring to the fact that many people called "Platinum" Macintoshes "beige" later on. (Even brand-new ones, not plastic discolored ones.) Having owned many from brand new to now-antique, I can attest to the "Platinum" color not being gray, but having a slightly yellowish-brownish tint to it. AKA, "beige". The older "Beige" Macs and Apples had a decidedly more brownish tint to it.

RickNel
May 22nd, 2012, 11:11 PM
I thought Macs went beige during the period when they had lost any obvious uniqueness, so they adopted a puritanical policy that you should not love them for the outward appearance, only for their inner Apple-ness.

When Steve Jobs returned, we got the iMac eye-candy principle (I have 3 candy iMacs and a white eMac), and now everybody loves their Apple gadget above all for its outward appearance.

Less spiritual, more worldly.:cool:

tipc
May 23rd, 2012, 08:03 PM
The reason IBM used two tones of beige on its original IBM PCs was because the color does a pretty good job of hiding dust and dirt. And psychologically, that color scheme encourages feelings of safety and security. That's the reason landlords tend to paint rental properties in hues of beige.

In the mid 1980s, other companies adopted similar colors. Some sooner than others. By the mid 1990s, companies started trying other colors again.

IBM's beige was the accepted business environment color, that incidentally they must have instituted. You might say they gave it as much color/hue as they could get away with.

On other computers, if not beige, then what? Imagine a red computer in the 80's? Blue? Green? Way too funky or avant garde. The "eggshell" of the Tandy 2000 and Mindset and a number of others were drop dead gorgeous to me. It might just be that I fell sort of in love w/Tandy computers, being they were so well "advertised' in their giveaway catalogs. I used to drool. And when BYTE reviewed the T2K, they dubbed it's color an "attractive eggshell white", which sort of captured the visual flava of the Tandy computers nicely. The Mindset was high art in those days, and they didn't depart from the eggshell/beige pattern. Too much color probably would have made units look toyish?

Incidentally the Atari ST line was bluish, or is it just my eyes? More gray then anything. Another hot looking unit.

What, wasn't it the NEXT that broke all the trends? The Canon Cat was eggshell more or less. Don't call that beige, it's not. Amiga was a darker beige if you will. Not too much color, except perhaps in MSX boxes in those days. Can't think of much anyway.

commodorejohn
May 23rd, 2012, 08:43 PM
On other computers, if not beige, then what? Imagine a red computer in the 80's? Blue? Green? Way too funky or avant garde.
Not so much in the '80s, but in the mid-late '70s early hobbyist computers were all over the map: blue, orange, black, wood-grain...any number of shape styles, too.

barythrin
May 24th, 2012, 11:51 AM
Was there much variation/standards in mainframes/data center computing in the 70's/early 80's? I know lots of vendors seem to pick a color scheme and stick with it so it's somewhat easy to identify their gear. I would think that the business computer might take on the same color as the data center computers just to seem like a smaller but powerful computer.

I've never heard that before regarding a calming affect of beige but I believe it. I know that trick has been around for decades with the restaurant industry (fast food using red/yellow colors and fast music to get people to eat faster and get in and out). Yellow is a color that is supposed to make people happy (not sure I see that myself but psychology research says so). Tobacco white (beige) just reminds me of the work place and I don't think gives me any warm fuzzies.

The desktops we've had for the last few years (Dell then HP) have all been black and silver. I think that's a trend to look high-tech/metallic or something. Funny all the servers (Dell) have blue lights but one system we bought (huge SAN system) has green. We thought it was funny but yes it looks cool, but it looks sorta borgish. Turns out that's what the CEO of the SAN company liked about it, he liked green and in fact thought of the Borg when developing the system.

DOS lives on!!
May 24th, 2012, 12:14 PM
I've never heard that before regarding a calming affect of beige but I believe it.
That's exactly why the Blue Screen of Death is blue. Blue has been proven to have the same calming affect. And also because when early versions of Windows had a catastrophic event, they'd drop down to a lower color scheme, and blue was second behind black.

Anyway, I think beige was just the computer case color of the time. Almost all the personal computers of the 90s were beige. But I don't feel any calmer using my Power Macintosh 5260.;)

EverythingIBM
May 24th, 2012, 12:55 PM
The reason IBM used two tones of beige on its original IBM PCs was because the color does a pretty good job of hiding dust and dirt. And psychologically, that color scheme encourages feelings of safety and security. That's the reason landlords tend to paint rental properties in hues of beige.

In the mid 1980s, other companies adopted similar colors. Some sooner than others. By the mid 1990s, companies started trying other colors again.

Precisely!

PC clone manufacturers started copying IBM's beige trend, which ensued a whole slew of beige computers.

It's humorous to note how computers were black, then beige, and now black again. I wonder if the beige trend will start up again.

tipc
May 24th, 2012, 06:04 PM
you know that is true. I have half of an Intel MDS system, and it was blue. Forgot all about that. But the 80s was the evil business decade. Computers had to get down to bidniss.

Eudimorphodon
May 25th, 2012, 09:25 AM
Of course, these days we all know which company Apple is copying with their hardware designs and color schemes, chicklet keyboards and all.

9051