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sfcspanky
May 6th, 2006, 08:02 PM
http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=112142

Jorg
May 6th, 2006, 10:37 PM
You mean, actually we are having the 'Obsolete Computer Forum' here?

CP/M User
May 7th, 2006, 12:54 AM
Jorg wrote:

> You mean, actually we are having the 'Obsolete
> Computer Forum' here?

By Apple's Definition - Erik's motto will have to be slightly different.

According to my Dictionary - the term obsolete can fall into a number of categories:



1. Fallen into disuse, or no longer in use: an obsolete word

2. out of date : an obsolete battleship

3. Biol. imperfectly developed in comparision with the corresponding character in other individuals, as of the opposite sex or of a related species.


I'm assuming they mean the second definition - but really,
what does "Out of Date" really mean?!? I want answers for
this.

I mean we're all here & now - date is a religous belief - yet
it's something people take for granted - religous or not. Out
of Date - must be Out of Date itself - cause we're all here &
now - we can still obtain what we need - some stuff is harder
than others of course - still! So as I still see it, the only
thing which is out of date, dates back before man! ;-)

CP/M User.

Jorg
May 7th, 2006, 01:26 AM
Yes, of course, I did forget the smiley in above's post. ;)

carlsson
May 7th, 2006, 08:37 AM
Apple could just as well call the 5-7 year old computers "past" or "retired" models. Some people want to use the "antique" word for old computers, but most antique collectors would object about calling something newer than 40 years old for antique.

Terry Yager
May 7th, 2006, 08:49 AM
I think they mean 'out-of-date' in the sense of 'no longer supported' (by them).

--T

CP/M User
May 7th, 2006, 03:23 PM
Terry Yager wrote:

> I think they mean 'out-of-date' in the sense of 'no
> longer supported' (by them).

I'd better e-mail them just to see what they mean. I'll write
back if I get a responce.

At least their happy enough to have a list of things they no
longer support - Atari simply shut-up shop & don't want to
even talk about their old stuff, or even their new stuff based
on their old stuff for that matter!!

CP/M User.

carlsson
May 8th, 2006, 05:15 AM
Maybe because Atari has been bought and traded as a trademark back and forth, so any patents, resources or even knowledge of the back catalog is likely to have been lost many years ago. Similar to Commodore. Apple have tried different CEOs a few times, but the main company has always been there in unharmed fashion AFAIK.

wgoodf
May 8th, 2006, 02:08 PM
Apple could just as well call the 5-7 year old computers "past" or "retired" models. Some people want to use the "antique" word for old computers, but most antique collectors would object about calling something newer than 40 years old for antique.

i think for antique, you are really looking at over 100years to get that title. as far as tech is concerned well.......


although it has to be said you can still download some apple // software from the apple site, so i guess they still support in some fashion.

carlsson
May 8th, 2006, 05:30 PM
Some furniture and tableware from the 50'ties are considered antiquities by now, but I think that is about as far as most experts would go in the time line. Perhaps 60'ties for some rare stuff. On the other hand, words like antique, vintage, old, outdated, obsolete and so on seem to have multiple meanings (only focusing on age) in different contexts, so maybe we shouldn't put too much importance in how Apple refers to their prior models. If vintage originally comes from seasoning good wines, it should in some way mean that their older Macintosh models are more exquisite and elegant than their current offerings. :-)

Terry Yager
May 8th, 2006, 10:54 PM
I spent a few hours prowling 'round the nether-regions of the Quarter tonite. Managed to pick up a vintage musical instrument, (pix to come, soon's I feel like messing with 'em) in some open-air junque shoppe. (Down home, we call 'em 'yard sales', but 'round here the moniker-of-choice is 'Antique Emporium').

--T