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Caluser2000
June 25th, 2012, 05:29 PM
ftp://ftp.metalab.unc.edu/pub/historic-linux/distributions Have fun.

Chuck(G)
June 25th, 2012, 05:45 PM
What's "Linix"? :)

Ole Juul
June 25th, 2012, 06:04 PM
ftp://ftp.metalab.unc.edu/pub/historic-linux/distributions Have fun.

Thanks Cal. Definitely something for the winter months. :)

It looks like there's a few more there than this German site, but there might be something more, so I'll post it: http://linux-distributions.org/

Or how about Linux 0.01 http://www.kernel.org/pub/linux/kernel/Historic/

There was a previous related thread (http://www.vintage-computer.com/vcforum/archive/index.php/t-21983.html) which might be of interest to someone now.

DOS lives on!!
June 25th, 2012, 06:07 PM
Thanks for sharing these. Better for me to start from the early versions than the newest, isn't it. :)

Ole Juul
June 25th, 2012, 06:12 PM
What's "Linix"? :)

Space earth realized (http://www.linix.com.au/), or perhaps 精神文 (http://www.linix.com.cn/)? Comodorians will of course think Lunix (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LUnix).

Ole Juul
June 25th, 2012, 06:15 PM
Thanks for sharing these. Better for me to start from the early versions than the newest, isn't it. :)

I wouldn't think so. Things are very different now.

Caluser2000
June 25th, 2012, 10:14 PM
What's "Linix"? :)Well noted. Linux for those in a hurry to post before the boss walks in post lunch break.


Thanks for sharing these. Better for me to start from the early versions than the newest, isn't it. :)

You could gradually work backwards or try Linux from scratch http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/

The link I posted may not be that useful but I hope others like Ole have some useful links to historic (goodness are they really that old?) Linux distros.

RickNel
June 26th, 2012, 12:25 AM
or perhaps 精神文? .

This translates as "psychic text" (among other meanings). I could do with some of that for help diagnosing hardware mysteries.. Or even reading Chinese instruction manuals "translated" into English.

Ole Juul
June 26th, 2012, 12:52 AM
You could gradually work backwards or try Linux from scratch http://www.linuxfromscratch.org/

Actually working backwards is indeed probably more instructive. Linux from scratch is also a good idea if one is ambitious. I got the book a few years back. Perhaps I should have a look at it. lol


The link I posted may not be that useful but I hope others like Ole have some useful links to historic (goodness are they really that old?) Linux distros.

Don't look at me! I thought you were the expert. :)

The link you posted has a lot of actually useful versions as well as a few originals like Yggdrasil and SLS. Still the 0.01 version is calling out to me. I plan to have a look at that some time.

The first version that I tried I downloaded from a BBS over a period of a week or so. One floppy image at a time. That was in '94 and I think it was Slackware 2.0 which used Linux 1.09. I had to look that up, so yes, they are really that old. ;) Writing half a dozen 1.44 floppies or more takes some time, and so does installing from them. That's a bit of an arduous task compared to sticking in a CD, clicking 3 or 4 times, and having a base system in 5 minutes like nowadays.

Ole Juul
June 26th, 2012, 12:58 AM
This translates as "psychic text" (among other meanings). I could do with some of that for help diagnosing hardware mysteries.. Or even reading Chinese instruction manuals "translated" into English.
Psychic text eh? I just took a random cut from the web page. :) I was surprised to see how popular the name Linix actually was.

So, has anybody actually tried UNIX for the Commodore 64 - aka Lunix?

g4ugm
June 26th, 2012, 04:28 PM
What fun. I remember installing yggdrasil via a boot disk and FTP from Manchester University Computer Center....
.... almost as slow as OS/2

Caluser2000
June 29th, 2012, 08:27 PM
Anyone here buy the yggdrasil cd or take up the subscription at all? http://kerneltrap.org/mailarchive/linux-activists/1992/12/1/16961

ahm
June 30th, 2012, 06:14 AM
http://www.ibiblio.org/pub/historic-linux/distributions/

Mike Chambers
June 30th, 2012, 12:59 PM
Wow, I started with Debian 3.0 "Woody"... I think I'm going to play with one of the early 90's distros in QEMU. That should be interesting. I'd like to see just how far it's advanced.

Caluser2000
June 30th, 2012, 03:57 PM
Wow, I started with Debian 3.0 "Woody"... I think I'm going to play with one of the early 90's distros in QEMU. That should be interesting. I'd like to see just how far it's advanced.That'd be kawl. I'll load a few mid-late 90's distros on a ss7 system and post a few sceenshots

Caluser2000
July 6th, 2012, 02:53 AM
Finally got around to getting P1 166 with 128megs of ram, 8 gig hdd. Installed Turbo Linux Server 6.0 (released around the end of 1999 beginning of 2000). Just did and install everything letting it set up the partitioning. Went rather well. Setting up Xwindows required me to swap out the video card. The LCD monitor needs the menu selected before the desktop comes up otherwise it reports no signal and goes to sleep. Obviously not an issue with a crt monitor. Around 900megs all up of Hdd space taken up. FWTW it has a number of kernals i386, i586 and i686 along with their SMP equivalents. Kernal is 2.2.14-3 for those interested.

The "turbopkg" seems to be better at sorting dependencies than a lot of other rpm tools. I've got a few cds from the 1998 through 2002 era - Redhat 5.2-7.3, Mandrake 6.1 and SuSE 7.3. Installed and removed packages from RH 6.0, 6.2 and MD 6.1 Just add RedHat/RPMS/ to the default path and turbopkg goes off and does it's thing. Haven't tried packages from RH 7.3 or SuSE yet. I've left KDE stuff out for the time being. Kinda like the look gtk apps with metal theme. Usually I'd have a dependency issue by now.

No intentional reboots at all and quite snappy. I must admit I inadvertently press crtl-alt-del at one point though doh! Windows moment ;).

Initial Turbo Linux Server desktop is Gnome 1.2 with E16 as it's window manager. The second CD has source files with extra apps on the 3rd CD. I've set the desktop up to run WindowMaker (ver 0.60 from Mandrake 6.1) http://windowmaker.org/ , using wmakerconf sort out it's menu. I've installed a few other wms http://xwinman.org/ -Sawmill, AfterStep, Icewm to name a few, from the various distros along with icons, background images and tiles.

TurboLinux was critisied at the time of it's release for not having a pretty pointy clicky installation, prefering Redhat text style (which I like anyway) and splitting it's configuration tools up. It was also noted by the reviewers it appeared snapper in Xwindows to it's contemporaries. The user manual is a damn sight better than the documentation of a lot of distros of the time as well.

It's got the usual desktop apps Abi Word, Gnumeric, yadda yadda installed now. I'm going to see what the latest version of Opera static I can put on it just for the hell of it. Not networked yet but it's very straight foward. I can use an ISA pnp ne2000 compatible card as a last resort as long as it's address is set to 300.

So a few hours wasted installing an outdated unpopular distro on a oldish bit of kit just for the hell of it. What more could you ask for on a crappy winters day ahh?

Screen shot to come..........................

Edit: Got the monitor issue sorted More lack of familiararity on my part.

Megatron-uk
July 6th, 2012, 02:54 PM
I remember trying Linux back in about 1994/1995 - I think it was a very early Slackware on something like 14x 1.44mb floppies I downloaded at college. Something like kernel 1.0.12, very basic driver support in XFree86 (mainly Cirrus, S3 and Trident, IIRC), probably TWM or OLWM window managers. I ran it on a 8Mb 486DX2-50, and very cool it was too! :-)

barythrin
July 6th, 2012, 03:09 PM
If you want an interesting challenge, see what distros will install on a 486 or 386. That was my huge hurdle when I had first started tinkering with linux. Most of the prettied up GUI type of install distros (I'm the opposite but I'm also a geek so I did like turbolinux and hated Caldera). Anyway long story short I had some knowledgeable folks let me know that few distros used the original kernel code and they had removed support for pre-pentium processors. Was a shocker since in the late 90's it was still one of those claims to fame that linux enthusiasts loved to brag about (linux could fit on a floppy, could run on minimal system specs, etc).

tone76
July 6th, 2012, 04:32 PM
I have Linux 0.1.1 somewhere on 2 x 1.2MB 5.25" floppies! There was a boot disk and a root disk if I remember correctly. This would be from about 1992 or so.

Caluser2000
July 6th, 2012, 06:52 PM
If you want an interesting challenge, see what distros will install on a 486 or 386. 486s aren't a biggy really http://www.vintage-computer.com/vcforum/showthread.php?21848-Linux-on-their-486-class-machines/ There's been a few recent blogs with folk giving it shot on 486/386 class machines. There are a few modern distros that support 486s as well.

Doug G
July 6th, 2012, 08:47 PM
I have a couple boxed retail linux distros, I have Redhat 6.1 and 7 with the original books and CD's, and SuSE 9. I think I bought them all at Best Buy.

Pepinno
July 6th, 2012, 10:17 PM
Finally got around to getting P1 166 with 128megs of ram, 8 gig hdd. Installed Turbo Linux Server 6.0

What chipset is your P1 machine using? Does it cache the whole 128 MB of RAM, or only the first 64 MB?

Caluser2000
July 6th, 2012, 11:12 PM
What chipset is your P1 machine using? Does it cache the whole 128 MB of RAM, or only the first 64 MB?It's a i430TX chipset, so limited to 64 megs for caching by all accounts. It is very snappy running the software I've got on it.

Megatron-uk
July 7th, 2012, 01:03 AM
If you want an interesting challenge, see what distros will install on a 486 or 386. That was my huge hurdle when I had first started tinkering with linux. Most of the prettied up GUI type of install distros (I'm the opposite but I'm also a geek so I did like turbolinux and hated Caldera). Anyway long story short I had some knowledgeable folks let me know that few distros used the original kernel code and they had removed support for pre-pentium processors. Was a shocker since in the late 90's it was still one of those claims to fame that linux enthusiasts loved to brag about (linux could fit on a floppy, could run on minimal system specs, etc).

Technically Linux will still run on 386/486 cpu machines without a problem, however, most distributions of Linux come with the kernel configured for Pentium architecture and without floating point emulation - you'd just need a kernel compiled for a 386/486 if you wanted to use such a system.

Of course, all of the userland applications and libraries have grown dramatically since early versions of Linux, so such a system would probably struggle :-)

Caluser2000
July 7th, 2012, 02:08 AM
Ain't that the truth. A bit of fun/learning can be had though mucking around the old stuff. My 4yo grandson even had a shot at a few games on the P1 this evening and was intrigued with xeyes.

natcha
July 7th, 2012, 04:31 AM
Technically Linux will still run on 386/486 cpu machines without a problem, however, most distributions of Linux come with the kernel configured for Pentium architecture and without floating point emulation - you'd just need a kernel compiled for a 386/486 if you wanted to use such a system.

Of course, all of the userland applications and libraries have grown dramatically since early versions of Linux, so such a system would probably struggle :-)

The best Linux distribution for 386/486 that I have had success with is Slackware Linux 7.1. I have the 4CD set from July 2000. I have it running on an Omnibook 430 that only has 8 mb of memory. Plenty of software on the distribution along with plenty of compilers. Not exactly fast on the OB430, and not enough memory for X-Windows, but pretty nice otherwise. I have installed it both as native partion and as UMSDOS partition. For fast setup, just use the ZIPSLACK or BIGSLACK to a MSDOS file system, boot and off you go.

On the OB430, the power management doesn't work, so have to do a hard reset to restart system. On an OB600C, the power management does work. And the OB's floppy drives and PCMCIA don't work in linux. But still a lot of fun for a handheld computer.

The Slackware Distribuitions are all available for download from the Slackware web site. The oldest is Slackware 3.0. But I recommend 7.1 for a usable system on a 386/486.


Bill

Caluser2000
January 7th, 2015, 10:27 AM
It's been a few years. Boy time flies. Never did get around to posting screen shots either.

My boxed Linux related collection is gradually growing. Picked up RH 6.2, Xandros 2.0 Deluxe/Busines Editions and Linux Utilities for RH 5.0. Turbo Linux Workstation 6.0 is on its way.

billdeg
January 8th, 2015, 04:22 AM
I have the SCO Linux for 386 set

Eudimorphodon
January 8th, 2015, 11:21 AM
Heh. The one old Linux CD I've refused to throw away over the years is a Caldara (SCO) Linux "Technology Preview" CD I picked up at trade show in 2000 that proudly proclaims that it features the "Linux 2.4 Kernel!" (not officially "final" when the CD was stamped). Anyone keeping score knows why it's an absolute treasure (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SCO%E2%80%93Linux_controversies).

Caluser2000
January 8th, 2015, 11:32 AM
I remember reading all the Groklaw stuff. Interesting reading at the time.

I've got Caldera OpenLinux 2.3 that comes with the 2000 McGraw-Hill "LINUX Desktop Starter Kit" Apparently the installation routine runs from within win9x.

lowen
January 8th, 2015, 12:09 PM
Blast from the past....

I wish I had kept the SLS I had years ago on QIC-40 floppy tape.......

But, for your amusement, the following:

Red Hat Linux 5.2, CD sleeve open (and, yes, the third CD does indeed contain WordPerfect 7 for Linux......):
22079

Ubuntu 5.04 for PowerPC (ye olde Mac G4!):
22080

Red Hat Linux Power Tools 4.2 (Includes Red Hat Linux 4.2 for Intel, Alpha, and SPARC and two CD's on archives from sunsite.unc.edu)
2208122082

I was a Red Hat Beta Tester for a few years (and the NDA expired several years ago), and as a perk for beta testing I received full boxed sets of Red Hat 6.2 through Red Hat 9, the last Red Hat Linux (a different beast from Red Hat Enterprise Linux). The Red Hat Linux 7.2 Professional set included the daddy of OpenOffice.org, StarOffice 5.2. I also have Linux Mandrake 5.3 (Red Hat 5.2 plus KDE) that I purchased from CheapBytes, and that system is still running (on an AMD K6/2-500).

If you want a real laugh, pick up a Red Hat Linux install CD from the 5.x timeframe and install using the 'Redneck' language. (see: http://forums.fedoraforum.org/showthread.php?t=293714 ) and if you would like I guess I could screenshot the whole rigamarole.....( The wayback machine has a good copy of it: https://web.archive.org/web/20130406181710/http://www.ninesys.com/fun/ )

For a while, there were a few Ethernet card vendors who bundled Caldera or TurboLinux with their NIC's; I don't recall right off-hand which NIC vendors those were.

Caluser2000
January 8th, 2015, 12:21 PM
Word Perfect shipped with a number of commercial distro bundles Coral Linux 1.x had WP 8.0 Being a bit late it was first distro I had a shot at. Borked it quite a few times. They actually didn't do too bad a job looking back.

I've still got RH 7.3 on my P200mmx system. Got it to a point I was comfortable with it eventually. Took a while but got there and considered it a worthwhile learning exercise. Trimmed down got rid of all the heavy Gnome 1.4 cruft- Nautilus et el