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k2x4b524[
June 5th, 2012, 10:04 PM
Intel 80186

iA80186
L91705417
'78 '82
This is PGA
I have one of those

And i have 3 of these, 1 intel and 2 amd variants in PLCC

iN80186
L0232315
Copyright 1978

Are these actually any use, maybe as a spare to a Tandy 2000? I know someone in the forums has one or two of those rare beasties.

NeXT
June 5th, 2012, 10:34 PM
the 186 was never used in 100% PC compatible systems simply because it wasn't fully compatible with the 8086.
Only stuff I ever saw that used the 80186 was for embedded applications.

k2x4b524[
June 5th, 2012, 10:45 PM
They came off of network card that were pretty much corroded to the sockets, thankfully the rom chips and these weren't corroded at all. I figure someone may want a spare chip for their Tandy 2000 or something, so i'm trying to see what else they could be used for or if there is interested. If anything i may make a keyring out of one of the PLCC ones.

cchaven
June 6th, 2012, 04:32 AM
I'm nearly positive that the Model 2000 uses the PLCC variant. Oddly, I couldn't find mention of which carrier it uses in the hardware reference manual when I quickly looked earlier. I've got a couple of 2000's plus a trashed parts machine. I'd be interested in the Intel PLCC chip.

Jeff

Chuck(G)
June 6th, 2012, 07:55 AM
The 80816/80C186/80188/80C188 was used in a lot of peripherals and a few PCs. The stumbling block for PCs (such as the Tandy 2000) is that the on-chip peripherals aren't compatible, though it's perfectly possible to use PC-style peripheral chips with it.

US Robotics Courier modems, for example, used the 80188; Cipher tape drives used them...the list is very long. The first 80816 that I used was in a ceramic LCC, but the chip family went on for a very long time, well into the 90s with several variations. The 80C186EC, for example, is more PC-like with a boatload of on-chip peripherals and comes in a 100 pin PQFP.

Megatron-uk
June 6th, 2012, 12:33 PM
The UK educational IT supplier, RM (Research Machines), used the 80186 in one of their early PC models.

http://www.old-computers.com/museum/computer.asp?c=1011&st=1

nige the hippy
June 6th, 2012, 02:56 PM
and the Burroughs B20 http://www.google.co.uk/imgres?um=1&hl=en&safe=off&sa=N&biw=1424&bih=757&tbm=isch&tbnid=W1ysdI3R5Q-e9M:&imgrefurl=http://www.spuriousthoughts.com/2009/11/&docid=HVUe-harZbFxtM&imgurl=http://www.dvq.com/oldcomp/photos2/b20_2.JPG&w=3036&h=1968&ei=dt_PT83GNIf80QXyqtHJCw&zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=316&vpy=152&dur=420&hovh=181&hovw=279&tx=162&ty=93&sig=102977539568579953300&page=1&tbnh=127&tbnw=169&start=0&ndsp=31&ved=1t:429,r:1,s:0,i:73 (or at least the variant I had - and gave away) used one. It's annoying there's one in pieces spinning round on Ebay UK at ludicrous prices. Interesting (ish) modular machine.

animekenji
July 5th, 2012, 06:47 AM
the 186 was never used in 100% PC compatible systems simply because it wasn't fully compatible with the 8086.
Only stuff I ever saw that used the 80186 was for embedded applications.

Actually, the Tandy 2000 used it. I also seem to remember reading in the back pages of Computer Shopper a long time ago, back when it was as big as a phone book, some liquidator or other selling 80186 based computers cheap. I don't know if they were Tandy 2K's with the Tandy badges removed or some other 80186 based machine, though. Compatibility issues and the timing of the release of the 286 pretty much doomed it as a home computer CPU.